Tag Archives: Faculty

GHHS students lift patients’ spirits with Valentine’s Day visit

Members of the School of Medicine’s Gold Humanism Honor Society delivered roses and Valentine’s Day cards to patients at Truman Medical Center. See more photos on our Facebook page.

A Valentine’s Day visit from a group of nearly a dozen UMKC School of Medicine students brought smiles, and often tears, to patients at Truman Medical Center on Thursday, Feb. 14.

The fifth and sixth-year medical students are members of the school’s Gold Humanism Honor Society (GHHS). They and their faculty advisor, Carol Stanford, M.D., professor of medicine a School of Medicine docent, spent a portion of their morning presenting roses and Valentine’s cards to throughout the hospital.

“This is one of the few times of the year where we stop what we’re doing and just take some time to appreciate the patients,” said sixth-year med student Ami Purohit, a member of the GHHS.

For a number of years now, Stanford and her honor society students have delivered roses and cards to patients on Valentine’s Day as part of the GHHS Solidarity Week for Compassionate Patient Care.

Deven Bhatia, president of UMKC’s GHHS chapter, said the organization purchased 250 roses. Earlier in the week, the students invited others throughout the med school to join them in creating more than 200 hand-made Valentine’s cards.

This was Purohit’s second year to join Stanford and her GHHS classmates on their Valentine’s Day rounds. She said she found the experience rewarding.

“A lot of times our patients are sick and they may or may not have family members coming to see them,” she said. “When you give them their rose and Valentine’s card, I think they feel that the love is mutual and we are here to take care of them. We want to treat them like people and not just a patient room number. They appreciate that.”

Many patients responded with more than smiles. They broke down in tears as members of the group delivered a rose, a card and encouraging words, “Get well soon.”

“They were crying,” Purohit said. “You can see how touched they feel when we hand them a rose and a card. That’s what has made this tradition last. I think it’s going to be around for a long time, just knowing the impact it has on our patients.”

Last year, the School of Medicine received the Gold Humanism Honor Society’s Distinguished Chapter of the Year award. The honor recognizes the chapter’s impact, leadership, service activities and humanistic learning environment.

Stanford said the chapter received the award for its program excellence, which included a national “Thank A Resident Day” that started just two years ago at UMKC.

The GHHS has 150 chapters in medical schools and nearly a dozen residency programs throughout the United States.

Sirridge Office taking submissions for next issue of medical humanities magazine

The Sirridge Office of Medical Humanities is currently seeking submissions for a new edition of the medical humanities magazine, The Human Factor.

The magazine recognizes the important connection between medicine and the arts and their significant roles in strengthening physician-patient relationships. It also supports the “art” of medicine by showcasing creative works and sharing human experiences.

School of Medicine students, faculty and alumni are encouraged to submit original, unpublished essays, poems, short stories, drawings, photography and other art work. Past issues also have included shared experiences from classes, field trips and concerts.

The submission deadline for the next issue is April 30. Submissions should be sent to the Sirridge Office at 2411 Holmes St., Kansas City, MO 64108, Attn: Sarah McKee, or emailed to hallse@umkc.edu.

Local Wall of Respect coming to UMKC campuses

The Wall of Respect, a 12-foot yurt representing the diversity of cultures in Kansas City, is coming to the UMKC Health Sciences campus Feb. 4-8.

Fifty-one years ago, a group of Chicago artists created a community mural called the Wall of Respect that revitalized the neighborhood in the city’s South Side. Last year, in the same spirit, Kansas City’s Jewish Community Center created its own Wall of Respect to celebrate the diversity of cultures in the community.

That project, a 12-foot yurt decorated by local artists, will be on display in the third-floor atrium of the UMKC Health Sciences Building for one week beginning Feb. 4. The following week, Feb. 11-15, the yurt will be set up at UMKC’s Student Union.

Wall of RespectA yurt is a circular tent typically made of felt or animal skins mounted on a collapsible frame. The local Wall of Respect project was decorated by artists representing the African American, Jewish, Asian American, Latinx/Hispanic and Native American cultures that enhance the diversity of Kansas City. Murals are painted inside and outside the yurt as well as on the roof.

