All posts by Kelly Edwards

Chelladurai presenting AAMC program on professional development for student affairs

Cary Chelladurai, manager of student affairs at the School of Medicine, is working with the AAMC to present its professional Development Initiative to medical school student affairs leaders across the country.

More than 20 new medical schools have opened in the United States in the last 10 years, including a dozen in the past five years alone. And more are on the way.

As manager of the UMKC School of Medicine Office of Student Affairs, Cary Chelladurai understands some of the unique challenges student affairs leaders will face in establishing and maintaining their own departments.

Chelladurai has been working with the Association of American Medical Colleges since earlier this year, sharing its Professional Development Initiative program with other medical school student affairs associate deans, department managers and supervisors.

The AAMC is made of up of all 151 accredited medical schools in the United States and 17 in Canada. In 2016, the national organization’s Group on Student Affairs crafted the Professional Development Initiative to support its members’ student affairs offices.

After attending the AAMC’s first professional development workshop at a national meeting in 2016 and participating in subsequent webinars, Chelladurai implemented the program’s tools at the UMKC School of Medicine.

“We used them with restructuring our office,” said Chelladurai, who has served in her current position since 2012. “We’ve used them with rewriting job descriptions and, being short-staffed, deciding what duties are most important. It’s a framework and a tool that helps us figure that out so we don’t have to do it from scratch.”

Last February, the AAMC asked Chelladurai and a colleague at the University of Alabama to serve as subject matter experts on the program and present it to others at medical schools across the country. The two teamed up to present the material to about 30 student affairs leaders at the AAMC’s national conference in April.

They began offering a series of three online virtual classroom video conferences earlier this summer. The series provides interactive and collaborative discussions and personalized case studies that explore challenges that student affairs departments have faced. The first online video conference took place in July with following sessions slated for September and October.

The entire program highlights eight specific areas of focus for student affairs offices. It also provides a support network for making programs relative in a changing environment and to help student affairs professionals realize their own potential and career fulfillment.

“We’re talking to our colleagues across the country, telling them how we have personally used this program and giving them ideas about how they can use it at their own medical schools,” Chelladurai said. “It’s helpful to the new medical schools that haven’t developed their student affairs departments yet but they’re in their planning stages. They can use it to make sure they have someone covering all the areas of focus.”

It’s also beneficial to more established student affairs offices that are working to find new and better ways to serve their student populations.

“This information and the tools are free and they’re online, so even if a school can’t afford to send someone to a conference, they can benefit from these tools,” Chelladurai said. “That’s one of the good things about the virtual classroom series. They don’t have to travel. We’re teaching this to 25 of our colleagues across the country. They just need to tune in for a couple of hours three times and they’re getting the professional development instead of spending the money and time travelling to a conference.”

Summer Scholars puts area students on track for careers in health care

Students from Kansas City area high schools took part in the 38th year of the UMKC School of Medicine Summer Scholars Program in July.

Sade-joy Dugbo had an idea that a career in health care might be part of her future. After spending the last week of July in the UMKC School of Medicine’s Advance Summer Scholars program, she’s convinced.

As she prepared for her senior year at Kansas City’s Notre Dame de Sion High School, Dugbo joined a group of nearly 85 area high school juniors and seniors taking part in a one- or two-week experience in the health care profession.

“Actually, seeing what it’s like to be a medical student, seeing first-hand what they do, what the doctors do, has really changed my view of what the medical field is like,” Dugbo said.

Didactic classroom sessions are part of the two-week Summer Scholars experience.

For 38 years, the Summer Scholars program has provided minority and disadvantaged students in the Kansas City metropolitan area the opportunity to find out first-hand what a career in health care looks like. The program also prepares them to be successful as they move from high school to college.

Students take part in a two-week session of Summer Scholars each July during which they receive daily instruction in academic areas such as chemistry and language arts, and study anatomy and physiology in the school’s cadaver lab. Classroom experiences range from medical terminology and understanding health disparities to ACT and standardized test taking.

