Tag Archives: Staff

Digital bulletin board enhances campus communication

A new blue and gold kiosk on the sidewalk between the School of Medicine and the Health Sciences Building will provide up-to-date information on university and city services.

The kiosk is one of eight located on UMKC’s Health Sciences and Volker campuses. UMKC is the first university in the U.S. to install the CityPost digital kiosks. Resembling giant smart phones, the kiosks are similar to those along Kansas City’s streetcar route.

“As Kansas City’s university, we are committed to connecting our community to the rich resources available in our city,” said UMKC Chancellor C. Mauli Agrawal. “We’re thrilled to be the first university in the nation to benefit from CityPost kiosks. Leading on the forefront of change and progress fits our vision of what UMKC should be all about. These kiosks are just one visible, tangible indicator of that vision.”

The digital kiosks are part of a communication network that broadcasts real-time, location-based information and alerts to provide safer, better connected public digital solutions. Information is powered by 55-inch smart screens and a companion CityPost mobile application. UMKC CityPost, in partnership with Duke Energy, is a wholly owned subsidiary of Smart City Media LLC of New York, the same creator of the kiosks along the Kansas City streetcar line.

As Kansas City’s university, UMKC was invited to be the first campus site in the U.S. for CityPost. No public or tuition dollars are used to fund the system.

“We are honored to better connect the students and faculty to all the great things at UMKC, and to help build a stronger information bridge from the campus to the greater Kansas City community, said Tom Touchet, CEO of Smart City Media LLC. “CityPost is a connected campus bulletin board and this is UMKC’s very own channel. We look forward to all of the new and innovative communications that our publishing tools will help provide. A college is a small city in itself and nobody understands how better to communicate within it like the students and faculty. We look forward to empowering them to use our new tools, and do new things.”

Using touch-screen technology on the 7-foot-tall UMKC CityPost blue-and-gold kiosks, visitors to campuses can learn more about student services, dining options, UMKC and KC events, where to discover art and whento enjoy sporting events throughout the city. The kiosks also include local news, bike-rental info, walking maps and a selfie app.

“We’re proud to be a part of bringing digital infrastructure solutions to forward looking communities such as UMKC,” added Michael Luhrs, Duke Energy vice president of customer solutions. “We expect our partnership with Smart City Media to significantly accelerate across North America and help enable what smart cities are all about.”

“Rather than hunching over separate mobile phones, students and visitors can explore campus and Kansas City together,” said UMKC Provost Barbara A. Bichelmeyer. “The UMKC CityPost kiosks provide students and visitors the chance to explore campus and Kansas City communally.”

Chelladurai presenting AAMC program on professional development for student affairs

Cary Chelladurai, manager of student affairs at the School of Medicine, is working with the AAMC to present its professional Development Initiative to medical school student affairs leaders across the country.

More than 20 new medical schools have opened in the United States in the last 10 years, including a dozen in the past five years alone. And more are on the way.

As manager of the UMKC School of Medicine Office of Student Affairs, Cary Chelladurai understands some of the unique challenges student affairs leaders will face in establishing and maintaining their own departments.

Chelladurai has been working with the Association of American Medical Colleges since earlier this year, sharing its Professional Development Initiative program with other medical school student affairs associate deans, department managers and supervisors.

The AAMC is made of up of all 151 accredited medical schools in the United States and 17 in Canada. In 2016, the national organization’s Group on Student Affairs crafted the Professional Development Initiative to support its members’ student affairs offices.

After attending the AAMC’s first professional development workshop at a national meeting in 2016 and participating in subsequent webinars, Chelladurai implemented the program’s tools at the UMKC School of Medicine.

“We used them with restructuring our office,” said Chelladurai, who has served in her current position since 2012. “We’ve used them with rewriting job descriptions and, being short-staffed, deciding what duties are most important. It’s a framework and a tool that helps us figure that out so we don’t have to do it from scratch.”

Last February, the AAMC asked Chelladurai and a colleague at the University of Alabama to serve as subject matter experts on the program and present it to others at medical schools across the country. The two teamed up to present the material to about 30 student affairs leaders at the AAMC’s national conference in April.

