Tag Archives: Student Affairs

Inaugural class of UMKC School of Medicine Physician Assistants begins courses

Members of the School of Medicine's inaugural class of the Master of Medical Science - Physician Assistant program gather for a group photograph following orientation on Jan. 10.
Members of the School of Medicine’s inaugural class of the Master of Medical Science – Physician Assistant program gather for a group photograph following orientation on Jan. 10.

A group of 14 students are part of the inaugural class of the School of Medicine’s new Master of Medical Science-Physician Assistant program that kicked off its first classroom activities on Tuesday, Jan 21, with lectures in anatomy and ethics.

A joint student orientation with this year’s incoming class of Master of Science in Anesthesia students on Jan. 10 covered information from the Office of Student Affairs covering financial aid and other resources. Students later broke out into individual meetings covering program specific information.

School of Medicine Dean Betty Drees, M.D., addressed the two classes during the orientation session.

“As time goes on, I think it’s critical for us to have these programs in the medical school because with the changes in the health care delivery system, more and more health care is going to be done in teams, not by individuals. And making sure that we have education programs here for the whole team to meet the workforce needs in our own state is really critically important. I think you will see in your careers that what you do will become increasingly in demand as we go to a more team-based approach to health care.”

The Physician Assistant program received provisional accreditation status from the Accreditation Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant in September. Provisional status indicates that the plans and resource allocation for the proposed program appear to demonstrate the program’s ability to meet the ARC-PA standards if fully implemented as planned. Provisional accreditation does not ensure subsequent accreditation status and is limited to no more than five years from matriculation of the first class.

Kathie Ervie, M.P.A.S., P.A.-C., serves as program director and Beverly Graves, M.D., ’83, is the program’s medical director. Two additional faculty members joined the program in November. Holli Paulk, M.B.A., M.P.A.S., assistant teaching professor, serves as the program’s clinical coordinator and is involved in curriculum development, lectures and clinical instruction. Brad Dirks, M.Ed., P.A.-C., also an assistant teaching professor, is involved in curriculum development and didactic instruction.

The School received nearly 100 applications to be part of its first MMS-PA class and about 40 were interviewed. At least 80 percent of the class each year is expected to come from the instate application pool. The program is looking to accept up to 20 students for its second class in 2015, Ervie said.

Class lectures for the PA program will begin on Jan. 21, primarily in a third-floor classroom of the medical school and students will begin early clinical rotations and patient interactions shortly thereafter at Truman Medical Center, Saint Luke’s Hospital, the Kansas City Health Department and other area clinics.

The Anesthesiologist Assistant program began in 2008 with an inaugural class of four students. The program has since graduated 24 Anesthesiologist Assistants and will celebrate its fifth graduating class this May. It accepted 13 students into the program this year.

Five recognized at December graduation ceremony

Mary Gerkovich, Ph.D., associate research professor; Stephanie Koch, MS Bioinformatics; Richard Butin, M.D., Gold 2 Docent; Anush John, M.D., ’13; Carol Stanford, M.D., Gold 5 Docent; Adil Akthar, M.D., ’13; Mariam Nawas, M.D., ’13; Richard Lustig, M.D., Purple 1 Docent; and Beverly Graves, M.D., adjunct assistant professor of Allied Health. Not pictured: Nivedita Ranjan, M.S. Bioinformatics.
December graduation: Mary Gerkovich, Ph.D., associate research professor; Stephanie Koch, MS Bioinformatics; Richard Butin, M.D., Gold 2 Docent; Anush John, M.D., ’13; Carol Stanford, M.D., Gold 5 Docent; Adil Akthar, M.D., ’13; Mariam Nawas, M.D., ’13; Richard Lustig, M.D., Purple 1 Docent; and Beverly Graves, M.D., adjunct assistant professor of Allied Health. Not pictured: Nivedita Ranjan, M.S. Bioinformatics.

Five School of Medicine students — three M.D. candidates and two Master of Science Bioinformatics students — were recognized at the mid-year commencement ceremonies on Friday, Dec. 13, at the Swinney Recreation Center.

Those receiving their M.D. degrees were Adil Akthar, Anush John and Mariam Nawas. Stephanie Koch received the Master of Science degrees in bioinformatics. Nivedita Ranjan also received the M.S. Bioinformatics degree but did not participate in the graduation ceremony.

Students, staff take part in pumpkin contest

Joan Chandra, MS 4, and Harris Choudhry, MS 4, show off the first prize trophy on Oct. 31 after their Green 8 docent team won this year's School of Medicine Pumpkin Carving Contest.
Joan Chandra, MS 4, and Harris Choudhry, MS 4, show off the first prize trophy on Oct. 31 after their Green 8 docent team won this year’s School of Medicine Pumpkin Carving Contest.
Eye Need Your Votes — Green 8's winning student entry
Eye Need Your Votes — Green 8’s winning student entry

The eyes have it.

