All posts by Kelly Edwards

Reception planned for retiring Education Team Coordinator Mary Pirotte

Senior Education Team Coordinator Mary Pirotte, a longtime staff member of the Office of Student Affairs, will retire from her role at the School of Medicine at the end of June.

Pirotte has served as ETC for the Blue unit for the last 14 years. She started as an education assistant for the Gold unit in 1989. During her time at the school, she has been a member of the curriculum council and the evaluation council. And she has worked with every dean of the medical school in some capacity.

A reception is planned from 3:30-5 p.m. on June 28 in the fifth-floor Biomedical and Health Informatics conference room, M5-103.

Missouri medical association awards scholarships to UMKC students

School of Medicine recipients of Missouri State Medical Association scholarships are: (front row, left to right) Rico Beuford, Austin Harris, Adele Souter, Elizabeth Robin, Paige Charboneau. (Back row) Fred Hahn, M.D., MSMA representative, Dylan Schwindt, Robert Johnson, Keaton Altom, Samuel Maples. Not pictured: Madeline Klaesner

The Missouri State Medical Association recently awarded scholarships to 10 students at the UMKC School of Medicine for the 2018-19 school year.

This year’s School of Medicine recipients are Keaton Altom, Rico Beuford, Paige Charboneau, Austin Harris, Robert Johnson, Madeline Klaesner, Samuel Maples, Elizabeth Robin,  Adele Souter and Dylan Schwindt.

Scholarship are given annually to fourth-year medical students who are graduates of a Missouri high school.

Missouri physicians formed the MSMA in 1850 to serve as a voice for the medical profession, physicians and their patients. The organization includes a Medical Student Section that addresses issues important to students of Doctor of Medicine or Doctor of Osteopathy degree programs.

Sarah Morrison research award recipients announced

Sarah Morrison Student Research Award recipient for Spring 2018: (left to right, first row) Taylor Carter, Keerthi Gondi, Rishabh Gupta, Debolina Kanjilal; (second row) Shrusti Mehta, Nikitha Potturi, Hussain Rao, Alisha Shah; (third row) Garth Sherman, Siddhant Thukral, Jeremy Provance.

The School of Medicine Student Research Program has awarded 11 Sarah Morrison Student Research Awards for the Spring 2018 cycle. Recipients included 10 medical students and one graduate student.

Sarah Morrison awards of up to $2,500 are presented each year in April and October. More than 100 students have received an estimated $104,669 in financial support from the program to conduct research projects at the School of Medicine.

The deadlines for students interested in research who wish to be considered for one of the Sarah Morrison awards are March 1 and September. 1 each year. Applicants are reviewed by a committee of faculty judges and processed through the Office of Research Administration.

For complete application information, visit the student research website.

Spring 2018 Sarah Morrison Research Award
(Recipient / Faculty Mentor / Project title)

  • Taylor Carter, MS 5 / Miranda Huffman, M.D., associate professor of community and family medicine / The Need for Diversity: Narrative Review of Learning and Social Environment of Underrepresented Minority Medical Students at an U.S. Medical School
  • Keerthi Gondi, MS 4 / Sean Gratton, M.D., assistant professor of neurology / Prevalence, Treatment, and Outcomes of Asymptomatic Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension in a Pediatric Population
  • Rishabh Gupta, MS 3 / Peter Koulen, Ph.D., professor of basic medical science, Sabates Endowed Chair in Vision Research / Disease-mediated changes in Ca2+ channels during optic neuritis
  • Debolina Kanjilal, MS 3 / Gary Sutkin, M.D., professor of obstetrics and gynecology, Endowed Chair in Women’s Health / The Pursuit of Error-Free Surgery
  • Shrusti Mehta, MS 3 / Paula Nichols, Ph.D., professor and chair of basic medical science / Molecular and Cellular consequences of Necrotizing Enterocolitis on neurodevelopment
  • Nikitha Potturi, MS 5, David Mundy, M.D., associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology / Fetal Structural Cardiac Disease: Maternal & Neonatal Outcomes
  • Hussain Rao, MS 3, / Peter Koulen, Ph.D., professor of basic medical science, Sabates Endowed Chair in Vision Research / Pharmacological control of oxidative stress-mediated effects on endocannabinoid signaling
  • Alisha Shah, MS 3 / Peter Koulen Ph.D., professor of basic medical science, Sabates Endowed Chair in Vision Research / The role of MAPKs in innate immune system signaling in age-related macular degeneration pathogenesis
  • Garth Sherman, MS 5 / Fariha Shafi, M.D., associate professor of internal medicine / The effectiveness of BCG after local radiation therapy for Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer
  • Siddhant Thukral, MS 4, Paul Reicherter, M.D., assistant professor of internal medicine / Serum Zonulin levels as measured during a Psoriasis Flare
  • Jeremy Provance, I.Ph.D. student / Kim Smolderen, Ph.D., assistant professor of biomedical and health informatics / Studying Amputations in the Cerner Health Facts Database: Overlap with Peripheral Artery Disease, Diabetes, and Prognostic Outcomes

Stacey Algren, M.D., appointed chair of Council on Evaluation


Stacey Algren, M.D.

