Tag Archives: Alumni

He Wrote the Book on That

Waldman’s wealth of textbooks fills needs in practice, education

“HE WROTE THE BOOK ON THAT” usually is a figure of speech. But when it comes to diagnosing, treating and managing pain, Steve Waldman, M.D. ’77, did write the book — dozens, in fact.

His “Interventional Pain Management,” published in 1996, was the first textbook on the new subspecialty of interventional pain management, said Waldman, the School of Medicine’s associate dean of international programs and chair of the Department of Medical Humanities & Bioethics. Other groundbreaking works followed.

Waldman coined the term interventional pain management, for treating pain as the primary focus instead of as a symptom, like fever.

“That was a big shift in pain management,” said Waldman, a clinical professor of anesthesiology at the School of Medicine since 1992. “There were great advances in medical knowledge in the field but the literature really lagged. There was a need and I wrote the book.”

Steven Waldman and book collection.

Steven Waldman, M.D. ’77, has published 29 medical textbooks, in addition to hundreds of peer-reviewed articles and book chapters.

For more than 20 years, Waldman has kept seeing such needs and writing books to meet them, on pain management and on his other area of expertise, diagnostic ultrasound. His published writings have grown to 29 leading medical textbooks, chapters in dozens of others, and more than 240 articles, reviews and other contributions to peer-reviewed journals.

Several of his books have gone into multiple editions, a sign that they are filling vital medical needs and that Waldman is committed to keeping them up to date. Besides topping medical-text sales charts, the books have won awards such as the 2016 British Medical Association Book Award for the third edition of “Physical Diagnosis of Pain: An Atlas of Signs and Symptoms.”

How does an author become so prolific, while also teaching and fulfilling two key administrative posts at the School of Medicine? His longtime editor at W.B. Saunders Co., Michael Houston, said Waldman combined practical knowledge with a keen focus on thoroughness and maximum efficiency.

“Dr. Waldman is one of our most productive and dependable authors,” Houston said. “He is very much aware of what the practicing pain management physician needs to know day to day.”

One physician who values Waldman’s deep knowledge and ability to explain and display medical concepts is Commander Ian M. Fowler, M.D., the head of pain medicine and anesthesiology for the U.S. Navy.

“The anatomic illustrations, radiographic and ultrasound images and detailed explanations in Dr. Waldman’s procedural and comprehensive pain management textbooks have improved my care of patients and improved the learning of my trainees,” Fowler said. “He has kept these informative textbooks up to date with frequent new editions and text on emerging technologies such as ultrasound guided procedures.”

On many of his books, Waldman’s productivity has been enhanced with the help of his three sons and daughter. They’ve done everything from acting as a sounding board for ideas and models for photo illustrations to co-writing, editing and proofreading.

Waldman’s efforts are far from finished. His latest project is a textbook on the use of technology in medical education, which he is writing with a professor at Trakya University in Turkey. Several faculty at UMKC also are contributing.

How much Waldman’s texts have helped medical education and practice is impossible to measure. But his books have been translated into a dozen languages, so their reach is global.

“When I was in China last year representing UMKC at the Edgar Snow Symposium, we toured the hospital at Peking University,” Waldman said. “It was gratifying to see a copy of one of my books, in Chinese, being used in a procedure there.”

SOM announces interim chair of psychiatry

Dr. Stephen Jarvis

The UMKC School of Medicine has announced that Stephen Jarvis, M.D., will serve as interim academic chair of the UMKC Department of Psychiatry.

Jarvis received his medical degree from University of Missouri-Columbia, and completed residency and fellowship training from the Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

As a UMKC faculty member, Jarvis has held multiple administrative positions at Truman Medical Centers and at the former Western Missouri Mental Health Center. He serves as the associate chief medical officer and clinical department chair for Psychiatry at Truman Medical Centers.

Jarvis assumed his new role on November 20, 2017.

He replaces Nash Boutros, M.D., who served as chair of the UMKC Department of Psychiatry and  medical director for the Center for Behavioral Medicine from 2014 to 2017. Boutros, a professor of psychiatry, holds tenure in the department of Biomedical and Health Informatics. Boutros will remain at UMKC to continue his research program.

Celebrating lives saved by TMC lung cancer screening

Dr. Justin Stowell, a radiology resident at Truman Medical Center, talked about the success of an early lung cancer screening program he leads.