First place in the School of Medicine’s pumpkin carving contest, that is.

Students from the Green 8 team unveiled this year’s winning entry, a pair of somewhat bloodshot-looking eyeballs crying for support with their name: “Eye Need Your Votes.” School of Medicine staff who cast ballots on the student entries apparently took pity on the pair of eerie orbs over the other seven entries.

At the same time, students cast their winning votes in the staff contest for “School Spirit,” crafted by members of the School’s Office of Student Affairs.

"School Spirit" — Office of Student Affairs' winning staff entry
“School Spirit” — Office of Student Affairs’ winning staff entry

The pumpkin carving contest has become an annual event at the School of Medicine, sponsored by MSAC and the Color Officers. First prize in the student category is a pizza party for the entire color team. Staff winners receive the Gold Stapler and a pumpkin pie.

Student winners:
1st Place: Green 8 “Eye need your votes”
2nd Place: Green 6 “Heisenberg’s Pumpkin”
3rd Place: Year 1 “Scary-go-round”

Staff winners:
1st Place: Student Affairs’ “School Spirit”
2nd Place: Curriculum’s “Viral Vamps”
3rd Place: CME’s “The Hangover”

Other student participants:
EMT’s “Harry Head Injury”
EMT’s “Pumpkin Birth”
Blue 6’s “Nightmare on Holmes Street”
Blue 8’s “Is that my baby”
Green 7’s “Shark Bait”

Other staff participants:
Med Ed Media Center’s “Jack the Roentgen”
Marketing & Communications’ “Mad Husker Fan”
UMKC Police’s “Take a Bite Out of Crime”
Med Ed Support Services/Skills Lab’s “Mess O’ Pumpkins”
Dean’s Office’s “Hall O. Ween, M.D.”

Students lend hand with KC Fun, Fitness Day

Caroline Doo, Seenu Abraham, Ayesha Murtuza, Ingrid Hsiung, Mitali Thanawala, Huma Mujadad, Jesal Amin, Brooks  Kimmis were among the School of Medicine students who took part in the fourth annual Fun and Fitneess Day at the Calvary Community Wellness Center.
Caroline Doo, Seenu Abraham, Ayesha Murtuza, Ingrid Hsiung, Mitali Thanawala, Huma Mujadad, Jesal Amin, Brooks Kimmis were among the School of Medicine students who took part in the fourth annual Fun and Fitneess Day at the Calvary Community Wellness Center.
Meghna Singh, Lauren Thai and Rachel Crockett take part in the the health screenings at the annual Fun and Fitness Day.
Meghna Singh, Lauren Thai and Rachel Crockett take part in the the health screenings at the annual Fun and Fitness Day.

Some were armed with blood pressure cuffs and stethoscopes, others with paint brushes. Thirty-two School of Medicine students joined forces with several local health organizations and the Calvary Community Outreach Network in reaching out to the community for a day of fun and health awareness at the fourth annual Kansas Fun and Fitness Day on Oct. 12 at the Calvary Community Wellness Center.

The volunteers provided a wide range of health services including blood pressure, cholesterol, glucose and vision screenings, information on STD awareness and dental hygiene, as well as a nutrition/fitness booth and a first aid booth. Others participated in other fun-filled activities such as face painting.

The School of Medicine’s Medical Student Advisory Council (MSAC) coordinated the event in conjunction with the Calvary Community Outreach Network. Volunteers came from the local AMA, APAMSA, KC Free Eye Clinic/Ophthalmology Interest Group, and SNMA organizations as well.

The afternoon included carnival activities, rides and games for children, and music by national recording artist Beverly Crawford in addition to the health screenings.

 

Denise Davis returns to SOM as Marjorie Sirridge, M.D., Outstanding Women in Medicine Lecturer

Denise Davis, M.D., '81, (left) stands with her daughter and Stuart Munro, M.D., chair of the Department of Medical Humanities and Social Sciences, after she delivered the Marjorie S. Sirridge, M.D., Outstanding Women in Medicine Lectureship on Sept. 19 at the School of Medicine.
Denise Davis, M.D., ’81, (left) stands with her daughter, Aviva, and Stuart Munro, M.D., chair of the Department of Medical Humanities and Social Sciences, after she delivered the Marjorie S. Sirridge, M.D., Outstanding Women in Medicine Lectureship on Sept. 19 at the School of Medicine.

Denise Davis, M.D., ’81, has spent the past year looking at women physicians’ lives from a unique perspective: the vantage point of their daughters. Davis presented the 2013 Marjorie S. Sirridge, M.D., Outstanding Women in Medicine Lectureship on Sept. 19 at the School of Medicine to UMKC faculty, staff and students, as well as other members of the community, about “Pride and Presence: Narratives of Women Physicians and their Daughters.