The School of Medicine has announced that Stacey Algren, M.D., clinical assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology, will serve as the chair of the Council on Evaluation.

Algren, a 2001 graduate of the School of Medicine, begins her new role as council chair in June, 2018. The appointment is for a seven-year term that will run through 2025.

The Council on Evaluation develops and applies policies and procedures to assess the academic and professional development of medical students as they progress through the School of Medicine. Its decisions affect the careers of our students, and the Council strives to render decisions that are consistent and in the best interests of our students and the medical program.

In 2009, Algren joined the Council on Evaluation, and most recently served as the vice-chair. She also serves as associate program director for the School of Medicine’s Obstetrics and Gynecology Residency Program and maintains a busy clinical practice at Saint Luke’s Hospital on the Plaza.

After receiving her medical degree in 2001, Algren completed her residency in obstetrics and gynecology at UMKC. She successfully completed fellowship training in pelvic surgery at Emory University. She returned to Kansas City in 2007 and joined the staff at Saint Luke’s Hospital, where she is the medical director of the Women’s Care Clinic.

The School of Medicine also recognizes the conspicuous service of Sara E. Gardner, M.D., who completed a seven-year term as Council on Evaluation chair.

SOM researchers recognized for outstanding journal article

Shui Qing Ye, M.D., Ph.D., chair and professor of Biomedical and Health Informatics, and Daniel Heruth, Ph.D., assistant professor of pediatrics, are co-authors of a paper published in Cell and Bioscience that was selected as one the journal’s outstanding papers published in 2017.

The paper, “Epigenetic regulation of Runx2 transcription and osteoblast differentiation by nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase,” was published in the May 23, 2017 edition of Cell and Bioscience. It was chosen for the 2017 Ming K Jeang Award for Excellence in Cell & Bioscience.

Ye also serves as the William R. Brown Endowed Chair in Genetics and Molecular Medicine at the School of Medicine.

School of Medicine announces inaugural chair of Department of Graduate Health Professions in Medicine

Banderas, Julie
Julie Banderas, Pharm.D.

The School of Medicine has announced that Julie Banderas, Pharm.D., will serve as the inaugural chair of the Department of Graduate Health Professions in Medicine.

Banderas is particularly qualified to serve as the chair of the department. She has served as Assistant Dean for Graduate Studies and Allied Health since 2012 and before that was Assistant Dean for Graduate Studies.

She will oversee the department as it is integrated into the School of Medicine’s strategic plans and objectives to expand graduate and professional degree programs in medicine to meet the needs of the community.

The School of Medicine currently offers three graduate medical programs that include a Master of Science in Anesthesia, a Master of Medical Science Physician Assistant, and a Master of Health Professions Education.

The Department of Graduate Health Professions in Medicine will serve as academic home for all existing and future graduate medical degree programs. It will bring organization, efficiency and structure to the strategic planning and policy decisions for these programs.

Banderas has an accomplished research, teaching, and leadership record. She provided oversight in supporting two graduate programs that recently underwent successful accreditation reviews.

Therefore, it is with the enthusiastic support of the faculty that the School of Medicine looks forward to the growth of existing graduate programs and the establishment of new programs under her leadership.

School of Medicine recognizes Class of 2018

Members of the School of Medicine Class of 2018 line up to have their names called during the Commcencement ceremony on May 21 at the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts.

In his final commencement address as UMKC School of Medicine Dean, Steven L. Kanter, M.D., applauded the Class of 2018 for its accomplishments and welcomed the graduates to the health care profession on May 21 at the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts.

The School of Medicine recognized more than 150 graduates with degrees for doctor of medicine, masters in anesthesia, bioinformatics, health professions education, physician assistants, and a graduate certificate in clinical research.

Kanter, who will assume the role of president and chief executive officer of the Association of Academic Health Centers and the Association of Academic Health Centers International (AAHCI) on July 1, reminded the graduates that they are now part of a rich legacy and long-standing tradition of outstanding alumni of the School of Medicine.