The UMKC Health Sciences District marked Lung Cancer Awareness Month on Thursday with “Smokin’ Out Lung Cancer,” a midday event that outlined the district’s early lung cancer screening, treatment and prevention efforts, led by Truman Medical Centers.

TMC’s screening program emphasizes early detection and treatment for longtime smokers and ex-smokers. The event Thursday celebrated its patients’ and doctors’ success in committing to healthy living and saving lives. The screening program uses low-dose CT scans and is the only one in the nation to be driven by resident physicians, who are supervised by faculty from the UMKC School of Medicine.

Among the speakers at the event was Dr. Justin Stowell, the radiology resident who started the screening program and who has compiled statistics on its early success. When lung cancer is detected in its early stage, he said, cure rates of 70 to 80 percent are possible.

And besides catching lung cancer early, Stowell said TMC’s  program has had success in getting more than one-fifth of the people tested to quit smoking.

Lung cancer is responsible for 155,000 U.S. deaths a year, more than breast, prostate and colon cancer combined, which emphasizes the need for awareness events such as “Smokin’ Out Lung Cancer.” Stowell also noted that Medicare covers the early screening for many longtime smokers, and insurance companies have been adding coverage as the success of the screenings has been demonstrated.

The event, which included a barbecue lunch, was attended by some lung cancer survivors who had benefited from the screenings and subsequent treatment or surgery to remove their cancer. A video was shown that told the survival story of Thaddus Owens, who was at the luncheon.

The event also drew some smokers whose doctors had encouraged them to attend. One of them was 64-year-old Carl Kendall, who said he had tapered off in recent years but still smoked at least half a pack a day.

“I started smoking in 1968,” he said. “I have a doctor’s appointment next week, and I’m going to ask about this screening.”

Charlie Shields, TMC president and CEO, kicked off the presentations. Besides highlighting the screening program’s success, he noted that “Smokin’ Out Lung Cancer” was the first event sponsored by the UMKC Health Sciences District—a newly formed, premier academic health district made up of collaborating health care institutions on Hospital Hill.

Representatives of the School of Pharmacy presented information on smoking and lung cancer.

 “Truman Medical Centers is proud to be part of this exciting partnership,” Shields said. “The UMKC Health Sciences District is proving to do what it was intended, and that is to improve the health of the community in a variety of ways.”

The UMKC Health Sciences District is a cooperative partnership formed by 12 neighboring health care institutions on Hospital Hill: University of Missouri- Kansas City and its School of Medicine, School of Nursing and Health Studies, School of Pharmacy and School of Dentistry; Truman Medical Centers; Children’s Mercy; Kansas City, Missouri, Health Department; Missouri Department of Mental Health Center for Behavioral Medicine; Jackson County Medical Examiner; Diastole Scholars’ Center; and Ronald McDonald House Charities of Kansas City. 

 

School of Medicine announces new chair of Biomedical and Health Informatics

Shui Qing Ye, M.D., Ph.D.

School of Medicine Dean Steven Kanter, M.D., has announced the appointment of Shui Qing Ye, M.D., Ph.D. as chair of the Department of Biomedical and Health Informatics. The appointment will take effect January 1, 2018.

A professor of pediatrics at the School of Medicine, Ye will continue to occupy the William R. Brown / Missouri Endowed Chair in Medical Genetics and Molecular Medicine.

As department chair, he will work closely with faculty, staff, and students to help position the Department of Biomedical and Health Informatics as a catalyst of innovation and creativity. Ye is an expert in genomics and translational bioinformatics, which will help foster important collaborations with other units throughout the university and with School of Medicine clinical partners. He has a strong track record of using new-age tools to gather and explore Big Data, and of partnering with researchers locally and worldwide in an effort to pinpoint new diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for human diseases.

Ye is the author of two highly acclaimed books on bioinformatics and Big Data in addition to extensive research experience. He served previously as director of the Gene Expression Profiling Core at the Center of Translational Respiratory Medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Additionally, he served at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine as director of the Molecular Resource Core.

Ye earned his medical degree from Wuhan University School of Medicine at Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China. He completed a postdoctoral fellowship in lipid metabolism at the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation in Oklahoma City, and received his Ph.D. in molecular mechanisms of disease from the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine.

