Chelladurai presenting AAMC program on professional development for student affairs

Cary Chelladurai, manager of student affairs at the School of Medicine, is working with the AAMC to present its professional Development Initiative to medical school student affairs leaders across the country.

More than 20 new medical schools have opened in the United States in the last 10 years, including a dozen in the past five years alone. And more are on the way.

As manager of the UMKC School of Medicine Office of Student Affairs, Cary Chelladurai understands some of the unique challenges student affairs leaders will face in establishing and maintaining their own departments.

Chelladurai has been working with the Association of American Medical Colleges since earlier this year, sharing its Professional Development Initiative program with other medical school student affairs associate deans, department managers and supervisors.

The AAMC is made of up of all 151 accredited medical schools in the United States and 17 in Canada. In 2016, the national organization’s Group on Student Affairs crafted the Professional Development Initiative to support its members’ student affairs offices.

After attending the AAMC’s first professional development workshop at a national meeting in 2016 and participating in subsequent webinars, Chelladurai implemented the program’s tools at the UMKC School of Medicine.

“We used them with restructuring our office,” said Chelladurai, who has served in her current position since 2012. “We’ve used them with rewriting job descriptions and, being short-staffed, deciding what duties are most important. It’s a framework and a tool that helps us figure that out so we don’t have to do it from scratch.”

Last February, the AAMC asked Chelladurai and a colleague at the University of Alabama to serve as subject matter experts on the program and present it to others at medical schools across the country. The two teamed up to present the material to about 30 student affairs leaders at the AAMC’s national conference in April.

They began offering a series of three online virtual classroom video conferences earlier this summer. The series provides interactive and collaborative discussions and personalized case studies that explore challenges that student affairs departments have faced. The first online video conference took place in July with following sessions slated for September and October.

The entire program highlights eight specific areas of focus for student affairs offices. It also provides a support network for making programs relative in a changing environment and to help student affairs professionals realize their own potential and career fulfillment.

“We’re talking to our colleagues across the country, telling them how we have personally used this program and giving them ideas about how they can use it at their own medical schools,” Chelladurai said. “It’s helpful to the new medical schools that haven’t developed their student affairs departments yet but they’re in their planning stages. They can use it to make sure they have someone covering all the areas of focus.”

It’s also beneficial to more established student affairs offices that are working to find new and better ways to serve their student populations.

“This information and the tools are free and they’re online, so even if a school can’t afford to send someone to a conference, they can benefit from these tools,” Chelladurai said. “That’s one of the good things about the virtual classroom series. They don’t have to travel. We’re teaching this to 25 of our colleagues across the country. They just need to tune in for a couple of hours three times and they’re getting the professional development instead of spending the money and time travelling to a conference.”

UMKC Health Sciences District names project manager

The UMKC Health Sciences District has announced the appointment of Alison Troutwine as project manager for the District. She will be working out of Truman Medical Centers.

Alison Troutwine

In this newly created role, Troutwine will work with District partners to define strategic objectives and complete action plans in line with those objectives. She previously served as executive administrator at UMKC School of Medicine and has worked on UMKC Health Sciences District initiatives since May 2017. She brings a background and familiarity with the District partners to her new position, where she will continue to help move the District forward strategically.

Prior to joining UMKC in 2014, Troutwine worked in the Department of Surgery at the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine. She will complete her master’s degree in Nonprofit Management at the UMKC Henry W. Bloch School of Management in December 2018.

“This is a great opportunity to help tell our story and take the UMKC Health Sciences District to the next level,” said Troutwine. “I look forward to building on the District’s momentum and seeing its future success.”

The UMKC Health Sciences District combines the unique expertise and services of 12 neighboring institutions to spur health-related research and community outreach in service of the Kansas City region and beyond. Partners include UMKC and its schools of dentistry, medicine, nursing and health studies, and pharmacy; Truman Medical Centers; Children’s Mercy; Kansas City, Missouri Health Department; Missouri Department of Mental Health Center for Behavioral Medicine; Jackson County Medical Examiner; Ronald McDonald House Charities of Kansas City; and Diastole Scholars’ Center.

White Coat Ceremony marks stepped-up clinical education for 110 UMKC School of Medicine students

Third-year medical students at the UMKC School of Medicine entering the more intensive clinical phase of their medical school training marked that passage Aug. 5th with their White Coat Ceremony.