One of those alumni, Michael Hinni, M.D. ’88, spoke to the class as the 2018 E. Grey Dimond, M.D., Take Wing Award winner. A renowned surgeon and chair of the Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery at the May Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona, recounted his time at the School of Medicine how it prepared him for his current role in medicine. Specifically, to the more than 110 new physicians, he encouraged them to trust themselves and their education.

He said he was more prepared than he imagined when began his residency  because of his vast training at the School of Medicine.

“And you will be, too,” Hinni said. “So, a shout out to the School of Medicine and all of your achievements and your careers.”

2018 Student Award Winners

Master of Science Anesthesia

Jennifer Nolan | Student Ambassador Award

Master of Science Bioinformatics

Carrie Kriz | Department of Biomedical and Health Informatics Award for Excellence

Krishna Patel | Department of Biomedical and Health Informatics Award for Excellence

Doctor of Medicine

Gaurav Anand | Missouri State Medical Association Honors Graduate

Danielle Cunningham | Women in Medicine Scholarship Achievement Citation; UMKC School of Medicine Alumni Association Award for Excellence in Medical Education; Richardson K. Noback, M.D., Founders’ Award for Clinical Excellence; Thomas R. Hamilton, M.D., Award for Excellence in Microbiology; Lee Langley Award

Dorothy Daniel | Merck Manual for Outstanding Achievement in Medical Education; Women in Medicine Scholarship Achievement Citation; Bette Hamilton, M.D., Memorial Award for Excellence in Immunology

Sanju Eswaran | Merck Manual for Outstanding Achievement in Medical Education; Women in Medicine Scholarship Achievement Citation; Lee Langley Award; Richardson K. Noback, M.D., Founders’ Award for Clinical Excellence

Ravali Gummi | Ratilal S. Shah Medical Scholarship Fund; Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Honor Recipient

Ahsan Hussain | J. Michael de Ungria, M.D. Humanitarian Award

Margaret Kirwin | Thomas R. Hamilton, M.D. Award for Excellence in Pathology

Brooks Kimmis | Missouri State Medical Association Honors Graduate

Peter Lazarz | James F. Stanford, M.D. Patient Advocate Scholarship

Eric Dean Merrill | Friends of UMKC School of Medicine Award for Research

Steven Philips | UMKC School of Medicine Alumni Award Association Outstanding Senior Partner

Omar Qayum | Malhotra Family Scholarship for Academic and Clinical Excellence

Nidhi Reddy | Women in Medicine Scholarship Achievement Citation

Alexandra Reinbold | Women in Medicine Scholarship Achievement Citation

Salvador Rios | Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Award

David Sanborn | Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Honor Recipient

Meghna Singh | Friends of UMKC Harry S. Jonas, M.D., Award; Laura L. Backus, M.D. Award for Excellence in Pediatrics

Shikhar Tomur | Friends of UMKC School of Medicine Basic Science Award

Sai Vanam | ACP Senior Student Book Award

Christopher Wester | Pat D. Do, M.D., Matching Scholarship in Orthopedics

Danielle Witt | Women in Medicine Scholarship Achievement Citation; Malhotra Family Scholarship for Academic and Clinical Excellence

 

Surgical innovator Mike Hinni wins 2018 Take Wing Award

Michael Hinni, M.D. ’88, received the 2018 E. Grey Dimond, M.D., Take Wing Award from School of Medicine Dean Steven Kanter, M.D., on May 21.

“For many medical students, usually the specialty picks the person, and not the other way around,” said Michael Hinni, M.D. ’88, the 2018 winner of the E. Grey Dimond, M.D., Take Wing Award.

If that’s the case, surgery made a great choice with Hinni, a pioneer in performing and then teaching innovative head and neck surgery, all while building an academic department.

“I needed to fix things, so surgery attracted me,” Hinni said.

“When I was on an otolaryngology rotation and first walked into an OR and observed a middle ear reconstruction – using a microscope, and all its precision, so cool – I was hooked!”

School of Medicine Dean Steven Kanter, M.D., presented the award to Hinni on May 21 in Theater A as part of the annual Take Wing Award lectureship.

After Hinni graduated from UMKC’s B.A./M.D. program, his internship in general surgery and residency in otorhinolaryngology were at Mayo in Rochester, Minnesota. After that, he was hired at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona, where he now is a professor of otolaryngology and head and neck surgery and head of the Department of Otolaryngology.