They began offering a series of three online virtual classroom video conferences earlier this summer. The series provides interactive and collaborative discussions and personalized case studies that explore challenges that student affairs departments have faced. The first online video conference took place in July with following sessions slated for September and October.

The entire program highlights eight specific areas of focus for student affairs offices. It also provides a support network for making programs relative in a changing environment and to help student affairs professionals realize their own potential and career fulfillment.

“We’re talking to our colleagues across the country, telling them how we have personally used this program and giving them ideas about how they can use it at their own medical schools,” Chelladurai said. “It’s helpful to the new medical schools that haven’t developed their student affairs departments yet but they’re in their planning stages. They can use it to make sure they have someone covering all the areas of focus.”

It’s also beneficial to more established student affairs offices that are working to find new and better ways to serve their student populations.

“This information and the tools are free and they’re online, so even if a school can’t afford to send someone to a conference, they can benefit from these tools,” Chelladurai said. “That’s one of the good things about the virtual classroom series. They don’t have to travel. We’re teaching this to 25 of our colleagues across the country. They just need to tune in for a couple of hours three times and they’re getting the professional development instead of spending the money and time travelling to a conference.”

Kansas City Marathon offers UMKC School of Medicine discount

The UMKC School of Medicine is serving as a Gold Sponsor of the 2018 Kansas City Marathon, and race organizers are excited to offer a 15 percent discount on race registration fees to all  faculty, staff, students and residents. This year’s event will take place on Oct. 20 with four race distances to chose from — 5K, 10K, half marathon or full marathon.

The discount code can be used for any of the KC Marathon’s race distances. The event is open to walkers as well as runners.

To get the discount, simply copy and paste or enter 15OFF2018KCM in the “Got a discount code?” box near the end of the online registration process at www.kcmarathon.org. Please note that this discount code is case sensitive. It must be entered exactly as it appears.

Why should you participate in the Kansas City Marathon on October 20?

  • This is Kansas City’s largest and most exciting race. It gives runners a tour of the city’s most beautiful landmarks and interesting neighborhoods, including the World War I Memorial, the Country Club Plaza, the Nelson Atkins Museum of Art, Waldo, Westport, 18th & Vine and more.
  • The race has distance options for all fitness levels with a 5K, 10K, half marathon and full marathon.
  • There are fireworks to kick off the race and a huge after party with live music, free food and free beer!
  • All runners will receive a participant shirt, a large finisher’s medal, free downloadable race photos and more.
  • After you conquer the Kansas City hills, you’ll be rewarded with a lightning-fast downhill finish that includes a breathtaking view of the Kansas City skyline!
  • Still not sure? Click here to check out their 2017 recap video to learn what the Kansas City Marathon is all about.

School of Medicine seeks nominations for annual awards

The School of Medicine is accepting nominations until Aug. 1 for four faculty, staff and student awards. These will recognize achievements in diversity and health equity, mentoring, medical education research and teaching.

The Excellence in Diversity and Health Equity in Medicine Awards recognize an individual or organization that has demonstrated sustained and impactful contribution to diversity, inclusion and cultural competency or health equity. The award is given to a student or student organization, and to faculty, staff, resident and/or organization/department.

Nominees should be those who have made consistent contributions to diversity, inclusion, cultural competency or health equity through one or more of the following:

o Recruiting or retaining a diverse student or faculty body;
o Fostering an inclusive environment for success of all;
o Working to promote health equity and the elimination of health disparities;
o Strengthening efforts to develop or implement cultural competency strategies that improve health-care delivery.

Nomination materials should be sent to the attention of Dr. Nate Thomas, Associate Dean for Diversity and Inclusion at thomasen@umkc.edu

Two Betty M. Drees, M.D., Excellence in Mentoring Awards are presented each year. The Lifetime Achievement in Mentoring Award is for a faculty member with the rank of professor. The Excellence in Mentoring Award goes to a faculty member who is either an associate or assistant professor.