The ceremony united 110 students who spent the majority of their first two years studying on the Volker Campus with their new docent units at Hospital Hill and Saint Luke’s Hospital. The 2018 White Coat Ceremony was held at White Recital Hall with Jill Moormeier, M.D., chair of internal medicine at Truman Medical Center Hospital Hill, presiding.

See more photos from the 2018 White Coat Ceremony

The third-year students also heard from Mary Anne Jackson, M.D. ’78, the school’s interim dean. And they saw Jared Keeler, M.D. ’94, win this year’s award for the outstanding year 1 and 2 docent.

Sponsored by the Arnold P. Gold Foundation, the White Coat Ceremony emphasizes the importance of compassionate care for patients and proficiency in both the art and the science of medicine. It has been a tradition at the UMKC School of Medicine since 2003.

Then came the highlight of the event: students learning new docent team assignments and being cloaked in their new white coats. Raymond Cattaneo, M.D. ’03, assistant dean for years 1 and 2, presented the white coats.

 

Summer Scholars puts area students on track for careers in health care

Students from Kansas City area high schools took part in the 38th year of the UMKC School of Medicine Summer Scholars Program in July.

Sade-joy Dugbo had an idea that a career in health care might be part of her future. After spending the last week of July in the UMKC School of Medicine’s Advance Summer Scholars program, she’s convinced.

As she prepared for her senior year at Kansas City’s Notre Dame de Sion High School, Dugbo joined a group of nearly 85 area high school juniors and seniors taking part in a one- or two-week experience in the health care profession.

“Actually, seeing what it’s like to be a medical student, seeing first-hand what they do, what the doctors do, has really changed my view of what the medical field is like,” Dugbo said.

Didactic classroom sessions are part of the two-week Summer Scholars experience.

For 38 years, the Summer Scholars program has provided minority and disadvantaged students in the Kansas City metropolitan area the opportunity to find out first-hand what a career in health care looks like. The program also prepares them to be successful as they move from high school to college.

Students take part in a two-week session of Summer Scholars each July during which they receive daily instruction in academic areas such as chemistry and language arts, and study anatomy and physiology in the school’s cadaver lab. Classroom experiences range from medical terminology and understanding health disparities to ACT and standardized test taking.

Those who complete the two-week session can return the following summer to take part in the Advanced Summer Scholars, which provides additional experiences in different medical services such as emergency and outpatient medicine, rehabilitation, and nursing. This year’s advanced group was treated to additional hospital experiences including viewing surgeries in the operating room and shadowing students and physicians at Children’s Mercy Kansas City.

The experience for advanced scholars was broken into two one-week sessions this year in order to allow more students to take part. Dugbo was part of the first session of Advanced Summer Scholars.

“The ability to shadow the doctors and see the students in the hospitals was huge because I got to see how they interact with patients and what their daily lives were like,” she said.

The hospital experiences opened the eyes of Emily Reed, a senior at Winnetonka High School who was also part of the Advanced Summer Scholars.

“Last year it was more time learning chemistry and biology,” she said. “This year, there’s a lot more time in the hospital where last year it was mainly shadowing medical students in the clinic. The good thing about this program is that it showed me a variety of areas of medicine. I thought I was dead set on going into one area of medicine because I’ve always been interested in surgery. But now, it’s going to be a matter of seeing how many choices I have and what decision I’m going to make in the future.”

Dugbo said that it’s still too early to say what field of medicine she’d like to enter or where she will go to school in the future, but her experiences these past two summers has made her sure of one thing. Her plan is to start looking into pre-medical school programs soon, and that includes applying to the UMKC School of Medicine.

“We learned this is what you’ll be doing in medical school, this is what you’ll be doing after medical school. It’s really solidified what I want to do in the future,” Dugbo said. “Now, it’s 100 percent, I want do something in the medical field because I’ve loved this experience.”

Kansas City Marathon offers UMKC School of Medicine discount

The UMKC School of Medicine is serving as a Gold Sponsor of the 2018 Kansas City Marathon, and race organizers are excited to offer a 15 percent discount on race registration fees to all  faculty, staff, students and residents. This year’s event will take place on Oct. 20 with four race distances to chose from — 5K, 10K, half marathon or full marathon.

The discount code can be used for any of the KC Marathon’s race distances. The event is open to walkers as well as runners.

To get the discount, simply copy and paste or enter 15OFF2018KCM in the “Got a discount code?” box near the end of the online registration process at www.kcmarathon.org. Please note that this discount code is case sensitive. It must be entered exactly as it appears.

Why should you participate in the Kansas City Marathon on October 20?