He also had a year’s fellowship in Germany studying transoral laser microsurgery — surgery that removes head and neck tumors through a patient’s mouth rather than cutting through the neck and jaw. Hinni brought the technique back in 1994 and became one of the first two U.S. surgeons to use it extensively.

“There was great resistance, because head and neck tumors had always been removed by opening people up,” Hinni said. “But I ran with it, and eventually we had a record of success.”

Hinni said the surgery offers great benefits to a patient, cutting hospital stays from 10 days or two weeks to three days, greatly reducing the difficulty of recovery and allowing patients to eat and speak by avoiding a tracheostomy and extensive reconstructive surgery.

“I’m proud to have stuck it out and helped bring a less-invasive way of treating cancer to the public,” Hinni said. “Now there are minimally invasive surgeons in most academic centers throughout the country.”

Along the way has treated some well-known patients, including U.S. Sen. John McCain and Buddy Bell, the former Major League third baseman and Kansas City Royals manager.

“Senator McCain is a great man, and I know Buddy Bell is known and loved by a lot of baseball fans,” Hinni said. “It has been an honor to care for them, and all my patients.”

Hinni also built the otolaryngology program at Mayo in Arizona, which had little research or academic offerings when he first was hired.

“Building a program from scratch has been gratifying — and humbling. You don’t build something like that without great collaboration and motivated partners, but we did it.”

He built the Arizona location’s thyroid surgery practice, and Mayo Rochester residents came for some of their thyroid surgery experience. He also trained residents from the military, first from the U.S. Air Force and then the Army and the Navy.  Eventually that meant he had two residents training year-round.

In 2006 the Department of Otolaryngology Head & Neck Surgery/Audiology launched an independent otolaryngology residency program with Hinni as its founding director.

“If I retired tomorrow,” Hinni said, “starting that residency is what I would be most proud of.”

Along the way, Hinni helped design the instruments needed to accomplish better, safer surgery; contributed to the published medical literature on such topics as how much tissue needs to be removed to completely clear malignancy from the throat and surrounding areas; and presented the evidence for these medical advances at local, national and international forums.

Hinni also looked forward to returning to UMKC to receive his Take Wing Award, give the annual lecture at its presentation and address the 2018 School of Medicine graduating class.

“I made the best friends of my life,” Hinni said, ticking off names from his Class of ’88. “Jimmy Hartman and Tom McGinn, John McKenzie and Marty Emert. I had the good fortune to be roommates and hallway buddies with them on 1 North at the old 5030 Cherry Street dorm. They’re just wonderful people and caring doctors all at the top of their field.”

He also credited “my great senior support partner,” Cindy Chang, M.D. ’85, “and more great faculty members than I can name.”

“I’ve been very blessed in my career at Mayo,” Hinni said. “But UMKC was my launching pad. The camaraderie and the education were phenomenal.”

Students, residents present abstracts at annual patient safety day event

Students, residents and fellows presented 38 posters at the School of Medicine’s annual Vijay Babu Rayudu Quality and Patient Safety Day on May 11.

Students, residents and fellows presented a record number of 35 research abstracts related to quality improvement and patient safety during the School of Medicine’s Fifth Annual Vijay Babu Rayudu Quality and Patient Safety Day on May 11.

The event also consisted of a series of workshops and talks for faculty on subjects including hospital transitions of care activities,  incorporating simulation and human factors analysis into health care training, and making educational and clinical training count twice.

Carolyn Clancy, M.D., executive in charge, Veterans Health Administration, left, was the keynote speaker for the 2018 Quality and Patient Safety Day.

Carolyn Clancy, M.D., Veterans Health Administration Executive in Charge, gave the keynote speech at noon. Clancy talked about the stride the Veterans Administration has made in providing health care for veterans and how it is a leader in health care innovations.

The afternoon sessions were reserved for oral presentations and poster presentations by students, residents and fellows.

The top two student and top two resident/fellow abstracts were selected for oral presentations. Fifth-year students Laura Meidl and Nyaluma Wagala were selected for student oral presentations. Omar Abughanimeh, M.D., and Talal Asif, M.D., gave the oral presenations by a residents/fellows.

The top poster presentation awards were given to Salvador Rios, sixth-year student, for student poster, and Punita Grover, M.D., for resident/fellow poster. Second-place winners were Cindy Jiang, fifth-year student, and Parth Patel, M.D.

