Tag Archives: Awards and Recognition

School of Medicine seeks nominations for annual awards

The School of Medicine is accepting nominations for three upcoming faculty, staff and student awards in the areas of diversity and health equity, mentoring and medical education research.

The Excellence in Diversity and Health Equity in Medicine Awards recognizes an individual or organization that has demonstrated sustained and impactful contribution to diversity, inclusion and cultural competency or health equity. The award is given to a student or student organization, and to faculty, staff, resident and/or organization/department.

Nominees should be those who have made consistent contributions to diversity, inclusion, cultural competency or health equity through one or more of the following:

  • Recruiting and/or retaining a diverse student or faculty body;
  • Facilitating an inclusive environment for success of all;
  • Working to promote health equity and the elimination of health disparities;
  • Strengthening efforts to develop or implement cultural competency strategies that improve health-care delivery.

Nomination materials should be sent to the attention of Cynthia Ginn in the Office of Diversity and Inclusion at ginnc@umkc.edu.

Two Betty M. Drees, M.D., Excellence in Mentoring Awards are presented each year. The Lifetime Achievement in Mentoring Award is for a faculty member with the rank of professor. The Excellence in Mentoring Award goes to a faculty member who is either an associate or assistant professor.

The awards recognize the significant contributions mentors make to enhance and develop the careers of our faculty and trainees. Characteristics of successful mentoring include generosity, listening, objectivity, and constructive feedback regarding career and professional/personal development.

The second annual Louise E. Arnold, Ph.D., Excellence in Medical Education Research Award will be given to a tenure track or nontenure track faculty member who has contributed to innovation and scholarship related to medical education at UMKC School of Medicine for a minimum of five years.

Nominations for the mentoring and medical education research awards should be sent to Dr. Rebecca R. Pauly, M.D., chair, selection committee, at paulyr@umkc.edu.

Winners of the awards will be announced on Sept. 7 during the annual Faculty Promotion and Awards reception at 4 p.m. in Theater B.

Prominent School of Medicine figures inducted to new Hospital Hill Run Hall of Fame

Members of Team Dimond represented the School of Medicine and founder E. Grey Dimond, M.D., at the 2017 Hospital Hill Run’s UMKC School of Medicine 5K race.

Two prominent figures from the UMKC School of Medicine were introduced into the new Hospital Hill Run Hall of Fame on June 1 during a VIP reception just prior to race weekend.

The inaugural class of inductees includes the two founding fathers of the Hospital Hill Run, UMKC School of Medicine founder E. Grey Dimond, M.D., and retired faculty member Ralph Hall, M.D.  Mark Curp, a local two-time Hospital Hill Run winner who held U.S. and world records in the half marathon from 1985 to 1990, was also part of the inaugural Hall of Fame class.

During the past 44 years, the race has grown from a single, 6.8-mile race with fewer than 100 runners to an annual event that boasts thousands of athletes competing in three different distances. Annually, it includes the UMKC School of Medicine 5K on Friday night, followed by a 10K and a half marathon on Saturday morning. Runner’s World magazine has touted the Hospital Hill Run as one of the top 25 road races in the United States.

The 2017 races were held June 2 and 3 with each beginning and ending on Grand Boulevard directly in front of Crown Center.

Fourth-year UMKC School of Medicine student Jordann Dhuse won the women’s 5K event.

Jordann Dhuse, a fourth-year student at the UMKC School of Medicine, won the women’s division of the School of Medicine 5K event in 23-minutes, 11-seconds, more than 40 seconds ahead of the second-place finisher in the women’s race.

More than 1,800 people took part in this year’s half-marathon, 10K and 5K events. Complete race results are available on the Hospital Hill Run website. Visit the UMKC School of Medicine Facebook page for more photos from the 5K race.

Dimond (1918-2013) was a devoted physician who dedicated his life to the practice of medicine, medical education and physical fitness. He scheduled a symposium of physical fitness to be held in May 1974 with the intent to combine the symposium with a running event. Dimond approached Hall, a UMKC faculty member and an endrocrinologist at Saint Luke’s Hospital, with the idea and together they created the Hospital Hill Run. For many years, Dimond experienced a great surge of happiness standing on the southwest corner of 25th and Holmes, cheering on thousands of runners as they competed in the event.

Hall was a runner in high school and college but had never managed a running event. He used his running network to secure a race organizer. For the first few years, Hall managed the medical tent to ensure that all runners would receive proper care if needed. In addition, he worked with various physicians to incorporate medical education courses before moving from Kansas City.

 

Hospital CMO Divya Shroff honored with 2017 Take Wing Award

Divya Shroff, M.D., ’00, F.H.M., with School of Medicine Dean Steven Kanter, M.D., received the 2017 E. Grey Dimond, M.D., Take Wing Award on Monday, May 22.