  • This is Kansas City’s largest and most exciting race. It gives runners a tour of the city’s most beautiful landmarks and interesting neighborhoods, including the World War I Memorial, the Country Club Plaza, the Nelson Atkins Museum of Art, Waldo, Westport, 18th & Vine and more.
  • The race has distance options for all fitness levels with a 5K, 10K, half marathon and full marathon.
  • There are fireworks to kick off the race and a huge after party with live music, free food and free beer!
  • All runners will receive a participant shirt, a large finisher’s medal, free downloadable race photos and more.
  • After you conquer the Kansas City hills, you’ll be rewarded with a lightning-fast downhill finish that includes a breathtaking view of the Kansas City skyline!
  • Still not sure? Click here to check out their 2017 recap video to learn what the Kansas City Marathon is all about.

Children’s Mercy selects new president, CEO

Paul Kempinski

Children’s Mercy Kansas City, a primary teaching hospital of the UMKC School of Medicine, announced Paul Kempinski, MS, FACHE, as its next President and Chief Executive Officer, effective November 1.

Kempinski serves as President of Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children (N/AIDHC) in Wilmington, Delaware. Additionally, he serves as Enterprise Vice President for the Nemours Children’s Health System.

At Nemours, he is responsible for the daily operations of the 200-bed institution, a Magnet-designated hospital that is recognized among the top children’s hospitals in the nation by U.S. News & World Report. He previously served as Operational Vice President for Nemours Children’s Health System and Chief Operating Officer of N/AIDHC. Kempinski’s many accomplishments at Nemours include a 450,000-square-foot hospital expansion in 2014.

Kempinski will replace Randall L. O’Donnell, PhD., who has served as President and CEO of Children’s Mercy since 1993.

Saint Luke’s Health System CEO chosen as 2020 chair of American Hospital Association

    Saint Luke’s Hospital of Kansas City
Melinda Estes, M.D.

Melinda Estes, M.D., president and CEO of Saint Luke’s Health System in Kansas City, has been selected chair-elect designate of the American Hospital Association by the association’s Board of Directors.

As the 2020 chair, she will become the top-elected official of the national organization that represents America’s hospitals and health systems, while working to advance health in America.

Saint Luke’s Hospital of Kansas City has a long-standing partnership with the UMKC School of Medicine, serving as one of the school’s primary teaching hospitals.

A board-certified neurologist and neuropathologist, Estes has served as president and CEO of Saint Luke’s Health System since 2011. She oversees the operations of the system, the Kansas City region’s only locally-owned, not-for-profit, faith-based, aligned health system, which includes 16 hospitals and campuses, home care and hospice, adolescent and adult behavioral health facilities, well over 100 physician practices and retail clinics, life care senior living communities, and a college of health sciences.

The AHA is a not-for-profit association of nearly 5,000 hospitals, health care systems and networks, and 43,000 individual members committed to improving health in their communities. Founded in 1898, the association provides education for health care leaders and information on health care issues and trends.

Volunteer work gives sixth-year student great satisfaction and earns him the first Amit J. Patel Extra Mile Scholarship

Amit J. Patel, M.D.’05, congratulates sixth-year medical student Luke He, the first recipient of a scholarship Patel financed to recognize students committed to helping others through volunteering.

Luke He, heading into his sixth year at the UMKC School of Medicine, says he does volunteer work “because I’m motivated by the impact it has made, not for my own recognition.”

But now He has been recognized for that work, and in a big way, as the first recipient of the Amit J. Patel Extra Mile Scholarship.

Patel, a 2005 School of Medicine graduate and docent for the Green 8 unit, started a scholarship aimed at students who volunteer for many reasons: because he knows of the great commitment students make; because “serving others, particularly those in need, is our greatest duty”; and because “it’s important for the students to know that alumni are proud of them and want them to succeed.”

For He, service to others has always been a top value in his family. He has lived that by volunteering with Big Brothers Big Sisters, the Gold Key International Honour Society, Camp Cardiac and Harvesters.

“Before I was born, my parents immigrated here from China seeking better opportunities for their future kids,” said He, whose brother, James He, is also a UMKC School of Medicine student. “My parents are highly educated and had great jobs in China, yet they chose to leave all of their friends and family for their own future family. They’ve made huge sacrifices in their lives so I could have the opportunity to get a great education and a productive career.”

He is co-president of the School of Medicine’s Class of 2019 and previously received a Missouri State Medical Association Scholarship, which has helped him get on his way to a great career. And he said the Extra Mile Scholarship will be a great help, too.