Tamica Lige is chair of the Health Sciences Diversity and Inclusion Council that is bringing Kansas City’s Wall of Respect to the university’s two campuses. The council is made up of representatives of the UMKC schools of Dentistry, Medicine, Nursing and Health Studies, and Pharmacy, Children’s Mercy, Saint Luke’s Health System and Truman Medical Center.

“This is a good way for us to be involved with not only spreading the message of diversity, but also an appreciation of the arts,” Lige said. “It’s exciting that we can bring this community piece that represents diversity and inclusion in Kansas City to our campuses.”

Lige said cutout handprints will be available for visitors to decorate and hang inside the yurt to share their own ideas and stories of culture.

Jill Maidhof, director of the Jewish Community Center, will lead a walking tour and give a presentation on the yurt at noon on Wednesday, Feb. 6, at the Health Sciences Building.

The yurt display is coming to UMKC as a leadup to the Health Sciences Diversity and Inclusion Council’s annual Harmony Gala event on Feb. 16. The annual dance event is a scholarship fundraiser for underrepresented minority students at the health sciences schools. Registration is still available online at umkcalumni.com/harmonygala.

“This is the perfect time to bring the yurt to campus, in conjunction with the Harmony Gala,” Lige said. “It’s about diversity, it’s inclusion, it’s recognizing disparities and trying to address them. It’s a way to visually represent where we want to go in representing the various cultures of our community within our schools.”

Lige said this will be the first time the yurt has visited UMKC.

“It’s exciting to have it at both campuses,” she said. “We’re looking forward to sharing it with the Volker campus. The majority of what we do is focused on students here on the health sciences campus. This gives us an opportunity to serve the greater student population of UMKC and that’s really rewarding.”

UMKC Gold Humanism Honor Society welcomes 2019 class

The School of Medicine’s Gold Humanism Honor Society welcomed its 2019 members during an induction ceremony on Jan. 26 at Diastole.

The School of Medicine’s Gold Humanism Honor Society recognized 34 new members during its annual induction ceremony on Jan. 26 at Diastole. This year’s class includes 20 students, 11 residents or fellows, and three faculty members.

One faculty member, Matt Gratton, M.D., professor and chair of emergency medicine, was also recognized as the recipient of this year’s Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine Award.

This is the 16th consecutive year that the UMKC chapter has inducted new members into the national organization. Students are selected from nominations made by colleagues. Faculty, residents and fellows are chosen based on their excellence in clinical care, leadership, compassion and dedication to service. All members are selected for their exemplary care of patients and their humanistic approach to clinical practice.

With support from the Gold Foundation, the School of Medicine established its chapter of the honor society in 2004. A Graduate Medical Education chapter was added in 2014 specifically for School of Medicine residents.

Carol Stanford, M.D., associate professor of medicine and docent, serves as faculty sponsor for school’s chapter of the honor society. Stanford recognized each of this year’s inductees during the ceremony.

The School of Medicine chapter of the honor society serve as an ambassador to the school and Truman Medical Center in providing students, residents and fellows with opportunities to serve others.

Established in 2002 by the Arnold P. Gold Foundation, the Gold Humanism Honor Society has more than 30,000 members nationally in training or practice. It recognizes 149 undergraduate medical education and 14 graduate medical education chapters at medical schools throughout the country.

Members are viewed by their peers as role models for humanistic care within their communities. The society also provides educational events, supports research, promotes professional growth and creates networking opportunities.

2019 Gold Humanism Honor Society

Students
Ariana Fotouhi
Elsa George
Chizitam Ibezim
Akash Jani
Athira Jayan
Jessica Kieu
Anusha Kodidhi
Taylor Lind
Robert Link
Rmaah Memon
Anthony Oyekan
Zach Randall
Adithi Reddy
Michele Sun
Erica Swanson
Brandon Trandai
Krishna Trivedi
Nicole Underwood
Jennifer Vu
Timothy Weber