Fifteen selected to join UMKC chapter of AOA honor society

The UMKC School of Medicine’s Missouri Delta chapter of the Alpha Omega Alpha medical honor society recently announced its newest members. The society selected 15 sixth-year students who will be inducted into the society next May.

Students selected for induction are Gaurav Anand, Tiffany Bland, Dorothy Daniel, Michael Keirsey, Brooks Kimmis, Margaret Kirwin, Nidhi Reddy, Shiva Reddy, Alexandra Reinbold, Elina Sagaydak, David Sanborn, Sumita Sharma, Ryan Sieli, Meghna Singh, and Christopher Tomassian.

Selection to the organization is considered an honor recognizing one’s dedication to the profession and art of healing. It is based on character and values such as honesty, honorable conduct, morality, virtue, unselfishness, ethical ideals, dedication to serving others and leadership. Membership also recognizes excellence in academic scholarship.

In May, the School of Medicine AOA chapter also welcomes fifth-year students, alumni, residents and faculty inductees who are announced in the spring. One or two sixth-year students will be selected next spring to join the 2018 class of inductees.

Stanford explores physicians’ role in countering intimate partner violence

Carol Stanford, M.D.’79, associate professor at the UMKC School of Medicine, delivered the annual Marjorie Sirridge Outstanding Women in Medicine Lecture.

Domestic violence deeply touched the life of Carol Stanford, M.D. ’79, when one of her colleagues was murdered many years ago.

At a Sept. 28 lecture at the UMKC School of Medicine, Stanford shared the story of that crime while exploring what physicians can do about the problem of intimate partner violence.

Stanford, delivering the 2017 Marjorie Sirridge Outstanding Women in Medicine Lecture, said such violence causes “tremendous emotional, social and economic dislocations” and crosses all demographic lines.

To illustrate that, Stanford told about reading a newspaper report of a “Johnson County soccer mom” who had been killed, and her businessman husband arrested. She found out a few hours later that the victim was her nurse practitioner.

“This is real and touches each of us,” said Stanford, associate professor at the School of Medicine. Most victims are women in heterosexual relationships, she noted, but men also can be victimized. Abuse also occurs in same-sex relationships and ones involving bisexual or transgender partners.

According to Stanford,  2 million women in the United States suffer intimate partner violence annually. Of those, more than 300,000 are pregnant women. One-third of homicides stem from intimate partner violence, Stanford said.

In their lifetimes, one in four women and one in seven men will experience severe intimate partner violence. By one estimate, the costs of care and economic loss from intimate partner violence are more than $8 billion a year. A victim’s health care needs can be increased for 15 years after such abuse, Stanford said.

She went on to say that it’s important for physicians to be aware and look for a wide range of physical symptoms that can indicate abuse, along with psychological problems, including depression, low self esteem, anxiety and substance abuse.

“I’ve started asking routinely, ‘Have you ever been abused?’ or ‘Do you feel safe in your relationship?’ ”

Prenatal care calls for particular vigilance, she said, given women’s vulnerability during that time. The safety of children in an abusive household also must be considered and physicians must report abuse if there are minor children.

In educating future physicians, Stanford said that it’s important to include clinical experience with victims, and suggested integrating more education about intimate partner violence into the curriculum. Students are becoming more aware of the issue through their community involvement, such as volunteering at such places as the Rose Brooks Center for domestic violence victims.

Stanford also said it was important for physicians to do their part because to raise awareness and battle domestic violence. An abused partner’s situation can be difficult and complicated, so a physician may provide a confidential ear, limited by the need to report child endangerment. The criminal justice system, a victim’s employer and other institutions simply can’t address the problem alone, she said.

Stanford also provided several resources to aid physicians in referring victimized patients for  help.

“I think it’s important that we empower patients, because they are the expert on their own situation.”

As violent as the world is, Stanford says she is optimistic. “I think the key to solving this, ultimately, is gender equity. We need a multi-disciplinary educational approach.”

Stanford is a longtime faculty member and docent, known for her dedication to students and involvement with their activities. She has served as faculty adviser or sponsor for many students groups and programs, including the Gold Humanism Honor Society, the UMKC chapter of the American Medical Women’s Association and Camp Cardiac.