Those who complete the two-week session can return the following summer to take part in the Advanced Summer Scholars, which provides additional experiences in different medical services such as emergency and outpatient medicine, rehabilitation, and nursing. This year’s advanced group was treated to additional hospital experiences including viewing surgeries in the operating room and shadowing students and physicians at Children’s Mercy Kansas City.

The experience for advanced scholars was broken into two one-week sessions this year in order to allow more students to take part. Dugbo was part of the first session of Advanced Summer Scholars.

“The ability to shadow the doctors and see the students in the hospitals was huge because I got to see how they interact with patients and what their daily lives were like,” she said.

The hospital experiences opened the eyes of Emily Reed, a senior at Winnetonka High School who was also part of the Advanced Summer Scholars.

“Last year it was more time learning chemistry and biology,” she said. “This year, there’s a lot more time in the hospital where last year it was mainly shadowing medical students in the clinic. The good thing about this program is that it showed me a variety of areas of medicine. I thought I was dead set on going into one area of medicine because I’ve always been interested in surgery. But now, it’s going to be a matter of seeing how many choices I have and what decision I’m going to make in the future.”

Dugbo said that it’s still too early to say what field of medicine she’d like to enter or where she will go to school in the future, but her experiences these past two summers has made her sure of one thing. Her plan is to start looking into pre-medical school programs soon, and that includes applying to the UMKC School of Medicine.

“We learned this is what you’ll be doing in medical school, this is what you’ll be doing after medical school. It’s really solidified what I want to do in the future,” Dugbo said. “Now, it’s 100 percent, I want do something in the medical field because I’ve loved this experience.”

Kansas City Marathon offers UMKC School of Medicine discount

The UMKC School of Medicine is serving as a Gold Sponsor of the 2018 Kansas City Marathon, and race organizers are excited to offer a 15 percent discount on race registration fees to all  faculty, staff, students and residents. This year’s event will take place on Oct. 20 with four race distances to chose from — 5K, 10K, half marathon or full marathon.

The discount code can be used for any of the KC Marathon’s race distances. The event is open to walkers as well as runners.

To get the discount, simply copy and paste or enter 15OFF2018KCM in the “Got a discount code?” box near the end of the online registration process at www.kcmarathon.org. Please note that this discount code is case sensitive. It must be entered exactly as it appears.

Why should you participate in the Kansas City Marathon on October 20?

  • This is Kansas City’s largest and most exciting race. It gives runners a tour of the city’s most beautiful landmarks and interesting neighborhoods, including the World War I Memorial, the Country Club Plaza, the Nelson Atkins Museum of Art, Waldo, Westport, 18th & Vine and more.
  • The race has distance options for all fitness levels with a 5K, 10K, half marathon and full marathon.
  • There are fireworks to kick off the race and a huge after party with live music, free food and free beer!
  • All runners will receive a participant shirt, a large finisher’s medal, free downloadable race photos and more.
  • After you conquer the Kansas City hills, you’ll be rewarded with a lightning-fast downhill finish that includes a breathtaking view of the Kansas City skyline!
  • Still not sure? Click here to check out their 2017 recap video to learn what the Kansas City Marathon is all about.

Children’s Mercy selects new president, CEO

Paul Kempinski

Children’s Mercy Kansas City, a primary teaching hospital of the UMKC School of Medicine, announced Paul Kempinski, MS, FACHE, as its next President and Chief Executive Officer, effective November 1.

Kempinski serves as President of Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children (N/AIDHC) in Wilmington, Delaware. Additionally, he serves as Enterprise Vice President for the Nemours Children’s Health System.

At Nemours, he is responsible for the daily operations of the 200-bed institution, a Magnet-designated hospital that is recognized among the top children’s hospitals in the nation by U.S. News & World Report. He previously served as Operational Vice President for Nemours Children’s Health System and Chief Operating Officer of N/AIDHC. Kempinski’s many accomplishments at Nemours include a 450,000-square-foot hospital expansion in 2014.

Kempinski will replace Randall L. O’Donnell, PhD., who has served as President and CEO of Children’s Mercy since 1993.

Saint Luke’s Health System CEO chosen as 2020 chair of American Hospital Association

    Saint Luke’s Hospital of Kansas City
Melinda Estes, M.D.