Residents / Fellows
Islam Abdelkarim (Internal Medicine)
Waled Bahaj (Internal Medicine)
Scott Biggerstaff (Internal Medicine/Pediatrics)
Clarence Dye (Emergency Medicine)
Suguni Loku Galappaththy (Internal Medicine)
Robert Garner (Pediatrics)
Kristen Jones (Internal Medicine/Pediatrics)
Shahryar Khan (Internal Medicine)
Peter Lazarz (Community and Family Medicine)
Lyla Saeed (Internal Medicine)
Jared Willard (Internal Medicine/Pediatrics)

Faculty
Matt Gratton, M.D., (TMC) GHHS and Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine Award recipient
Daniel Pauly, M.D. (TMC)
Brandt Wible, M.D. (Saint Luke’s Hospital)

Dr. Robert Riss selected as assistant dean for career advising

The School of Medicine has announced that Robert Riss, M.D., associate professor of pediatrics and pediatric hospitalist at Children’s Mercy Kansas City, will serve as the next assistant dean for career advising.

In his new role at the School of Medicine, Riss will be responsible for oversight of all career advising services.

Riss is an associate director of medical student education and director of curriculum for the highly regarded pediatric clerkship at Children’s Mercy. His leadership in revising the pediatric clerkship curriculum using a scholarly approach and innovative facilitation of technology is cited as a reason for improved performance of students taking their NBME exams.

He has served on many leadership committees at UMKC and Childrens’ Mercy and currently serves as co-chair of the Medical Student Education Special Interest Group with the Academic Pediatric Association. He is also a faculty member of the association after recently completing the organization’s Educational Scholars Program.

Riss has received many awards for teaching and leadership including UMKC’s Elmer F. Pierson Good Teaching Award, as well as the Children’s Mercy Gold Apple Mercy Mentor Award and a faculty award for outstanding teaching support of student medical education.

He currently participates in educational research focusing on curriculum design, evaluation and implementation utilizing technology. He is an educational consultant on the NIH grant: SPeCTRE: The Sunflower Pediatric Clinical Trials Research Extension in which he is charged with designing a curriculum for primary care physicians to increase the research capacity for pediatrics in the state of Kansas.

Riss received his medical degree from the University of Kansas School of Medicine and completed his postdoctoral training as a pediatrics resident at Children’s Mercy Kansas City.

 

Researcher Karl Kador receives Research to Prevent Blindness award

Karl Kador, Ph.D.

School of Medicine researcher Karl Kador, Ph.D.,  has received a $75,000 award from the Research to Prevent Blindness/Stavros Niarchos Foundation International Research Collaborators.

The grant is intended to support and promote international collaborations among researchers in the United States and abroad to gain new scientific knowledge and skills through activities within the department of ophthalmology. A researcher at the UMKC Vision Research Center, Kador has been working to develop a novel approach for treating patients suffering end-stage glaucoma.

Last year, Kador received a nearly $2-million National Institutes of Health grant to explore tissue engineering that could one day lead to a method of transplanting new retinal ganglion cells to replace old, dead cells.

The Research to Prevent Blindness award allows researchers to spend time working with one another to advance specific research goals. These international collaborations can have a positive impact on a world-wide population. They have the potential to speed the development of treatments for illnesses that lead to blindness.

SOM faculty, Children’s Mercy hospital spotlighted in TV documentary

School of Medicine faculty and partner hospital Children’s Mercy Kansas City return to the spotlight on Jan. 27 and Jan. 30 for Season 3 of Inside Pediatrics.

The Emmy Award-winning documentary looks at world-class pediatric health care through the stories of patients and their families from the Kansas City area and beyond, and the professionals who take care of them. Actor Paul Rudd, a Kansas City area native, is narrator for the series that will air at 6 p.m. on Jan. 27 and at 7 p.m. on Jan. 30 on KMBC Channel 9.

These episodes feature brave families who have allowed cameras to follow them and capture their heartwarming and sometimes heartbreaking moments.

View the Season 3 trailer at https://www.facebook.com/InsidePediatrics/videos/1844276945698313.

All of the episodes and additional bonus video are available on the web site at www.InsidePediatrics.com. Viewers can also visit www.facebook.com/InsidePediatrics for information and to share their thoughts and support.

School of Medicine researcher receives NIH award for study of sepsis

Fu, Mingui
Mingui Fu, Ph.D.

