Tag Archives: Residents and Fellows

SOM students place second, third in Missouri ACP research competition

Fifth-year medical student Hunter Faris won second place in the student research competition at the 2017 meeting of the Missouri Chapter of American College of Physicians.
Ravali Gummi, sixth-year medical student, placed third in the Missouri-ACP student research competition.

Hunter Faris, MS 5, and Ravali Gummi, MS 6, received two of the top student research awards from the Missouri Chapter of the American College of Physicians. The UMKC students earned the honor during the association’s 2017 meetings at Osage Beach, Missouri.

Faris received the second-place award for his poster on “Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors Inhibit Src Family Tyrosine Kinase Phosphorylation in the rat striatum.”

Gummi placed third in the competition with her poster on “Intracellular calcium channel expression in autoimmune encephalomyelitis.”

Hunter and Gummi were among five students and 15 residents who made presentations at the annual meeting. The Missouri ACP competition drew 20 student posters and 80 posters from residents and fellows of medical schools throughout the state.

 

 

Neurology residency, endocrinology fellowship add to school’s offerings

The School of Medicine’s graduate programs have expanded with a residency in neurology and a fellowship in endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism.

The neurology residency started July 1 with two residents, Dr. Ellen Troudt and Dr. Nikita Maniar. Troudt, currently at Truman Medical Center, and Maniar, at Saint Luke’s Hospital, will work for a year in internal medicine and then three years in neurology. Research Medical Center, Children’s Mercy Hospital and the Center for Behavioral Medicine also are affiliates for the residency.

Troudt
Maniar

Dr. Charles Donohoe, the Neurology Department chairman and associate professor of neurology, said adding the residency was “integral to sustaining the TMC-UMKC neurology program.”

“Five years ago we had no full-time neurology faculty,” said Donohoe. “Now we have five faculty members in the Neurology Department, and to add a residency in such a short time is quite an achievement. We also think it’s important to have a solid neurology presence at a safety net hospital such as Truman.”

Now that the program is underway, Donohoe said, it will use the match system next year and aim to add three physicians a year, eventually having a dozen residents. Dr. Sean Gratton, who is the program director, said this was “the first new residency program at TMC or UMKC in many years.”

Troudt is from New York and earned her medical degree at the Ross University School in the Caribbean island nation of Dominica. Donohoe said she had recently worked in cutting-edge stroke treatment as part of an ambulance team that had the rare advantage of having a CT scanner in their vehicle.

Maniar is from Florida and also earned her medical degree in the Caribbean, at the St. George’s University School of Medicine in Grenada. She then earned an MBA there and recently was a research fellow at the Brooklyn Hospital Center in New York.

The new endocrinology position is a two-year fellowship held by Dr. Maha Abu Kishk, an internist who earned her medical degree in 2003 and has been a hospitalist with Truman Medical Centers. This fellowship is affiliated with Hellman & Rosen Endocrine Associates, which will be a primary training site along with Truman Medical Center.

“We’re excited to add this fellowship, which helps address the shortage of endocrinologists,” said Dr. Betty Drees, professor of medicine and program director for the fellowship. “As diabetes continues to increase in prevalence, so does the need for endocrinologists.” 

School of Medicine welcomes 2017 inductees to Gold Humanism Honor Society

The UMKC School of Medicine inducted a new class of students and residents into the Gold Humanism Honor Society on Jan. 21 during a ceremony at Diastole.

The School of Medicine’s Gold Humanism Honor Society welcomed the 2017 class of inductees during its annual induction ceremony on Jan. 21 at Diastole.

It is the 14th consecutive year that the UMKC chapter has recognized students with induction into the national organization. The 18 students selected are chosen from nominations made by colleagues and faculty based on their excellence in clinical care, leadership, compassion and dedication to service. Members are selected for their exemplary care of patients and their humanistic approach to clinical practice.

With funding support from the Gold Foundation, the School of Medicine established its chapter of the honor society in 2004. A Graduate Medical Education chapter was added in 2014 specifically for School of Medicine/Truman Medical Center residents.

This year’s class of inductees included 13 UMKC medical residents and fellows. Renee Cation, M.D., assistant professor of pediatrics, and Gary Salzman, M.D., professor of medicine and Green 6 docent, were this year’s faculty inductees. Salzman was inducted as this year’s faculty recipient of the Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine Award.

Carol Stanford, M.D., is faculty sponsor for school’s chapter of the honor society. Stanford said the organization is focused on volunteerism and continues to serve as an ambassador to the School of Medicine and Truman Medical Center in providing students, residents and fellows with opportunities to serve others.

Established in 2002 by the Arnold P. Gold Foundation, the Gold Humanism Honor Society today has more than 24,000 members nationally. It recognizes 144 undergraduate medical education and 14 graduate medical education chapters at medical schools throughout the country.

Members are viewed by their peers as role models for humanistic care within their communities. The society also provides educational events, supports research, promotes professional growth and creates networking opportunities.