Top Prize Oral Presentations
Students
Laura Meidl, MS5; Ashley Cooper, MD; Kelli Zuckerman, RN; Julia Harris, MD: Improved Influenza Vaccination Rates Among Immunosuppressed Patients in Pediatric Rheumatology Clinic
Nyaluma Wagala, MS5; Emily Boschert, MS4: Alcohol Intoxication and Orthopedic Trauma: Who Provides the Counseling?
Resident/Fellows:
Omar Abughanimeh, MD; Guy Fogg, MD; Bo Song, MD; Laith Numan, MD; Moustafa Younis, MD; Solomon Kim, MD; Ayman Qasrawi, MD; Noel Torres-Acosta, MD; Kristin Gillenwater, MD: Improving Diabetic Retinopathy Screening In Internal Medicine Clinics
Talal Asif, MD; Rehman Ukani, MD; Laith Derbas, MD; Ahmed Elkaryoni, MD; Zara Wadood, MD; Lauren Misher, PharmD; Jeane Johnson, PharmD; Julie Banderas, PharmD; David Wooldridge, MD: Reducing 30-Day Readmission Rates of COPD Exacerbations: A Comprehensive Management Approach

Poster Presentations
Students
First place: Salvador Rios, MS6, Amy Stubbs, MD; Monica Gaddis, PhD; Jason Hurt, MD: Are Women Diagnosed with ACS Under-Triaged?
Second Place:  Cindy Jiang, MS5, Niraj Madhani, MS5; Binoy Shah, MS5: The Utility Of Procalcitonin Levels in the Detection and Diagnosis of Viridans streptococci Endocarditis
Residents/Fellows
First
Place: Punita Grover, MD; Eslam Dosokey, MD; Nikita Maniar, MD; Tarana Gill, MD; Siva Taduru, MD; Ashley Tatum, MD; Ginger Jenkins, PhD; Sheena Spielberg, MD; Julie Banderas, PharmD; David Wooldridge, MD; Kristin Gillenwater, DO: Standardizing the Process of Ordering Screening Mammograms in Primary Care Clinics.
Second Place:  Parth Patel, MD; Walen Bahaj, MD; Badar Hasan, MD; Marjan Nazer, MD; Robin Imperial, MD; Ellen Troudt, MD; Ahmed Elkafrawy, MD, Julie Banderas, PharmD; David Wooldridge, MD, Kristin Gillenwater, DO: Improving Rate of Screening Mammograms Completed at TMC-HH

UMKC bioinformatics degree propels Mir to prominent fellowship

Fahad Faisal Mir, M.D., says earning a master’s degree in bioinformatics at the UMKC School of Medicine helped him land a fellowship in advanced endoscopy at Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital and Harvard Medical School.

Three years ago, Fahad Faisal Mir, M.D., decided to follow his internal medicine residency at the UMKC School of Medicine and Truman Medical Center with a three-year fellowship in gastroenterology. He didn’t stop there.

When Mir completes his fellowship in May, he will also graduate from the School of Medicine’s Master of Science in Bioinformatics program with an emphasis in clinical research.

It’s an added touch that he believes gave him the advantage in landing a one-year fellowship in advanced endoscopy at the prestigious Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston beginning in July.

“Programs like these, Johns Hopkins, Harvard, they’re looking for people who are good at what they do clinically,” Faisal said. “But they’re also looking for someone who has an extra edge, and I think having this degree and background gave me that extra edge that I needed.”

His experience in the bioinformatics program has helped Mir to look at research projects and their results with a more critical eye. He is confident that will help him become a better physician going forward.

“Physicians who aren’t trained in bioinformatics or biostatistics read research differently,” he said. “They’re looking at the results, the conclusion and the applicability. I feel like I can look at the research methods that were used and see how the study was done; what populations it was done on; does it apply to the patients I see; are the results accurate in what they’re describing?”

The research training worked hand in hand with his gastroenterology fellowship.

“Our bioinformatics program is structured very well,” Mir said. “I did it over three years. They worked with me to where I could do classes online as much as possible and do group discussions. I didn’t feel like I was missing out on much by not physically going to classes.”

Mir said he was able to incorporate the gastroenterology research studies he worked on throughout his fellowship into his work in the bioinformatics program. That research training, Mir said, has given him the confidence to design his own studies. He has designed and worked on three randomized control trials, two multi-center trials, and several other retrospective studies during the past year.

And that has him thinking to the future of returning to his native country to begin his own research program. Mir came to Kansas City six years ago for post-graduate medical training after earning his medical degree in Pakistan.

“I want to start a research institute there and I think this is going to help form a foundation for that,” he said. “There is a need for medical research in Pakistan. If I can go into an established system that doesn’t have a really well established research arm, I can start doing high-quality research and be known for that. I’m at the early stages of that now.”