The awards recognize the significant contributions mentors make to enhance and develop the careers of our faculty and trainees. Characteristics of successful mentoring include generosity, listening, objectivity, and constructive feedback regarding career and professional/personal development.

The third annual Louise E. Arnold, Ph.D., Excellence in Medical Education Research Award will be given to a tenure track or non-tenure track faculty member who has contributed to innovation and scholarship related to medical education at UMKC School of Medicine for a minimum of five years.

The second annual Christopher Papasian, Ph.D., Excellence in Teaching Award will be given to a tenure track or nontenure track faculty member who has contributed to medical student pre-clinical education.

Nominations for the mentoring, medical education research and teaching awards should be sent to Dr. Rebecca R. Pauly, chair, selection committee, at paulyr@umkc.edu.

Winners of the awards will be announced on Sept. 13th during the annual Faculty Promotion and Awards reception at 4 p.m. in Theater B.

Past award recipients:

Excellence in Diversity and Health Equity in Medicine Awards
Individual:
2015 Jim Stanford
2016 Fariha Shafi
2017 Briana Woods-Jaeger
Organization:
2015 Asian Pacific American Medical Student Association
2016 Asian Pacific American Medical Student Association
2017 Gender Pathways

Betty M. Drees, M.D. Excellence in Mentoring Awards
Lifetime Achievement Awards:
2014 Vidya Sharma
2015 John Foxworth
2016 Agostino Molteni
2017 Julie Strickland

Excellence in Mentoring Awards:
2014 Simon Kaja
2015 Vincent Barone
2016 Pamela Nicklaus
2017 Brenda Rogers

Louise E. Arnold, Ph.D., Excellence in Medical Education Research Award
2016 Louise Arnold
2017 Stefanie Ellison

Christopher Papasian, Ph.D., Excellence in Teaching Research
2017 Christopher Papasian

Reception planned for retiring Education Team Coordinator Mary Pirotte

Senior Education Team Coordinator Mary Pirotte, a longtime staff member of the Office of Student Affairs, will retire from the School of Medicine at the end of June.

Pirotte has served as ETC for the Blue unit for the last 14 years. She started as an education assistant for the Gold unit in 1989. During her time at the school, she has been a member of the curriculum council and the evaluation council. And she has worked with every dean of the medical school in some capacity.

A reception is planned from 3:30-5 p.m. on June 28 in the fifth-floor Biomedical and Health Informatics conference room, M5-103.

Hospital Hill overcomes weather for another successful run

Nearly 2,900 runners outlasted the weather on June 2 to take part in the 2018 Hospital Hill Run that was sponsored by the UMKC Health Sciences District.

From extreme heat on Friday to high winds and a menacing storm front early Saturday, the weather caused big worries just before the 2018 Hospital Hill Run, sponsored by the UMKC Health Sciences District. But after the starting horn sounded at 7:30 Saturday morning, June 2, cloudy skies and temperatures in the 60s prevailed, making it a good day for the races.

Mid-90s heat caused the usual Friday evening 5K to be pushed to 7 a.m. Saturday, when the 7.7-mile and half-marathon races also were to begin. Because of lightning and a brewing storm, that start time was delayed an additional 30 minutes. But the big storm never materialized along the race routes, and all three runs started and finished in good order at Crown Center.

This was the 45th year for the race, which drew more than 2,800 entrants for its three distances, and the first year for the UMKC Health Sciences District to be the lead sponsor of the race.  Several of the dozen institutions that make up the district also provided the physicians, nurses, students and other health care professionals to staff the medical tent for runners in distress.

The cool weather helped, and just more than 30 runners ended up needing any medical help.

School of Medicine students, residents and faculty joined health care professionals from across Hospitall Hill to man the medical tent at the 2018 Hospital Hill Run.

“We had a very light day in the medical tent,” said Margaret E. “Meg” Gibson, M.D., medical director for the Hospital Hill Run and director of the UMKC Sports Medicine Fellowship. “The cool weather definitely was a big factor. However, we still had runners coming in with hyperthermia, high temperatures, and needed immediate treatment. Most presented with fatigue, muscle cramps, needing ice.”