Melinda Estes, M.D., president and CEO of Saint Luke’s Health System in Kansas City, has been selected chair-elect designate of the American Hospital Association by the association’s Board of Directors.

As the 2020 chair, she will become the top-elected official of the national organization that represents America’s hospitals and health systems, while working to advance health in America.

Saint Luke’s Hospital of Kansas City has a long-standing partnership with the UMKC School of Medicine, serving as one of the school’s primary teaching hospitals.

A board-certified neurologist and neuropathologist, Estes has served as president and CEO of Saint Luke’s Health System since 2011. She oversees the operations of the system, the Kansas City region’s only locally-owned, not-for-profit, faith-based, aligned health system, which includes 16 hospitals and campuses, home care and hospice, adolescent and adult behavioral health facilities, well over 100 physician practices and retail clinics, life care senior living communities, and a college of health sciences.

The AHA is a not-for-profit association of nearly 5,000 hospitals, health care systems and networks, and 43,000 individual members committed to improving health in their communities. Founded in 1898, the association provides education for health care leaders and information on health care issues and trends.

School of Medicine welcomes new docent to Blue 1 unit

Rishi Sharma, M.D.

The School of Medicine welcomed Rishi Sharma, M.D., M.H.S.A., to the faculty as the new docent for the Blue 1 unit on July 1.

In addition to his role as assistant professor of internal medicine at the School of Medicine, he will also serve as a research associate in cardiovascular and renal research at the Kansas City VA Medical Center.

Before joining the School of Medicine, Sharma served two years as a hospitalist at Overland Park Regional Medical Center in Overland Park, Kansas. He has also served as a hospitalist and director of cardiopulmonary services at St. Catherine Hospital in Garden City, Kansas.

Sharma brings a research background, having served as a research assistant at the Midwest Biomedical Research Foundation in Kansas City.

He came to the United States after earning his medical degree from the Guwahati Medical College in India. He received a master’s in health services administration at the Kansas University Medical Center, then completed his internal medicine residency at Nassau University Medical Center in East Meadow, New York. There, he was recognized as Intern of the Year.

In addition, Sharma served as chief resident at Nassau University, and as an instructor for Introduction to Clinical Medicine at the State University of New York-Stony Brook.

The author of many research posters, presentations and journal articles, Sharma is also a member of many health care societies including the American Heart Association, Doctors for America and the American College of Health Care Executives.

Bioinformatics grad wins travel grant to present research at clinical chemistry meeting

Shivani Sivasankar

Shivani Sivasankar has been awarded a travel grant from the American Association for Clinical Chemistry. She is a 2018 graduate of the School of Medicine’s master’s program in biomedical and health informatics.

The honor is a competitive award given to students who are the lead authors of research abstracts accepted for presentation at the association’s annual meeting. The association is an organization of more than 10,000 world-wide scientific and medical professionals dedicated to clinical laboratory science and its application to health care.

Sivasankar will present her research at the organization’s 2018 national meeting in Chicago on July 29. She is one of only 15 students selected from an international pool of applicants for the grant.

Her research abstract is titled “Use of National EHR Data Warehouse to Identify Inappropriate HbA1C Orders for Sickle-Cell Patients.” The project used information culled from Health Facts, a database of big data provided by Cerner in collaboration with UMKC and Truman Medical Centers.

Sivasankar plans to continue her research studies at the School of Medicine in the fall when she enters the Interdisciplinary Ph.D. program with a primary discipline in bioinformatics.

School of Medicine seeks nominations for annual awards

The School of Medicine is accepting nominations until Aug. 1 for four faculty, staff and student awards. These will recognize achievements in diversity and health equity, mentoring, medical education research and teaching.

The Excellence in Diversity and Health Equity in Medicine Awards recognize an individual or organization that has demonstrated sustained and impactful contribution to diversity, inclusion and cultural competency or health equity. The award is given to a student or student organization, and to faculty, staff, resident and/or organization/department.

Nominees should be those who have made consistent contributions to diversity, inclusion, cultural competency or health equity through one or more of the following:

o Recruiting or retaining a diverse student or faculty body;
o Fostering an inclusive environment for success of all;
o Working to promote health equity and the elimination of health disparities;
o Strengthening efforts to develop or implement cultural competency strategies that improve health-care delivery.

