LaGrece joins SOM as new media center manager

Sarah LaGrece is the new manager of the School of Medicine’s Medical Education Media Center.

Sarah LaGrece has been selected as the new manager of the School of Medicine’s Medical Education Media Center. She will also serve as a senior operations technician at the Clinical Training Facility.

A graduate of UMKC, LaGrece will oversee the media center that serves as the School of Medicine’s instructional resource lab with anatomical models, and audiovisual and computer-based learning materials.

The media center will be open from noon to 5 p.m. during the week. Students can contact LaGrece to make arrangements to use the facility outside of the normally staffed hours. School administration is exploring options to provide additional staffing to expand these daily hours, she said.

In the meantime, LaGrece will be working on taking inventory, updating and repairing the models, and updating the computer software available for students, residents and faculty.

Her morning hours will be spent in the Clinical Training Facility, assisting with administrative duties, simulations with the facility’s mannequins, and helping with the standardized patient program.

A life-long resident of Kansas City, LaGrece graduated from Bishop Miege High School before attending UMKC and earning her bachelor’s degree in communications.

“I was thinking about being a teacher before I went into communications, so education was something I was always interested in,” LaGrece said. “So this seemed to mesh well with my interests.”

Eight School of Medicine students get 2018 awards from Women’s Council Graduate Assistance Fund

Eight School of Medicine students, double the number from last year, will receive awards from the 2018 UMKC Women’s Council Graduate Assistance Fund.

Across UMKC, 67 women received support gifts totaling $78,212.

The School of Medicine winners, their field of study, and their projects:

— Kelly Anderson, anesthesiology, will attend the annual American Academy of Anesthesiologist Assistants conference in St. Petersburg, Florida, with help from the Charles W. Nielsen Award in honor of Georgia Pierson Nielsen.

— Priyesha Bijlani, medicine, will present at the American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition, with help from the Presidents and Past Presidents General Assembly of Greater Kansas City Award II.

— Taylor Carter, medicine, received funding for her Step 2 Clinical Knowledge and Clinical Skills medical licensing exams through the Soroptimist International of Kansas City Award and the Clarence and Shirley Kelley Award.

— Frances Grimstad, bioinformatics, received support to compensate transgender patients participating in radiology imaging as a part of her master’s thesis project, through the Curtis J. Crespino Award and Dorothy A. Stubbs Charitable Trust Award.

— Anna Grodzinsky, cardiology, received support to attend the Cardiac Problems in Pregnancy Conference from the Mary Kay McPhee and Bill Pfeiffer Award.

— Jessica Kieu, obstetrics and gynecology, received support to present research at the 16th World Association for Infant Mental Health World Congress through the Women’s Council Annual Fund Donors Award and Planned Parenthood of Kansas City Award.

— Grace Rector, medicine, received support for an out-of-country elective to provide care to the African pediatric population, through the Zonta Club of Kansas City, Missouri, II Award and the Harriette Yeckel Friendship Across Borders Award.

— Nyaluma Wagala, medicine, received support for her Orthopedic Research and Abstract Presentation through the Marilyn McGuyre and Frances Nelson Office of Student Affairs Award.

Compassionate care will get an extra boost during Patient Solidarity Week

Really listening to patients and providing empathetic, compassionate care have always been a big part of the UMKC School of Medicine’s physician education. Next week those elements will get an extra boost from National Patient Solidarity Week.

The week, Feb. 12-16 this year, is sponsored by the Arnold P. Gold Foundation, a nonprofit organization that promotes patient-centered care. UMKC has had a chapter for 15 years and last month inducted more than three-dozen new members.

National Patient Solidarity Week activities are designed to strengthen the bond between patients and their physicians, nurses and other care givers. By increasing such engagement with patients, the program aims to enhance patient and staff satisfaction and improve health care outcomes.

For several years, members of the school’s Gold Humanism Honor Society chapter also have delivered roses and Valentines to Truman Medical Center patients on or near Valentine’s Day. And for the past three years, a “Tell Me More” activity during the week has emphasized medical students’ conversations that engage patients on important non-medical aspects of their lives.

Answers to some of the questions (such as “How would your friends describe you?”) are written on posters and hung at the head of each patient’s bed, so that everyone on the health care team has the opportunity to relate to patients in ways other than their clinical diagnoses. 