Gibson, who has worked the race for nine years, said 50 to 100 people needing help on race day is more typical. She and her staff were ready for much worse. The medical tent was stocked with cots, ice packs, bandages and even an iced-down tub to treat the worst cases of overheating.

“We had an excellent team of volunteers that provided excellent care,” said Gibson, who practices in the Department of Community and Family Medicine at Truman Medical Center Lakewood. “The medical tent would not be a success without their help. In total, we had 16 students, nine residents and fellows from TMC Lakewood and UMKC, 13 nurses from TMC and the community, and two physical therapists from TMC and one from Children’s Mercy Hospital.”

One of the residents, Cassie From, D.O., packed as much as she could into the morning. She ran the 5K before helping staff the tent.

“I have three kids at home, so I’m used to doing more than one thing at a time, fitting things in when I can,” she said Saturday right after the 5K and before any runners came to the tent needing help. “I wasn’t going to be able to do the race Friday evening because I had to work an overnight shift. But when they moved it to this morning, I had a friend sign me up yesterday. So I worked my shift, came here and ran the race, and now I can help in the tent. This also fills a community service requirement for my residency.”

The unique UMKC Health Sciences District is made up of UMKC; its Schools of Dentistry, Medicine, Nursing and Health Studies, and Pharmacy; Children’s Mercy Kansas City and Truman Medical Centers; the Kansas City (Mo.) Health Department; the Missouri Department of Mental Health Center for Behavioral Medicine; Jackson County Medical Examiner; Diastole Scholars’ Center; and Ronald McDonald House Charities of Kansas City.

The Hospital Hill Run was started by E. Grey Dimond, M.D. He also founded the UMKC School of Medicine, which in recent years sponsored the 5K. The UMKC Health Sciences district became the lead sponsor for all the races shortly after the district was founded a year ago.

The race weekend usually draws top runners from around the country, plus many local participants, often from fitness groups. That was the case Saturday for about 15 runners from the Sunday Runday North contingent. They met, stretched, chatted and watched the sky for a while at Crown Center before heading to the starting line.

One member of the group, Matt Kaspar, said this was his first Hospital Hill, and he chose the 7.7-mile race.

“I did a half marathon two weeks ago,” he said, “but this course is more challenging, hillier.”

Perhaps helped by the weather, the division winners in all three races turned in good times.

The first to cross the finish line in the 5K race was Zach Grover, 18, of Lee’s Summit. He won the men’s division in 17:17, followed 13 seconds later by his younger brother, Dylan Grover. Jennifer Butler, 29, of Overland Park, won the women’s division in 22:13. The race had 380 entries.

Zan Johnson, 20, of Olathe, won the men’s division of the 7.7-mile run in 45:12, and Jamie Martens, 42, of Mission, Kansas, won the women’s division in 54:53. That race had 1,004 entries.

An hour and 10 minutes (and 9 seconds) after the starting horn, the half marathon winner crossed the finish line: Austin Bogina, 24, of Arma, Kansas. The women’s division winner, Elle Meyer, 32, finished in 1:21:43. The half marathon had 1,487 entries.

Full race results, along with other information, are available online.

 

Med school students, staff receive vice chancellor honor

Ravali Gummi, David Sanborn, Jennifer Tufts

Two of the School of Medicine’s May graduates, Ravali Gummi and David Sanborn, have been selected as UMKC Vice Chancellor’s Honor Recipients. Staff member Jennifer Tufts, academic advisor in the Department of Biomedical and Health Informatics, also received the honor.

The Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs and Enrollment Management takes nominations from each academic unit to recognize graduating students who have excelled in academic achievement, leadership and service to UMKC and the community.

Gummi was nominated by her faculty mentor, Peter Koulen, Ph.D., director of basic research at the school’s Vision Research Center. Gummi gave a presentation on the Kansas City Free Eye Clinic and was invited to speak during the opening ceremony of this year’s Clinton Global Initiative.