UMKC School of Medicine
Gold Humanism Honor Society

2017 Inductees

Students
Yembur Ahmad
Cody Braun
Kelsey Brown
Sanju Eswaran
Morgan Gonder
Ravali Gummi
Asdullah Helal
Max Holtmann
Ahsan Hussain
Michael Keirsey
Suzan Lisenby
Amena Mohiuddin
Nilbhi Patel
Alexandra Reinbold
David Sanborn
Meghna Singh
Claire Smith
Harris Zamir

Residents/Fellows
Talal Asif, MD
Jeff Beckett, MD
Denise Cardenal, MD
Stephane Desouches, DO
Sean Doran, DO
Wilson Harrison, MD
Badar Hasan, MD
Sarah Nazeer, MD
Braden Price, DO
Jacob Rouquette, MD
Raj Shah, MD
Jenny Shen, MD
Paul Williams, DO

Faculty
Dr. Renee Cation
*Dr. Gary Salzman
*(2017 Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine recipient)

 

 

UMKC fellow receives Ob/Gyn scientific awards at national meeting

School of Medicine fellow Gustavo Vilchez, M.D., (left) with Tom Sullivan, M.D., vice chair and clerkship director of the UMKC School of Medicine Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

Gustavo Vilchez, M.D., a maternal-fetal medicine fellow in the School of Medicine’s Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, received two major scientific awards from the Central Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

Vilchez received the Central Prize Award, the association’s major scientific award, for his abstract, “The Risk of Expectant Management of Low Risk Pregnancy at Term and Optimal Timing of Delivery: A National Population-Based Study.”

He also received the Dr. Jack A. Pritchard Memorial Award for his research paper on “Racial/Ethnic Disparity in Magnesium Sulfate Adverse Effects: Sub-Group Analysis of a Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial.”

The awards are given for outstanding investigative or clinical work in obstetrics and gynecology. Vilchez presented his research projects as part of the scientific program during the organization’s annual meeting in Las Vegas, Nevada, in October.

 

School of Medicine sets aside day to recognize residents, fellows

ResidentsDay
The School of Medicine will take a day to recognize its residents and fellows with the first Resident/Fellow Appreciation Day on Feb. 25.

Colleagues cheered on Joanne “Jo” Marasigan, a second-year orthopedic resident at the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, in a crutches/walker/wheelchair relay race. “Go Flo-Jo!”

Marasigan and 20 of her physician-in-training colleagues also competed in casting and suturing competitions, using medical guidelines, in an OrthOlympics, all part of a pilot program conceptualized by the UMKC School of Medicine to create a National Resident/Fellow Appreciation Day Feb. 25.

“It’s a great idea because every health profession gets a day of recognition,” Marasigan said between jovial competitions. “We get lumped in with other doctors but really, we’re a subset of doctors who work much longer hours. There’s a lot at stake here: a day off as the gold medal.”

There are more than 120,000 residents and fellows — physicians in training — in the United States. Called housestaff, residents and fellows work long hours, typically up to 80 per week, at a much lower salary than healthcare professionals who have completed training. Marasigan’s colleague, James Barnes, M.D., developed the idea for a national recognition day after seeing other healthcare professions honored.

“UMKC has over 400 physicians in training who contribute nearly 1.5 million hours a year to serve patients and gain practical experience and expertise,” said Barnes, the UMKC Housestaff Council President and event organizer. “To our knowledge, there is no national day designated to recognize this unique set of healthcare workers.”

As institutional sponsor of the residency and fellowship programs, the UMKC School of Medicine and clinical training partners including Truman Medical Centers, Saint Luke’s Hospital of Kansas City, Children’s Mercy, Center for Behavioral Medicine and Kansas City VA Medical Center are participating with catered meals, snacks, banners, gifts and special events to recognize the residents and fellows.

Various departments are celebrating in unique ways, such as hula dancing and yoga sessions for the Department of Emergency Medicine. Several departments are having catered on-site pancakes, and Barnes’ department, Orthopedic Surgery, held the “OrthOlympics.”

Barnes is also conducting a research project in collaboration with faculty mentor and Orthopedic Program Director, James Bogener, M.D., on the effects of the recognition and appreciation on residents/fellows. Barnes and Bogener are conducting a survey to gauge residents’ and fellows’ thoughts on the day and how it affects their perception of the workplace and their satisfaction.

This event has been made possible through the facilitation of the UMKC School of Medicine Housestaff Council and the Council on Graduate Medical Education. The UMKC councils’ goal is to present the event to national organizations including the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), American Medical Association (AMA) and American Osteopathic Association (AOA) to make Resident and Fellow Appreciation Day a day of recognition nationally for all residents and fellows.

“We are proud, but not surprised, that our residents and fellows at the UMKC School of Medicine conceptualized this important event,” said Steven L. Kanter, M.D., dean of the UMKC School of Medicine. “We look forward to celebrating their critical contributions as integral members of the patient-care team.”

 

School of Medicine fellows receive research awards

Gustavo Vilchez, M.D., (left) and Shilpa Babbar, M.D., (right) with Dev Maulik, M.D., chairman of obstetrics and gynecology and senior associate dean for women's health.
School of Medicine fellows Gustavo Vilchez, M.D., (left) and Shilpa Babbar, M.D., (right) with Dev Maulik, M.D., chairman of obstetrics and gynecology and senior associate dean for women’s health.

