All posts by Kelly Edwards

Local Wall of Respect coming to UMKC campuses

The Wall of Respect, a 12-foot yurt representing the diversity of cultures in Kansas City, is coming to the UMKC Health Sciences campus Feb. 4-8.

Fifty-one years ago, a group of Chicago artists created a community mural called the Wall of Respect that revitalized the neighborhood in the city’s South Side. Last year, in the same spirit, Kansas City’s Jewish Community Center created its own Wall of Respect to celebrate the diversity of cultures in the community.

That project, a 12-foot yurt decorated by local artists, will be on display in the third-floor atrium of the UMKC Health Sciences Building for one week beginning Feb. 4. The following week, Feb. 11-15, the yurt will be set up at UMKC’s Student Union.

Wall of RespectA yurt is a circular tent typically made of felt or animal skins mounted on a collapsible frame. The local Wall of Respect project was decorated by artists representing the African American, Jewish, Asian American, Latinx/Hispanic and Native American cultures that enhance the diversity of Kansas City. Murals are painted inside and outside the yurt as well as on the roof.

Tamica Lige is chair of the Health Sciences Diversity and Inclusion Council that is bringing Kansas City’s Wall of Respect to the university’s two campuses. The council is made up of representatives of the UMKC schools of Dentistry, Medicine, Nursing and Health Studies, and Pharmacy, Children’s Mercy, Saint Luke’s Health System and Truman Medical Center.

“This is a good way for us to be involved with not only spreading the message of diversity, but also an appreciation of the arts,” Lige said. “It’s exciting that we can bring this community piece that represents diversity and inclusion in Kansas City to our campuses.”

Lige said cutout handprints will be available for visitors to decorate and hang inside the yurt to share their own ideas and stories of culture.

Jill Maidhof, director of the Jewish Community Center, will lead a walking tour and give a presentation on the yurt at noon on Wednesday, Feb. 6, at the Health Sciences Building.

The yurt display is coming to UMKC as a leadup to the Health Sciences Diversity and Inclusion Council’s annual Harmony Gala event on Feb. 16. The annual dance event is a scholarship fundraiser for underrepresented minority students at the health sciences schools. Registration is still available online at umkcalumni.com/harmonygala.

“This is the perfect time to bring the yurt to campus, in conjunction with the Harmony Gala,” Lige said. “It’s about diversity, it’s inclusion, it’s recognizing disparities and trying to address them. It’s a way to visually represent where we want to go in representing the various cultures of our community within our schools.”

Lige said this will be the first time the yurt has visited UMKC.

“It’s exciting to have it at both campuses,” she said. “We’re looking forward to sharing it with the Volker campus. The majority of what we do is focused on students here on the health sciences campus. This gives us an opportunity to serve the greater student population of UMKC and that’s really rewarding.”

Research Summit posters, abstracts due March 27

Organizers of the annual UMKC Health Sciences Student Research Summit are encouraging students to submit their abstracts and posters to participate in this year’s event.

The 2019 summit will take place from 3-5 p.m. on April 17 at the UMKC Student Union, Room 401. Deadline for submissions is March 27.

The research summit fosters research collaborations across disciplines and school that will produce economic, health, education and quality-of-life benefits for the greater Kansas City community. It is an opportunity for students to present their research to School of Medicine faculty.

Students must submit  their abstracts through the REDCap Submission Portal at https://is.gd/2019HSSRS. Posters must be submitted by email to the School of Medicine’s Office of Research Administration at hsdresearch@umkc.edu.

A School of Medicine poster template and complete poster guidelines are available online through the Office of Research Administration. Students may have their poster layouts reviewed by John Foxworth, Pharm. D. prior to submitting their poster to the research office. He can be contacted at FoxworthJ@umkc.edu.

Students can also sign up for a time to practice their presentations by sending an email to the research office at hsdresearch@umkc.edu.

The School of Medicine sponsors individual awards for medical students and its graduate students.

This is the seventh year that the schools are participating in the program at one venue on the Volker Campus. Last year, 50 students from the School of Medicine’s M.D. and Allied Health programs presented 45 posters at the research summit.