Sanborn, who has served on the school’s Council on Evaluation and Coordinating Committee, was nominated by his docent, Fariha Shaffi, M.D. He is a member of the Gold Humanism Society and the Alpha Omega Alpha medical honor society. Sanborn also led an independent student analysis in preparation for the school’s recent evaluation visit by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education.

Tufts is completing a Master’s of Arts degree through the School of Liberal Arts with a focus on public history and urban planning. While studying for her degree and working, she has served as president of her local community organization for the past two years. Tufts was nominated by her faculty mentor Sandra Enriquez, Ph.D., a professor of history.

School of Medicine welcomes new Years 1 & 2 ETC

Collin Foster

Collin Foster has joined the School of Medicine’s Office of Student Affairs as an Education Team Coordinator in the Years 1 & 2 Office.

Originally from Lubbock, Texas, Foster earned a bachelor’s degree from Wheaton College in Illinois. He returned to Lubbock where he earned a master’s degree in applied linguistics from Texas Tech University, where he became an academic advisor working with undecided and pre-engineering students and helping coordinate the pre-law program.

Foster spent four years in Morocco and France before he and his family moved to the Kansas City area in November 2017. He started his role at the School of Medicine in March.

“I am excited to put my passion and experience to work serving the students in Years 1 and 2,” Foster said.

 

Video series offers training tips for the 2018 Hospital Hill Run

Organizers of the 2018 Hospital Hill Run and presenting sponsor, UMKC Health Sciences District, are providing a series of video training tips to help participants prepare for the Friday and Saturday event on June 1-2 in Kansas City.

One of the most storied road race events in Missouri, it includes a Friday night 5K run and the Saturday 5K rerun, 7.7-mile run and half-marathon.

Go to the Hospital Hill Run YouTube page each Tuesday from now until race weekend for a new video with tips from local sports medicine doctors and trainers on a wide variety of topics. These will look as topics such as running and exercising as a family, staying hydrated during and after training, and preventing running injuries.

In addition to improving your health and wellness, participation in the Hospital Hill Run supports many local charities. This year’s run will benefit the School of Medicine’s Sojourner Health Clinic, a student-run, free safety-net clinic helping the adult homeless and medically indigent in Kansas City.

Volunteers are needed at all events, from handing out race packets, to cheering on athletes, to handing out medals at the finish line. Learn how you can get involved by visiting the Hospital Hill Run web site.

All UMKC staff, faculty, students and alumni may register at a discounted rate or serve as volunteers. Participating staff and faculty can also earn points toward their wellness incentive programs. When registering for the Friday night or Saturday morning race events, use the code SOM2018DISC for 20 percent savings.

Athletes and volunteers: Take part in the 2018 Hospital Hill Run presented by UMKC Health Sciences District!

Multiple race options – 5K, 7.7 mile and half marathon – offered at discounted rates

 

Fourth-year medical student Jordann Dhuse, winner of the  women’s 5K event at the 2017 Hospital Hill Run, and running enthusiast and professor of emergency medicine Stefanie Ellison, M.D., talked to Kansas City’s 41 Action News about training for the 2018 Hospital Hill Run.

The UMKC Health Sciences District is the presenting sponsor for the 2018 Hospital Hill Run – one of the most storied races in Missouri history – on June 1-2, 2018.

Race weekend begins with a 5K run on Friday night – where strollers are welcome and families of all sizes are encouraged to take part. The next morning, runners hit the pavement in the 5K rerun, 7.7 mile and half marathon.

All UMKC staff, faculty, students and alumni may register at a discounted rate or serve as volunteers. Participating staff and faculty can also earn points toward their wellness incentive programs. When registering for the Friday night or Saturday morning race events, use the code SOM2018DISC for 20 percent savings.

In addition to improving your health and wellness, your participation in the Hospital Hill Run supports many local charities, including the School of Medicine’s Sojourner Health Clinic, a student-run, free safety-net clinic helping the adult homeless and medically indigent in Kansas City. And volunteers are needed at all events, from handing out race packets, to cheering on athletes, to handing out medals at the finish line.

To learn how you can get involved in this year’s race, visit http://www.hospitalhillrun.com/.