Nomination materials should be sent to the attention of Dr. Nate Thomas, Associate Dean for Diversity and Inclusion at thomasen@umkc.edu

Two Betty M. Drees, M.D., Excellence in Mentoring Awards are presented each year. The Lifetime Achievement in Mentoring Award is for a faculty member with the rank of professor. The Excellence in Mentoring Award goes to a faculty member who is either an associate or assistant professor.

The awards recognize the significant contributions mentors make to enhance and develop the careers of our faculty and trainees. Characteristics of successful mentoring include generosity, listening, objectivity, and constructive feedback regarding career and professional/personal development.

The third annual Louise E. Arnold, Ph.D., Excellence in Medical Education Research Award will be given to a tenure track or non-tenure track faculty member who has contributed to innovation and scholarship related to medical education at UMKC School of Medicine for a minimum of five years.

The second annual Christopher Papasian, Ph.D., Excellence in Teaching Award will be given to a tenure track or nontenure track faculty member who has contributed to medical student pre-clinical education.

Nominations for the mentoring, medical education research and teaching awards should be sent to Dr. Rebecca R. Pauly, chair, selection committee, at paulyr@umkc.edu.

Winners of the awards will be announced on Sept. 13th during the annual Faculty Promotion and Awards reception at 4 p.m. in Theater B.

Past award recipients:

Excellence in Diversity and Health Equity in Medicine Awards
Individual:
2015 Jim Stanford
2016 Fariha Shafi
2017 Briana Woods-Jaeger
Organization:
2015 Asian Pacific American Medical Student Association
2016 Asian Pacific American Medical Student Association
2017 Gender Pathways

Betty M. Drees, M.D. Excellence in Mentoring Awards
Lifetime Achievement Awards:
2014 Vidya Sharma
2015 John Foxworth
2016 Agostino Molteni
2017 Julie Strickland

Excellence in Mentoring Awards:
2014 Simon Kaja
2015 Vincent Barone
2016 Pamela Nicklaus
2017 Brenda Rogers

Louise E. Arnold, Ph.D., Excellence in Medical Education Research Award
2016 Louise Arnold
2017 Stefanie Ellison

Christopher Papasian, Ph.D., Excellence in Teaching Research
2017 Christopher Papasian

Reception planned for retiring Education Team Coordinator Mary Pirotte

Senior Education Team Coordinator Mary Pirotte, a longtime staff member of the Office of Student Affairs, will retire from the School of Medicine at the end of June.

Pirotte has served as ETC for the Blue unit for the last 14 years. She started as an education assistant for the Gold unit in 1989. During her time at the school, she has been a member of the curriculum council and the evaluation council. And she has worked with every dean of the medical school in some capacity.

A reception is planned from 3:30-5 p.m. on June 28 in the fifth-floor Biomedical and Health Informatics conference room, M5-103.

Missouri medical association awards scholarships to UMKC students

School of Medicine recipients of Missouri State Medical Association scholarships are: (front row, left to right) Rico Beuford, Austin Harris, Adele Souter, Elizabeth Robin, Paige Charboneau. (Back row) Fred Hahn, M.D., MSMA representative, Dylan Schwindt, Robert Johnson, Keaton Altom, Samuel Maples. Not pictured: Madeline Klaesner

The Missouri State Medical Association recently awarded scholarships to 10 students at the UMKC School of Medicine for the 2018-19 school year.

This year’s School of Medicine recipients are Keaton Altom, Rico Beuford, Paige Charboneau, Austin Harris, Robert Johnson, Madeline Klaesner, Samuel Maples, Elizabeth Robin,  Adele Souter and Dylan Schwindt.

Scholarships are given annually to fourth-year medical students who are graduates of a Missouri high school.

Missouri physicians formed the MSMA in 1850 to serve as a voice for the medical profession, physicians and their patients. The organization includes a Medical Student Section that addresses issues important to students of Doctor of Medicine or Doctor of Osteopathy degree programs.