Members of the School of Medicine chapter of the Gold Humanism Honor Society and their faculty sponsor, Carol Stanford, M.D., delivered roses and Valentine's cards to patients at Truman Medical Center.
For several years, members of the School of Medicine chapter of the Gold Humanism Honor Society and their faculty sponsor, Carol Stanford, M.D., have delivered roses and Valentine’s cards to patients at Truman Medical Center.

 

 

 

UMKC Health Sciences District to serve as presenting sponsor for 2018 Hospital Hill Run

The School of Medicine has served as sponsor of the annual Hospital Hill Run 5K race. It is  part of the new UMKC Health Sciences District that has agreed to be the presenting sponsor for the full 2018 Hospital Hill Run event.

The UMKC Health Sciences District has agreed to serve as presenting sponsor for the 2018 Hospital Hill Run scheduled for June 1 and 2 in downtown Kansas City.

Hospital Hill Run has a long history with many of the health care providers and facilities that comprise the UMKC Health Sciences District. Partnership in the city’s oldest running event is a natural extension of those existing relationships.

“The UMKC Health Sciences District includes a dozen health institutions along the Hospital Hill Run race routes,” said Margaret Gibson, the event’s Medical Director. Gibson, a UMKC School of Medicine assistant professor of community and family medicine, is affiliated with Children’s Mercy and Truman Medical Centers, and serves as team physician for UMKC Athletics. “Both district partners and the run also share a long history of promoting health and wellness in our community, so it’s a strong, natural partnership.”

Thinking of taking on the Hospital Hill race?
This sponsor could help you prepare

Formed in 2017, the UMKC Health Sciences District is a partnership of 12 neighboring health care institutions on Hospital Hill: the University of Missouri-Kansas City and its School of Medicine, School of Nursing and Health Studies, School of Pharmacy and School of Dentistry; Truman Medical Centers; Children’s Mercy; Kansas City (Mo.) Health Department; Missouri Department of Mental Health Center for Behavioral Medicine; Jackson County Medical Examiner; Diastole Scholars’ Center; and Ronald McDonald House Charities of Kansas City. The district collaborates on research, grants, community outreach and shared wellness for employees, faculty, students and surrounding neighborhoods.

Now in its 45th year, Hospital Hill Run has been host to world-class runners, Olympians and more than 170,000 athletes of all levels from across the globe. This new partnership ensures that Hospital Hill Run will continue to enhance its legacy as one of the premier endurance events in the United States.

“The Hospital Hill Run was founded by Dr. E. Grey Dimond, founder of the UMKC School of Medicine, to promote health and fitness in Kansas City,” said Beth Salinger, race director. “This exciting partnership with the UMKC Health Sciences District will continue his vision of bringing health and wellness to the Kansas City Region.”

The Hospital Hill Run began in 1974 with 99 athletes paying a $1 registration fee to run a 6.8-mile course at Crown Center. Today, it has evolved into a weekend event that hosts thousands of athletes over two days and three different event distances.

The event now includes three distances: a Friday night 5K fun run, followed by a 7.7-mile and a half marathon on Saturday morning. Those who wish to challenge themselves further can compete in both the 5K on Friday night and either the 7.7-mile or half marathon on Saturday, called the Hospital Hill Run Re-RUN. All events begin and end on Grand Boulevard directly in front of Crown Center.

A two-day health and fitness expo at the Crown Center Exhibit Hall, a Pasta Party, and two post-race parties open to all will round-out race weekend.  In 2017 The Hospital Hill Run Foundation made a $25,000 donation to the Kansas City Police Action League, the 2018 donation will be announced soon.

Introducing UMKC’s new chancellor, C. Mauli Agrawal

UMKC chancellor designate C. Mauli Agrawal

University of Missouri System President Mun Choi announced that C. Mauli Agrawal, interim provost and vice president for academic affairs at the University of Texas at San Antonio, has been appointed chancellor of the University of Missouri-Kansas City, effective June 20.

“I’m thrilled that Dr. Agrawal has agreed to serve as the next chancellor of UMKC, and I’m confident that the university will reach new heights of success in research, education and outreach through his leadership,” Choi said. “UMKC has an outstanding team of administrators, faculty, staff and alumni supporters who will work closely with him to achieve our collective vision.”