When word reached Divya Shroff, M.D., ’00, F.H.M., that she had been selected as winner of the 2017 UMKC School of Medicine E. Grey Dimond, M.D., Take Wing Award, tears filled her eyes.

“I’m not worthy,” Shroff said. “That was my first response.”

Her colleagues would beg to differ.

Having worked at two of the largest health care systems in the United States, Shroff has grown into a nationally recognized leader in bringing together medicine and technology to improve the quality of patient care.

Today, she is also responsible for the strategic leadership and oversight of a staff of nearly 1,800 physicians and advanced practitioners as chief medical officer of TriStar Centennial Medical Center, in Nashville, Tennessee. With that comes the duty of maintaining the highest standard of quality and clinical excellence for the flagship hospital of the nation’s largest for-profit health care corporation, Hospital Corporation of American (HCA).

It’s a goal that Shroff and her team have consistently met since she took on the physician leadership role in 2013. For the past five years, the hospital has earned an A+ rating for quality and safety from the Leapfrog Group, a national nonprofit organization that reports on hospital performance.

“It’s a very busy clinical facility and we want to make sure we’re meeting the quality standards,” Shroff said.

Shroff received this year’s Take Wing Award at the annual Take Wing Lectureship on Monday, May 22, at the School of Medicine.

Before her appointment at TriStar Centennial, Shroff joined HCA’s clinical services group as chief clinical transformation officer and vice president. The role made her responsible for implementing electronic health records systems throughout the corporation’s more than 170 hospitals. Only a small fraction of those were using electronic health records when she arrived. Within a few years, all HCA hospitals across 20 states were on board.

Shroff began building a resume as a physician leader and medical technology innovator at the Veterans Administration in Washington, D.C. She said she honed her skills by knowing and working closely with the folks in the IT department. Developing those relationships were important, as she played a vital role in projects such as using a Blackberry — before the days of the iPhone — to transmit EKGs to off-site cardiologists, developing an electronic providers hand-off tool, and implementing an interactive bedside TV for patients that communicates with the hospital’s electronic medical records system.

She said her time at the UMKC School of Medicine helped her build the skills necessary to be successful.

“I think it’s because of the core competencies the school teaches,” said Shroff. “We were put in the hospital environment at such a formative point in our careers. It allowed us to look at things innovatively. As a student, you are empowered in a way that many medical schools don’t allow.”

She said the experience teaches young physicians to take ownership of becoming outstanding patient care providers.

“What has allowed me to be successful in my role today is the foundation that I got from the UMKC School of Medicine,” Shroff said.

Now, part of Shroff’s task is to share that charge of maintaining the highest quality of patient care with the medical staff of a large, full-service community hospital that’s about to embark on a $120-million expansion. Leaders at TriStar Centennial are also exploring the idea of adding a graduate medical education program.

“We want to be the hospital of choice for Nashville,” Shroff said. “I’m honored to be part of that vision.”

Volunteers recognized for service at Sojourner Clinic

Student volunteers were recognized for their service at the Sojourner Clinic on May 5 during a banquet at Diastole.

The work of almost 250 student volunteers was recognized at the Sojourner Clinic’s annual year-end banquet on May 5 at Diastole.

Each Sunday since October 2004, students from the UMKC School of Medicine have volunteered the afternoon to care for the homeless and underprivileged living in the downtown area of Kansas City.

Today, the Sojourner Health Clinic continues to provide free health care for some of the city’s most vulnerable patients. Those volunteers have grown to include students from UMKC’s pharmacy, physician assistant, dental and dental hygiene programs. In the past year, students from Rockhurst College’s occupational therapy program have joined the effort.

Executive director of Sojourner, Peter Lazarz, said volunteers devoted more than 1,500 hours of service to treating patients in the past year.

The event also brings together faculty volunteers, financial supporters and community partners in celebration of the services provided to about 250 patients throughout the school year.

Several students were recognized for their individual dedication and service in the past year.

2017 Sojourner Clinic Awards
  • Top Year 1 Volunteer: Shruti Kumar
  • Top Year 2 Volunteer: Michele Yang
  • Top Year 3 Volunteer: Tong Cheng
  • Top Year 4 Volunteer: Bhavana Jasti
  • Top Year 5 Volunteer: Margaret Kirwin
  • Top Year 6 Volunteer: Eri Joyo
  • Top Physician Assistant Volunteer: Daniel Beck
  • Brook Nelson Award for Leadership: Priyesha Bijlani
  • Ellen Beck Award for Dedication: Eshwar Kishore
  • Angela Barnett Award for Humanism: Raga Kilaru
  • Dan Purdom Award for Commitment: Adithi Reddy