The National Institutes of Health recently awarded School of Medicine researcher Mingui Fu, Ph.D.,  associate professor of biomedical sciences, a $465,000 grant to conduct a study of sepsis-induced systemic inflammation.

Fu said that when completed, his research could significantly advance scientists’ understanding of the regulatory mechanisms surrounding septic pathogenesis and identify a new therapeutic target to treat the devastating condition.

A potentially life-threatening illness, sepsis is a major health concern. It strikes nearly 700,000 people in the United States each year with a 30 percent mortality rate. A major contributor to mortality is sepsis-induced systemic inflammation followed by multi-organ injury.

Sepsis appears when infectious bacteria or other organisms enter the blood stream and cause an inflammatory immune response. There is currently no specific treatment available for sepsis.

Fu’s study will look at the essential role of a particular protein known as myeloid MCPIP1 in sepsis-induced systemic inflammation and death. It will also explore whether MCPIP1 may be a target for pharmacological therapy to improve the outcome of sepsis.

Charlie Inboriboon, M.D., associate professor of emergency medicine, will serves as a co-investigator on the study, which will also include the research efforts of School of Medicine students.

Med school faculty lead local summit on lung cancer

School of Medicine faculty members led a local summit on advanced non-small cell lung cancer, discussing novel treatments for patients with lung cancer on Dec. 11.

The State of the Science Summit brought together academic and community-based physicians and health care professionals across disciplines from clinical and surgical oncology to hematology.

Janakiraman Subramanian, M.D., M.P.H, assistant professor of medicine and director of thoracic oncology at Saint Luke’s Cancer Institute chaired the event. Additional faculty members J. Russell Davis, M.D., cinical assistant professor of surgery; Vinay Gupta, M.D., clinical assistant professor of medicine; Timothy Saettele, M.D., assistant professor of medicine; and internal medicine fellow Brandon Weckbaugh, M.D., made up a panel of expert presenters.

The panel discussed topics such as advances in robotic thoracic lung cancer surgery, bronchoscopies and biopsies, immunotherapy, targeted therapies and emerging biomarkers in NSCLC.

The State of the Science Summit series is sponsored by OncLive, a digital resource for practicing oncologists.

American Heart Association honors Dr. John Spertus with Distinguished Scientist Award

John Spertus, M.D., M.P.H., professor of medicine and Daniel J. Lauer, M.D., Endowed Chair in Metabolism and Vascular Disease Research, was honored with the American Heart Association’s 2018 Distinguished Scientist Award.

John Spertus, M.D., M.P.H., professor of medicine and Daniel J. Lauer, M.D., Endowed Chair in Metabolism and Vascular Disease Research, received the American Heart Association’s 2018 Distinguished Scientist Award on Nov. 11 at the AHA Scientific Sessions in Chicago.

The award recognizes prominent scientists and clinicians who have made significant and sustained contributions to advancing the understanding, management and treatment of cardiovascular disease and stroke.

As clinical director of outcomes research at Saint Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute, Spertus developed technology that guides physicians and patients in medical-decision making by using models to measure and predict the risk factors of various procedures. Many experts cite two tools he created — the Seattle Angina Questionnaire and the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire — as the gold standards for measuring symptoms, function and quality of life in treating coronary artery disease and heart failure. Both have been translated into more than 95 languages.

“I am humbled by the honor to be recognized by the AHA for our work to improve the patient-centeredness of care,” Spertus said. “While traditionally the basic sciences are prioritized, to see the work of our community to improve care and outcomes is a terrific validation of the collective efforts of my entire team and colleagues.”

Spertus is the founder of two outcomes research organizations. The Cardiovascular Outcomes Research Consortium and CV Outcomes is a non-profit corporation dedicated to advancing health care quality and outcomes research in cardiovascular disease. The Health Outcomes Sciences is an information technology company that implements precision medicine in clinical care.

He is currently leading a regional effort with BioNexus KC and the Frontiers CTSA to bring local hospitals together in collaboration to improve the value of health care in Kansas City.

This is Spertus’ third major award from the AHA. He previously received the organization’s Lifetime Achievement Award in 2015 and the Council on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Distinguished Achievement Award in 2013.