At the lecture she thanked her husband, James Stanford, M.D. ’80, and son, Ian Stanford, both in attendance. She also thanked the several members of the Sirridge family present and praised the late Drs. William and Marjorie Sirridge as giants in the success of the School of Medicine and its “humanistic approach to interacting with patients.”

The Marjorie S. Sirridge, M.D., Outstanding Women in Medicine Lectureship was established in 1997 to recognize her dedication, compassion and advancement of patient care and medical education in Kansas City.

Alumni join SOM faculty as newest docents

Monica Katamura, M.D.

It had been four years since Monica Lau Katamura, M.D., ’13, last stepped inside the UMKC School of Medicine. So when the school’s newest docent returned in August, she wasted little time in heading to the fourth-floor Gold 1 docent unit.

“One of the first things I did was go back to my old office and take a walk down memory lane,” Katamura said. “It was surreal coming back to the place that had trained me.”

Katamura completed her residency in medicine pediatrics at Tulane University in New Orleans last spring. Now, as the School of Medicine’s Blue 8 docent, she has a new office located on the fifth floor.

As a docent, Katamura said she fees a responsibility to take what she learned as a resident, combined with her time as a student at UMKC, to help the next generation of physicians.

“I want to come back and apply some of what I learned to assess the needs among my individual group of students and make a framework of how to best mentor them, guide them and nurture them through their years three through six,” she said.

Katamura served as chief resident during her final year at Tulane, where she gained administrative experience that she hopes to incorporate into her new role as a docent. She was active in numerous volunteer activities throughout her residency, serving both locally and abroad. She collaborated with pediatrics residency staff and co-residents on the clinical learning environment committee to improve clinical and academic learning environments and provided resident leadership as chair of the medicine-pediatrics ambulatory committee.

Ultimately, Katamura said, she returned to the School of Medicine largely because of the docent program and to be a part of the mentorship that docents provide students.

“Somebody told me that alumni are the most enthusiastic docents,” Katamura said. “I am very enthusiastic about coming back.”

She isn’t alone. Two more recent additions to the School of Medicine’s docent teams are alumni.

Richard Harlow, M.D.

Richard Harlow, M.D., ’82, began his role as Green 1 docent this past November.

He was a founder and one of the original owners of HIMS, one of the first and largest hospitalist groups in the Kansas City metro area. After 20 years as a hospitalist, he was ready to return to his roots.

“I have always had medical students with me during my entire time in private practice and have always loved to teach,” Harlow said. “I really feel that the UMKC School of Medicine does a singularly excellent job of preparing students to be doctors on day one and I had always wanted to return one day to give back to what I so enjoyed. I really love working with the students and residents.”

After completing an internal medicine residency at the UMKC School of Medicine and Truman Medical Centers, Harlow entered private practice in Belton, Missouri. He also served as president of the medical staff at Research Belton Hospital and as chairman of the Department of Medicine at St. Joseph Hospital.

David John, M.D.

David John, M.D., ’77, returned to Kansas City last spring and joined the School of Medicine faculty as docent for Katamura’s old student unit, Gold 1. A board-certified rheumatologist for more than 30 years, John previously practiced at Queen’s Medical Center and at  Spark Matsunaga V.A. Medical Center in Honolulu.

He said when the growing demands of electronic medical records began encroaching on his teaching time, he decided to step down from his hospital work and eventually decided to leave his private practice.

“Leaving was the hardest decision I believe I’ve ever made,” John said.

In January, John stepped down as Chair of  Pu’ulu Lapa’au, the Hawaii’s Physican’s Health Committee, to return to UMKC.

“It’s been a very good decision,” he said.

While in Hawaii, John served as chair of the Life Foundation, an organization that continues the fight against HIV/AIDS, and participated as a board member of Friends of Youth Outreach, attacking the problem of child homelessness.

He completed his internal medicine residency at the University of Hawaii School of Medicine and his rheumatology fellowship at the University of Michigan. He joined the teaching faculty at the University of Hawaii in the department of medicine in 1984. There, he served on many committees and received the school’s Excellence in Teaching Award.

 

 

Dr. Gardner appointed Assistant Dean for Graduate Medical Education

Dr. Sara Gardner

School of Medicine Dean Steven Kanter, M.D., announced that Sara Gardner, M.D., associate professor and director of the Internal Medicine-Pediatrics residency program, has been appointed assistant dean for Graduate Medical Education.