Health Sciences
Student Research Summit
Important links

Submissions Due: March 27
REDCap Submission Portal: https://is.gd/2019HSSRS

Research Poster Template: http://med.umkc.edu/docs/research/HSSRS_2019_poster_template.pptx
SOM Office of Student Research: hsdresearch@umkc.edu
Poster review with Dr. Foxworth: FoxworthJ@umkc.edu
Additional information: Courtney Dixon / 816-235-5366 /hsdresearch@umkc.edu

 

Revered UMKC professor, clinician honored by family

A recent contribution to the UMKC Foundation from the family of former School of Medicine faculty member Larry Pibenga, M.D., will support a research study on corneal calcification, led by Peter Koulen, Ph.D., endowed chair and co-director of vision research.

Colleagues who knew Larry Piebenga, MD, speak of him with true regard as both a mentor and role model for medical research, education and patient care.  A legendary ophthalmologist and teacher at UMKC, Piebenga was a pioneer for developing cornea and cataract therapies.

“Many of the ophthalmology techniques used today were first developed and implemented in clinics by Dr. Piebenga,” says Peter Koulen, PhD, UMKC professor and the Felix and Carmen Sabates Missouri Endowed Chair in Vision Research. “Our faculty members still try to emulate him.”

Dr. Pibenga

“Dr. Piebenga was my mentor during my residency at UMKC,” says Timothy Walline, MD, assistant professor in UMKC’s Department of Ophthalmology. “His calm, caring manner inspired me then, and not a week goes by that I don’t fondly recall something he taught me. His sincere approach to each and every patient has been my guidepost in 25 years of practice and academic endeavors.”

“He always did the right thing no matter what the work involved was and cared for every patient no matter who they were,” says Abraham Poulose MD, FACS, associate professor in UMKC’s Department of Ophthalmology. “I have aspired to live my life, both personally and professionally, to the example that he set.”

In memory of Piebenga, his family has made a contribution to the UMKC Foundation to support a research study on corneal calcification, led by Koulen. The basic science study hopes to find ways of more precisely assessing corneal calcification and determining how changes that occur from the condition affect the ability to accurately diagnose eye diseases.

“This is potentially a high-impact study that affects the outcome of many patients,” says Koulen. “By properly diagnosing their condition, we can work to develop new therapies for eye diseases that affect patients’ vision.”

Koulen said he is excited that Piebenga’s family is making this gift to honor his legacy and hopes it inspires others to honor their loved ones with similar tributes.

“Dr. Piebenga was a true advocate of research funding and he put that commitment into action,” says Koulen.  “As an avid philanthropist, he supported vision research at the UMKC Foundation, and the family’s gift showcases the mindset of Dr. Piebenga – that research is essential to our mission.”

He says their contribution also fills a critical gap for research funding as public funds are very competitive and are dwindling. “Donor gifts for small, initial studies such as this can lead to major funding for larger studies down the road,” he says.

“Research hinges on new discoveries, and philanthropy is a critical key in this process.”

UMKC Gold Humanism Honor Society welcomes 2019 class

The School of Medicine’s Gold Humanism Honor Society welcomed its 2019 members during an induction ceremony on Jan. 26 at Diastole.

The School of Medicine’s Gold Humanism Honor Society recognized 34 new members during its annual induction ceremony on Jan. 26 at Diastole. This year’s class includes 20 students, 11 residents or fellows, and three faculty members.

One faculty member, Matt Gratton, M.D., professor and chair of emergency medicine, was also recognized as the recipient of this year’s Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine Award.

This is the 16th consecutive year that the UMKC chapter has inducted new members into the national organization. Students are selected from nominations made by colleagues. Faculty, residents and fellows are chosen based on their excellence in clinical care, leadership, compassion and dedication to service. All members are selected for their exemplary care of patients and their humanistic approach to clinical practice.

With support from the Gold Foundation, the School of Medicine established its chapter of the honor society in 2004. A Graduate Medical Education chapter was added in 2014 specifically for School of Medicine residents.

Carol Stanford, M.D., associate professor of medicine and docent, serves as faculty sponsor for school’s chapter of the honor society. Stanford recognized each of this year’s inductees during the ceremony.