“This is a significant amount of money and has a huge impact on my financial situation,” said He, whose wife, Breanna, is a recent UMKC School of Education graduate just starting to teach second grade. “I have held a part-time job every year in medical school, and I plan to continue working the same amount of hours. But the scholarship means I will be able to take out less in loans this year, though I am anticipating more expenses with residency applications and traveling for interviews.”

He also plans to keep up his volunteer work with Big Brothers Big Sisters.

“It’s an organization in which you are matched with an elementary or high school student who may qualify based on the family’s financial situation, or a variety of other challenges that they may face,” He said. “Together, my ‘little’ and I cook, fish, hike, go to sporting events and much more.”

Rather than a burden, He said, volunteering should be something one enjoys – and he definitely enjoys hanging out with his “little brother.”

“I usually try to assist him in school and recently helped him get a job. We are doing more and more career planning as he gets through high school,” He said. “My biggest goal is to have him explore different career fields and start taking the right steps toward his future.”

He, who is interested in emergency medicine, also said he was inspired by his benefactor and impressed that Patel, in mid-career, “is so passionate about investing in students that he is awarding this huge scholarship.”

For his part, Patel said He was “more than deserving.”

“I truly believe that being a physician is an honorable profession if approached with a selfless attitude,” Patel said. “I wanted to give back to my school, but moreso the students directly because I was a student here not too long ago. I feel really happy to see our students succeed.”

School of Medicine welcomes new docent to Blue 1 unit

Rishi Sharma, M.D.

The School of Medicine welcomed Rishi Sharma, M.D., M.H.S.A., to the faculty as the new docent for the Blue 1 unit on July 1.

In addition to his role as assistant professor of internal medicine at the School of Medicine, he will also serve as a research associate in cardiovascular and renal research at the Kansas City VA Medical Center.

Before joining the School of Medicine, Sharma served two years as a hospitalist at Overland Park Regional Medical Center in Overland Park, Kansas. He has also served as a hospitalist and director of cardiopulmonary services at St. Catherine Hospital in Garden City, Kansas.

Sharma brings a research background, having served as a research assistant at the Midwest Biomedical Research Foundation in Kansas City.

He came to the United States after earning his medical degree from the Guwahati Medical College in India. He received a master’s in health services administration at the Kansas University Medical Center, then completed his internal medicine residency at Nassau University Medical Center in East Meadow, New York. There, he was recognized as Intern of the Year.

In addition, Sharma served as chief resident at Nassau University, and as an instructor for Introduction to Clinical Medicine at the State University of New York-Stony Brook.

The author of many research posters, presentations and journal articles, Sharma is also a member of many health care societies including the American Heart Association, Doctors for America and the American College of Health Care Executives.

School of Medicine tops in Hospital Hill Run participation

From left, Kelly Rasor, WorkPlace Foot Race coordinator; Interim Dean Mary Anne Jackson, M.D. ’78; Jordann Dhuse, medical student and avid runner; Hospital Hill Run Director Beth Salinger; and Director of Advancement Fred Schlichting.

The Hospital Hill Run this year added the WorkPlace Foot Race by Blue KC, designed to increase community fitness and participation in the nationally known race weekend. The contest was open to schools, businesses, non-profits and health care organizations across the area, and the UMKC School of Medicine took first place.

The contest awarded 5 points for each half marathon participant, 4 points for each 7.7-mile race participant and 3 points for each 5K participant and volunteer. The points then were divided by the number of employees for each business or organization, so that participation rate rather than sheer numbers won the day. The School of Medicine had 111 participants.

This also was the first year for the UMKC Health Sciences District to be the presenting sponsor for the race weekend. The race was started by Dr. E. Grey Dimond, the founder of the UMKC School of Medicine. For several years the school sponsored the Friday evening 5K portion of the Hospital Hill Run, and UMKC medical students routinely volunteer to help with the race, including as staff for the medical tent during the races.

Longtime race director Beth Salinger and Kelly Rasor, who is in charge of the WorkPlace Foot Race, presented a traveling trophy on July 19 to the School of Medicine. Interim Dean Mary Anne Jackson, M.D. ’78; Director of Advancement Fred Schlichting; and Jordann Dhuse, a 2017 Hospital Hill Run winner and UMKC medical student active in the Health Science District’s Run/Walk Club, were on hand to accept the trophy.

Besides sponsorship from Blue KC, the WorkPlace Foot Race has support from the Chamber of Commerce of Greater Kansas City and expects participation to grow next year as more organizations use it to promote their fitness and team-building.