Dr. Gardner will work directly with the associate dean for Graduate Medical Education in interacting with the school’s Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and non-ACGME programs, residents and fellows. She will be responsible for quality improvement of graduate programs and providing faculty development opportunities to enhance the educational experience for residents and fellows.

She brings important qualifications to this new role, with leadership experience in Graduate Medical Education, teaching and mentoring. Dr. Gardner has experience in the ACGME review process, having served as residency program director since 2009, and as associate program director in 2007 and 2008. She also serves as a member of the Graduate Medical Education Committee.

She has chaired the School of Medicine’s Council on Evaluation, served as a Years’ 1 and 2 Docent, and has been a member of many School of Medicine, Internal Medicine, and Pediatrics residency committees.

A 2002 graduate of the UMKC School of Medicine, Dr. Gardner completed her residency and served as chief resident in internal medicine and pediatrics at UMKC.

Please join Dean Kanter in congratulating Dr. Gardner and welcoming her to this important new role at the School of Medicine.

Hospital CMO Divya Shroff honored with 2017 Take Wing Award

Divya Shroff, M.D., ’00, F.H.M., with School of Medicine Dean Steven Kanter, M.D., received the 2017 E. Grey Dimond, M.D., Take Wing Award on Monday, May 22.

When word reached Divya Shroff, M.D., ’00, F.H.M., that she had been selected as winner of the 2017 UMKC School of Medicine E. Grey Dimond, M.D., Take Wing Award, tears filled her eyes.

“I’m not worthy,” Shroff said. “That was my first response.”

Her colleagues would beg to differ.

Having worked at two of the largest health care systems in the United States, Shroff has grown into a nationally recognized leader in bringing together medicine and technology to improve the quality of patient care.

Today, she is also responsible for the strategic leadership and oversight of a staff of nearly 1,800 physicians and advanced practitioners as chief medical officer of TriStar Centennial Medical Center, in Nashville, Tennessee. With that comes the duty of maintaining the highest standard of quality and clinical excellence for the flagship hospital of the nation’s largest for-profit health care corporation, Hospital Corporation of American (HCA).

It’s a goal that Shroff and her team have consistently met since she took on the physician leadership role in 2013. For the past five years, the hospital has earned an A+ rating for quality and safety from the Leapfrog Group, a national nonprofit organization that reports on hospital performance.

“It’s a very busy clinical facility and we want to make sure we’re meeting the quality standards,” Shroff said.

Shroff received this year’s Take Wing Award at the annual Take Wing Lectureship on Monday, May 22, at the School of Medicine.

Before her appointment at TriStar Centennial, Shroff joined HCA’s clinical services group as chief clinical transformation officer and vice president. The role made her responsible for implementing electronic health records systems throughout the corporation’s more than 170 hospitals. Only a small fraction of those were using electronic health records when she arrived. Within a few years, all HCA hospitals across 20 states were on board.

Shroff began building a resume as a physician leader and medical technology innovator at the Veterans Administration in Washington, D.C. She said she honed her skills by knowing and working closely with the folks in the IT department. Developing those relationships were important, as she played a vital role in projects such as using a Blackberry — before the days of the iPhone — to transmit EKGs to off-site cardiologists, developing an electronic providers hand-off tool, and implementing an interactive bedside TV for patients that communicates with the hospital’s electronic medical records system.

She said her time at the UMKC School of Medicine helped her build the skills necessary to be successful.

“I think it’s because of the core competencies the school teaches,” said Shroff. “We were put in the hospital environment at such a formative point in our careers. It allowed us to look at things innovatively. As a student, you are empowered in a way that many medical schools don’t allow.”

She said the experience teaches young physicians to take ownership of becoming outstanding patient care providers.

“What has allowed me to be successful in my role today is the foundation that I got from the UMKC School of Medicine,” Shroff said.

Now, part of Shroff’s task is to share that charge of maintaining the highest quality of patient care with the medical staff of a large, full-service community hospital that’s about to embark on a $120-million expansion. Leaders at TriStar Centennial are also exploring the idea of adding a graduate medical education program.

“We want to be the hospital of choice for Nashville,” Shroff said. “I’m honored to be part of that vision.”