Two maternal-fetal medicine fellows received high honors from the Central Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists for their research activity at the School of Medicine.

Shilpa Babbar, M.D., a third-year fellow, received the organization’s President’s Certificate of Merit for her research project, “Acute Fetal Behavioral Response to Prenatal Yoga: A Single Blinded, Randomized Controlled Trial (TRY Yoga).” The award is given for outstanding investigative or clinical efforts in obstetrics and gynecology.

First-year fellow Gusavo Vilchez, M.D., received the Young Investigator’s Award for his research project, “Body Mass Index and Magnesium Sulfate Neuroprotection: A Secondary Analysis From a Multicenter Randomized Control Trial.” The award is presented to residents, fellows, students and new practitioners for outstanding research in obstetrics and gynecology.

Babbar and Vilchez received their awards during the organization’s annual meeting earlier this year in Charleston, South Carolina. The non-profit association represents more than 700 physicians in promoting the study of obstetrics and gynecology and women’s health care through continuing education and scientific research.

Babbar and Vilchez are also students in the school’s Master of Science in Bioinformatics program.

SOM fellow also teaches yoga at national meeting

Shilpa Babbar, M.D., a second year fellow in the School of Medicine's Maternal-Fetal Medicine Fellowship program, taught yoga classes when she wasn't busy with meetings at the Society of Maternal-Fetal Medicine meetings in San Diego this past February.
Shilpa Babbar, M.D., a second-year fellow in the School of Medicine’s Maternal-Fetal Medicine Fellowship program, taught yoga classes when she wasn’t busy with meetings at the Society of Maternal-Fetal Medicine meetings in San Diego this past February.

Shilpa Babbar, M.D., has her own way of coping with the stress of being a second-year maternal-fetal medicine fellow in the School of Medicine program.

Yoga.

Babbar doesn’t just practice it herself. She’s also a registered yoga instructor and volunteered to teach yoga classes for her maternal-fetal medicine colleagues in February at the 35th annual Society of Maternal-Fetal Medicine meetings in San Diego.

Babbar taught yoga classes twice daily to 99 of the more than 2,000 physicians attending the medical conference. Babbar led the group in practicing yoga postures, while watching the sun rise and set on the hotel lawn.

Participants received personalized yoga mats and carrying cases and, in turn, the classes raised more than $4,000 for the Society of Maternal-Fetal Medicine. A portion of the proceeds also went to the Pregnancy Foundation, which supports development of research and clinical skills in maternal-fetal medicine.

Babbar said she thought the classes were well received and the meeting organizers hope to offer yoga classes at the organization’s future meetings.

UMKC goes Smoke-Free on Aug. 1

SmokeFreeBannerA program to clear the air across UMKC begins on Aug. 1 when the Hospital Hill and Volker campuses embark on a new smoke-free, tobacco-free policy. UMKC students, employees and vistors will no longer be allowed to smoke on University property, including parking garages.

Smoking will be prohibited inside all University buildings, but will be permitted outdoors off UMKC property. University properties include, but are not limited to:

  • All outdoor common and educational areas; inside all university owned or leased buildings
  • Campus sidewalks
  • Campus parking lots
  • Recreational areas
  • Outdoor stadiums
  • University-owned and leased vehicles (regardless of location)

The smoking ban does not apply to public rights-of-way (sidewalks/streets) within the campus boundaries, as these are governed by City of Kansas City ordinance.

The University will offer aid to smokers with a desire to quit with a smoking cessation coach and other resources.

“I understand that this change may be difficult for those of you who smoke,” UMKC  Chancellor Leo Morton said. “For employees and students who would like to stop, the university will work in conjunction with Healthy for Life, the Student Health and Wellness Center and other resources that offer cessation programs. In some cases, cessation tools and nicotine replacement therapy will be free to students and employees.”

The policy change comes as a result of a student-led initiative that indicated a significant majority of employees and students of the University value smoke and tobacco-free campuses. The policy reaffirms the University’s commitment to provide a safe and healthy physicial envoironment for its students, staff, faculty, patients and the general public.

Visit the University’s policy page to learn more about the smoke-free initiative.

 

Published study on obese women and breastfeeding garners attention

Felix Oka, M.D.
Felix Oka, M.D.

New mothers who want to breastfeed their babies would do well to watch their weight according to a collaborative study by a group that includes Felix Oka, M.D., M.S., professor of pediatrics and assistant dean for career advising, and fellows Teresa Orth, M.D, and Shilpa Babbar, M.D.

The research conducted by a team of investigators from the School of Medicine, Children’s Mercy Kansas City and the Kansas University Medical Center showed that obesity significantly reduces the chances of a woman ever breastfeeding. Women who are obese are 16 percent less likely to be able to breastfeed than women whose weight falls within a normal range, the study reported. Orth presented results and highlights of the study at the April 26-30 annual meeting of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology in Chicago.

Results were based on a survey of more than 66,000 mothers in the United States conducted between 2009 and 2010. Identifying obesity as a high-risk group for not breastfeeding could help clinicians to design future interventions for overweight mothers.

The student is also the focus of a recent article published in Live Science.