The School of Medicine chapter of the honor society serve as an ambassador to the school and Truman Medical Center in providing students, residents and fellows with opportunities to serve others.

Established in 2002 by the Arnold P. Gold Foundation, the Gold Humanism Honor Society has more than 30,000 members nationally in training or practice. It recognizes 149 undergraduate medical education and 14 graduate medical education chapters at medical schools throughout the country.

Members are viewed by their peers as role models for humanistic care within their communities. The society also provides educational events, supports research, promotes professional growth and creates networking opportunities.

2019 Gold Humanism Honor Society

Students
Ariana Fotouhi
Elsa George
Chizitam Ibezim
Akash Jani
Athira Jayan
Jessica Kieu
Anusha Kodidhi
Taylor Lind
Robert Link
Rmaah Memon
Anthony Oyekan
Zach Randall
Adithi Reddy
Michele Sun
Erica Swanson
Brandon Trandai
Krishna Trivedi
Nicole Underwood
Jennifer Vu
Timothy Weber

Residents / Fellows
Islam Abdelkarim (Internal Medicine)
Waled Bahaj (Internal Medicine)
Scott Biggerstaff (Internal Medicine/Pediatrics)
Clarence Dye (Emergency Medicine)
Suguni Loku Galappaththy (Internal Medicine)
Robert Garner (Pediatrics)
Kristen Jones (Internal Medicine/Pediatrics)
Shahryar Khan (Internal Medicine)
Peter Lazarz (Community and Family Medicine)
Lyla Saeed (Internal Medicine)
Jared Willard (Internal Medicine/Pediatrics)

Faculty
Matt Gratton, M.D., (TMC) GHHS and Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine Award recipient
Daniel Pauly, M.D. (TMC)
Brandt Wible, M.D. (Saint Luke’s Hospital)

School of Medicine welcomes two new staff members

The School of Medicine recently welcomed two new staff members.

Kelli Delaney has joined the Office of Research Administration as a new grants support specialist. Cynthia Flanagan is a new Clinical Medical Librarian in the Health Sciences Library.

Kelli Delaney

Beginning in 2019, the school’s research administration department will also be supporting the UMKC School of Nursing and Health Studies for grant proposals and awards. Delaney joins the department as it transition to supporting both schools.

Delaney comes to UMKC from Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, where she worked in the Northwestern Materials Science and Engineering department for 10 years. Her previous experience includes research administration, event planning and general assistance to grant project principal investigators.

A graduate of UMKC with a bachelor’s degree in English, Delaney is located in the Research Administration Department in the School of Medicine 4th floor, Blue unit.  She can be reached at kvdq2x@umkc.edu  or at 235-6453.

Cynthia Flanagan

Flanagan comes to UMKC with many years of experience in teaching, instruction, and outreach from a variety of library settings. She has a wealth of library skills including interlibrary loan, reference, cataloging, storage, retrieval, research assistance, and assessment.

Most recently, she worked as the Science, Nursing, and Allied Health faculty liaison, Reference and Instruction Librarian, at Harrisburg Area Community College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania.  While there she was recognized for her keen focus on both virtual and classroom instruction, and her dedication to student development.

Flanagan graduated with her MLIS from the University of South Carolina. She subsequently worked in many diverse library settings including the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological Survey and the Environmental Protection Agency.

She began her work as a CML at the School of Medicine in January and will be working with the Red & Green teams. She can be reached at flanagancd@umkc.edu or 235-1884.

Dr. Robert Riss selected as assistant dean for career advising

The School of Medicine has announced that Robert Riss, M.D., associate professor of pediatrics and pediatric hospitalist at Children’s Mercy Kansas City, will serve as the next assistant dean for career advising.

In his new role at the School of Medicine, Riss will be responsible for oversight of all career advising services.

Riss is an associate director of medical student education and director of curriculum for the highly regarded pediatric clerkship at Children’s Mercy. His leadership in revising the pediatric clerkship curriculum using a scholarly approach and innovative facilitation of technology is cited as a reason for improved performance of students taking their NBME exams.

He has served on many leadership committees at UMKC and Childrens’ Mercy and currently serves as co-chair of the Medical Student Education Special Interest Group with the Academic Pediatric Association. He is also a faculty member of the association after recently completing the organization’s Educational Scholars Program.