David Steelman, chair of the University of Missouri Board of Curators, said, “We had a very strong finalist pool, but what made Dr. Agrawal stand out was his combination of strong academic credentials with proven entrepreneurial skills. He understands the mission of UMKC, but he also knows that mission can only be fulfilled through innovative approaches and risk; he is not a status quo leader.”

Choi will introduce Agrawal to the Kansas City campus at 10 a.m. Friday in Spencer Theatre in the Olson Performing Arts Center. The event will be streamed live at www.umsystem.edu.

“I’m very grateful for the work of the search committee members who spent countless hours reviewing and interviewing candidates,” Choi said. “I’m also extremely appreciative of Dr. Barbara Bichelmeyer, who has made important contributions as interim chancellor and provost at UMKC. Dr. Bichelmeyer will continue in her role as interim chancellor during the transition period and will return to her provost role when Dr. Agrawal arrives in June 2018.”

Bichelmeyer is leading a number of key initiatives that will continue to move forward at UMKC, including academic reorganization, academic portfolio review, strategic plan development and the budgeting process.  She has the full backing and support of Choi to implement changes to achieve UMKC’s goals of excellence in student success, research breakthroughs and effective engagement.

“I will work closely with Dr. Bichelmeyer to make the important and necessary changes during the transition period,” Choi said. “We are indebted to her for her work in continuing to move UMKC forward. She will be a great asset to Dr. Agrawal as he moves into this position.”

Bichelmeyer said she looks forward to working with the new chancellor.

“I’m excited to partner with Chancellor-designate Agrawal and look forward to his arrival in Kansas City,” she said. “His background and experiences complement the mission and vision of UMKC – and together, with all the great partners on this campus and in this metro area, we will keep the momentum going as we grow UMKC into the great university this region needs.”

Before his appointment at UTSA, Agrawal served as vice president for research and dean of the College of Engineering. He also has been a professor of orthopedics and bioengineering at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio, one of the largest medical schools in the United States. He obtained a doctorate from Duke University in 1989, a master’s degree from Clemson University in 1985 and a bachelor’s degree of technology from IIT-Kanpur, India.

“I’m very excited to be chosen to help lead this great university. The potential for the University of Missouri-Kansas City is immense and exciting,” Agrawal said. “UMKC has all the elements necessary to make a great university. With strengths in medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, business, engineering, arts and theater, the university is an exceptional anchor for economic development in the Kansas City region. I’m looking forward to working with UMKC’s faculty and staff as well as Kansas City’s civic leaders who are passionate about higher education and are constantly working to make Kansas City a great place to live, learn and work.”

During his tenure as dean, Agrawal led the UTSA College of Engineering to a 40 percent increase in student enrollment, a 50 percent increase in faculty, and a 400 percent increase in research funding. In 2010, he worked closely with the city of San Antonio and Mayor Julian Castro to establish the Texas Sustainable Energy Research Institute at UTSA, which received a $50 million pledge of support from CPS Energy, the city-owned utility operation.

“Mauli is a beloved member of the San Antonio community who has earned admiration and respect from the university community, the business community and civic leadership,” current San Antonio Mayor Ron Nirenberg said. “I certainly wish him the very best at UMKC. You have an absolute gem of a man to lead the university forward. He understands the important role that a university plays in the civic life of a city and has a unique skill set of translating that role into meeting the needs of the university. His skill set is one of a kind.”

Agrawal has served on the editorial boards of various scientific journals, including the Journal of Biomedical Materials Research, Tissue Engineering, the Journal of System of Systems, and the Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine.

Agrawal’s research specializes in the area of orthopedic and cardiovascular biomaterials/implants, and he has written more than 300 scientific publications and holds 29 patents. He is a Fellow of Biomaterials Science and Engineering, the National Academy of Inventors, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering.  Additionally, he served as president of the Society for Biomaterials in 2006. His bioengineering research group has been responsible for starting three companies in San Antonio.

 

School of Medicine welcomes 2018 Gold Humanism Honor Society members

The 2018 Gold Humanism Society inductees.

The School of Medicine’s Gold Humanism Honor Society welcomed the 2018 class of inductees during its annual induction ceremony on Jan. 20 at Diastole.