Riss has received many awards for teaching and leadership including UMKC’s Elmer F. Pierson Good Teaching Award, as well as the Children’s Mercy Gold Apple Mercy Mentor Award and a faculty award for outstanding teaching support of student medical education.

He currently participates in educational research focusing on curriculum design, evaluation and implementation utilizing technology. He is an educational consultant on the NIH grant: SPeCTRE: The Sunflower Pediatric Clinical Trials Research Extension in which he is charged with designing a curriculum for primary care physicians to increase the research capacity for pediatrics in the state of Kansas.

Riss received his medical degree from the University of Kansas School of Medicine and completed his postdoctoral training as a pediatrics resident at Children’s Mercy Kansas City.

 

Students invited to submit abstracts for Osler Society poster presentation

Medical students are invited by the Office of Medical Humanities to submit abstracts for a poster presentation on March 26 at the School of Medicine’s Osler Society Spring Event.

Abstracts should be no longer than one page and should mirror the content of your poster. It should begin with the complete title, the names of all coauthors, and the corresponding author’s mailing address, telephone number, and e-mail address. Authors and coauthors will be asked to give a short poster presentation. If a large number of entries are received, not all will present.

Abstracts should be sent by e-mail to Steven D. Waldman, M.D., J.D., associate dean and chair of medical humanities and bioethics, at waldmans@umkc.edu no later than March 1, 2019. Poster guidelines and template will be sent once the poster abstract has been received.

The theme for this year’s UMKC William Osler Poster Presentation is The Quotable Osler. Sir William Osler was one of the most prolific authors of his time, producing more than 1,600 writings including “The Principles and Practice of Medicine,” considered to be one of the first comprehensive textbooks of modern medicine. One hundred years after his death, his pronouncements on medical issues are still considered good medicine and are often quoted to illustrate the right way to care for patients.

Students should feel free to pick their favorite or least favorite Osler quote and opine on it, draw it, paint it, sculpt it, photograph it, sing it, act it, dance it, or present whatever strikes your fancy.  Be Creative Because Everything Osler Is Fair Game.

Prizes will be awarded for the top three places.

For additional information, please contact Sarah McKee at hallse@umkc.edu.

Researcher Karl Kador receives Research to Prevent Blindness award

Karl Kador, Ph.D.

School of Medicine researcher Karl Kador, Ph.D.,  has received a $75,000 award from the Research to Prevent Blindness/Stavros Niarchos Foundation International Research Collaborators.

The grant is intended to support and promote international collaborations among researchers in the United States and abroad to gain new scientific knowledge and skills through activities within the department of ophthalmology. A researcher at the UMKC Vision Research Center, Kador has been working to develop a novel approach for treating patients suffering end-stage glaucoma.

Last year, Kador received a nearly $2-million National Institutes of Health grant to explore tissue engineering that could one day lead to a method of transplanting new retinal ganglion cells to replace old, dead cells.

The Research to Prevent Blindness award allows researchers to spend time working with one another to advance specific research goals. These international collaborations can have a positive impact on a world-wide population. They have the potential to speed the development of treatments for illnesses that lead to blindness.

SOM faculty, Children’s Mercy hospital spotlighted in TV documentary

School of Medicine faculty and partner hospital Children’s Mercy Kansas City return to the spotlight on Jan. 27 and Jan. 30 for Season 3 of Inside Pediatrics.

The Emmy Award-winning documentary looks at world-class pediatric health care through the stories of patients and their families from the Kansas City area and beyond, and the professionals who take care of them. Actor Paul Rudd, a Kansas City area native, is narrator for the series that will air at 6 p.m. on Jan. 27 and at 7 p.m. on Jan. 30 on KMBC Channel 9.

These episodes feature brave families who have allowed cameras to follow them and capture their heartwarming and sometimes heartbreaking moments.

View the Season 3 trailer at https://www.facebook.com/InsidePediatrics/videos/1844276945698313.

All of the episodes and additional bonus video are available on the web site at www.InsidePediatrics.com. Viewers can also visit www.facebook.com/InsidePediatrics for information and to share their thoughts and support.