It is the 15th consecutive year that the UMKC chapter has recognized students with induction into the national organization. More than three-dozen new members were chosen — 17 students and 20 who are residents, fellows or faculty members.

The students were selected from nominations made by colleagues and faculty based on their excellence in clinical care, leadership, compassion and dedication to service. Members are selected for their exemplary care of patients and their humanistic approach to clinical practice. Dr. R. Stephen Griffith, M.D., and Dr. Glenn E. Talboy Jr., M.D., were this year’s faculty inductees.

With funding support from the Gold Foundation, the School of Medicine established its chapter of the honor society in 2004. A Graduate Medical Education chapter was added in 2014 specifically for School of Medicine/Truman Medical Center residents.

Established in 2002 by the Arnold P. Gold Foundation, the Gold Humanism Honor Society today has 30,000 members nationally in training or practice. It recognizes 149 undergraduate medical education and 14 graduate medical education chapters at medical schools throughout the country.

Members are viewed by their peers as role models for humanistic care within their communities. The society also provides educational events, supports research, promotes professional growth and creates networking opportunities.

2018 Gold Humanism Honor Society

STUDENTS

Avosuashi Akande
Muhammed Alikhan
Saba Bajwa
Deven Bhatia
Matthew Decker
Ahmed Elbermawy
Luke He
Cindy Jiang
Christian Lamb
Raksha Madhavan
Dominic Nardi
Imran Nizamuddin
Uzoamaka Ofodu
Ajay Patel
Ami Purohit
Kale Turner
Vivek Vallurupalli

FACULTY

Dr. R. Stephen Griffith, M.D.
Dr. Glenn E. Talboy, Jr., M.D.

FELLOWS

Amine Bourbia
Stephen Eikerman
Mir Fahad Faisal
Charles McMahon

RESIDENTS

Hussein Asad
Laith Derbas
Jeremy Jennings
Jonathan Kendall
Olivia Kwan
Barbara Nguyen
Anas Noman
Thomas Odeny
Madhuri Ramakrishnan
Shubha Deep Roy
Anweshan Samanta
Justin Stowell
Merrill Thomas
Kaitlin Wittler

He Wrote the Book on That

Waldman’s wealth of textbooks fills needs in practice, education

“HE WROTE THE BOOK ON THAT” usually is a figure of speech. But when it comes to diagnosing, treating and managing pain, Steve Waldman, M.D. ’77, did write the book — dozens, in fact.

His “Interventional Pain Management,” published in 1996, was the first textbook on the new subspecialty of interventional pain management, said Waldman, the School of Medicine’s associate dean of international programs and chair of the Department of Medical Humanities & Bioethics. Other groundbreaking works followed.

Waldman coined the term interventional pain management, for treating pain as the primary focus instead of as a symptom, like fever.

“That was a big shift in pain management,” said Waldman, a clinical professor of anesthesiology at the School of Medicine since 1992. “There were great advances in medical knowledge in the field but the literature really lagged. There was a need and I wrote the book.”

Steven Waldman and book collection.

Steven Waldman, M.D. ’77, has published 29 medical textbooks, in addition to hundreds of peer-reviewed articles and book chapters.

For more than 20 years, Waldman has kept seeing such needs and writing books to meet them, on pain management and on his other area of expertise, diagnostic ultrasound. His published writings have grown to 29 leading medical textbooks, chapters in dozens of others, and more than 240 articles, reviews and other contributions to peer-reviewed journals.

Several of his books have gone into multiple editions, a sign that they are filling vital medical needs and that Waldman is committed to keeping them up to date. Besides topping medical-text sales charts, the books have won awards such as the 2016 British Medical Association Book Award for the third edition of “Physical Diagnosis of Pain: An Atlas of Signs and Symptoms.”

How does an author become so prolific, while also teaching and fulfilling two key administrative posts at the School of Medicine? His longtime editor at W.B. Saunders Co., Michael Houston, said Waldman combined practical knowledge with a keen focus on thoroughness and maximum efficiency.

“Dr. Waldman is one of our most productive and dependable authors,” Houston said. “He is very much aware of what the practicing pain management physician needs to know day to day.”

One physician who values Waldman’s deep knowledge and ability to explain and display medical concepts is Commander Ian M. Fowler, M.D., the head of pain medicine and anesthesiology for the U.S. Navy.

“The anatomic illustrations, radiographic and ultrasound images and detailed explanations in Dr. Waldman’s procedural and comprehensive pain management textbooks have improved my care of patients and improved the learning of my trainees,” Fowler said. “He has kept these informative textbooks up to date with frequent new editions and text on emerging technologies such as ultrasound guided procedures.”

On many of his books, Waldman’s productivity has been enhanced with the help of his three sons and daughter. They’ve done everything from acting as a sounding board for ideas and models for photo illustrations to co-writing, editing and proofreading.

Waldman’s efforts are far from finished. His latest project is a textbook on the use of technology in medical education, which he is writing with a professor at Trakya University in Turkey. Several faculty at UMKC also are contributing.

How much Waldman’s texts have helped medical education and practice is impossible to measure. But his books have been translated into a dozen languages, so their reach is global.

“When I was in China last year representing UMKC at the Edgar Snow Symposium, we toured the hospital at Peking University,” Waldman said. “It was gratifying to see a copy of one of my books, in Chinese, being used in a procedure there.”

School of Medicine appoints new William T. and Marjorie Sirridge Professor in Medical Humanities

Brian Carter, M.D.

The UMKC School of Medicine has announced that Brian Carter, M.D., will serve as the next William T. and Marjorie Sirridge Professor in Medical Humanities.

Carter joined the School of Medicine and Children’s Mercy Hospital in 2012 as a Professor of Pediatrics and Bioethics. He serves as co-director of the Children’s Mercy Bioethics Center’s Pediatric Bioethics Certificate Course and practices at Children’s Mercy Hospital as a neonatologist.

An internationally-recognized expert in medical bioethics and neonatal palliative care, Dr. Carter is the recipient of numerous NIH grants. He has published extensively in the areas of neonatology, neonatal intensive care, palliative care, and bioethics. Carter is the author of three textbooks on neonatal intensive and palliative care.

Carter is a graduate of the University of Tennessee College of Medicine and is a member of the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society. He completed his postgraduate training at Fitzsimons Army Medical Center and the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center.

He is board certified in pediatrics and neonatal-perinatal medicine. Carter served as an active duty U.S. Army Medical Corps officer from 1983 though 1996 and is a decorated Gulf War veteran.

The William T. and Marjorie Sirridge Professorship in Medical Humanities was endowed in 2008 though the generosity of Drs. William and Marjorie Sirridge, two of the UMKC School of Medicine’s Founding Docents.

SOM announces new Associate Dean for Diversity and Inclusion

Nate Thomas

School of Medicine Dean Steven Kanter, M.D., is pleased to announce that E. Nathan Thomas, previously the chief diversity officer for the University of Kansas, has joined the School of Medicine as the new Associate Dean for Diversity and Inclusion.

A highly successful educator, administrator and entrepreneur, Thomas served as vice provost for diversity and equity at Kansas since July 2014. Before that, he was the first campus diversity director at the University of South Florida Polytechnic, and was founder and a consultant with Invictus Human Capital Management in Florida.

At Kansas, Thomas provided leadership in diversity, equity and inclusion for 21 non-academic and academic units. He expanded the program from a campus-wide to a system-wide model that encompasses four of the university’s campuses, including the medical school. He was responsible for implementing a Diversity Leadership Council work group to execute system-wide diversity efforts and developed work groups to coordinate diversity education and training for all new faculty, staff, and students.

His office at Kansas also partnered with the Office of Faculty Development to fund and implement the National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity (NCFDD), Resources for Inclusive Teaching, and the Diversity Scholars Program

While at South Florida for nine years, Thomas developed the first campus diversity office. His efforts included a mentoring program to enhance the retention of a diverse student body, a diversity advisory group of faculty, staff, students and community members, and a successful multi-university grant proposal designed to increase the number of women and minorities in technology disciplines.

Thomas received his bachelor’s degree in psychology and a master’s in community/clinical psychology from Norfolk State University. He completed his Ph.D. in ecological-community psychology at Michigan State University.

Thomas began his new role at the UMKC School of Medicine on December 18.

“We are excited to have someone with Nate’s broad range of experience and talent to lead our efforts in diversity and inclusion,” Kanter said. “Please join me in welcoming him to the UMKC School of Medicine.”