She has been working on the study, which explores the relationships and feelings between mother physicians and their daughters, for a year after being inspired by her invitation to deliver the lecture and her relationship with her own daughter.

“This lecture on the narratives of women physicians and their daughters was inspired by some of the paradoxes my daughter said she observed in me,” Davis said. “She said when she heard me on the phone with patients I displayed patience … she also tells me that sometimes in communicating with her, I come off as demanding and short-tempered. And yet, not only is my daughter surviving, she’s thriving. This peaked my curiosity.”

Davis, an internist, is an associate clinical professor of medicine at the University of California San Francisco, a member of the core faculty for the Center of Excellence in Primary Care, San Francisco VA Medical Center and a member of the American Academy on Communication in Healthcare. At UCSF, she currently serves as an attending for residents, nurse practitioners and nurse practitioner fellows in ambulatory care.

Along with medical student remediation, Davis is involved in faculty development workshops and teaches topics that range from basic communication skills, including improving doctor-patient communication, obtaining informed consent, working with angry patients and negotiating cultural differences in clinical relationships, to giving effective feedback to learners and coaching learners through remediation. Davis has received the Kaiser Foundation Award for Excellence in Teaching for her work with students at UCSF School of Medicine.

She consistently received awards as one of “America’s Top Doctors” and has received many Patients’ Choice Awards during her 20 years in a successful private practice. Consumer Checkbooks rated her as one of the finest physicians in the East Bay and the J magazine readers twice voted her as one of two favorite primary care physicians in the Bay Area.

Communication is a pillar on which her career has been based. Davis has been involved with the American Academy on Communication in Healthcare for 10 years. Through education, research and training, the organization helps caregivers improve the health care setting. Her love of communication led to her interviewing the sample of women physicians and their daughters for the study she presented at the Marjorie Sirridge Lecture.

“Even if this lecture had been cancelled [for any reason], it would have been worth it to me to pursue this journey of listening to other women and their daughters talk about their experiences, their strengths, their joys,” she said. “And some of the women said this interview process has led them to talk more with their daughters about the meaning of their work.”

Davis said she plans to continue interviewing and see what themes continue to emerge. “It would be great to speak with a more diverse group of women and single mothers,” she said. “I also do a lot of work with residents and would like to learn more about young women, what their thoughts are on becoming mothers and what they think would be supportive for them.”

Mary Sirridge, Ph.D., daughter of Marjorie and William Sirridge, M.D., welcomed Davis on behalf of her mother and her other family members.

“My mother has watched Dr. Davis’ career since she graduated over 30 years ago from UMKC with great fondness and great interest,” she said. “Like my mother, Dr. Davis has moved back and forth between being a skilled and caring physician to being someone who’s very involved in passing the baton to the next people in line.”

Davis mentioned her gratefulness for the mentorship she received from Marjorie Sirridge and what it meant to her to come back to the School as the Marjorie S. Sirridge, M.D., lecturer.

“It connects me with her nurturing of me and how that made a difference and continues to make a difference in my life, not only as a physician, but also as a mother and as a person.”

SOM team invites walkers to help raise money to fight diabetes

STEPOUT copySchool of Medicine faculty, staff, residents and students are invited team up and take part in Step Out: Walk to Stop Diabetes on Sept. 21 to raise money and support the American Diabetes Association.

Step Out, which takes place annually at venues across the country, is the signature fundraising walk for the American Diabetes Association, having raised more than $170 million in its 20-year history. More than 120,000 participated in 120 walks throughout the United States last year, raising more than $24 million.

This year’s Kansas City walk will take place at Theis Park, located across from Kansas City’s Nelson-Atkins Art Museum. The two-and-a-half mile walk begins at 9 a.m. with registration open at 7:30 a.m.

Local walkers will take a path through Theis Park, along Brush Creek toward the Country Club Plaza, and return to the park.

Click on this link for Online registration to join team UMKC SOM, or you can copy and paste the link http://main.diabetes.org/site/TR?team_id=606502&fr_id=9064&pg=team into your Web browser.

The School of Medicine team has set a goal to raise $1,000 through this year’s event.

For questions, contact Robyn Burky at burkyr@umkc.edu or 235-6017.

InDOCtrination kicks off med school career for Class of 2019

Family and freinds were busy capturing the moment during the introduction of the Year 1 class at the School of Medicine's 2013 InDOCtrination Ceremony on Aug. 16 at Pierson Auditorium.
Family and freinds were busy capturing the moment during the introduction of the Year 1 class at the School of Medicine’s 2013 InDOCtrination Ceremony on Aug. 16 at Pierson Auditorium.

A class of 113 first-year medical students took a collective first step toward their medical degrees from the UMKC School of Medicine as they participated in the annual Year 1 InDOCtrination Ceremony on Aug. 16 at Pierson Auditorium on the Volker Campus.

The event marks the beginning of the school year and a six-year journey for the Class of 2019.

Raymond Cattaneo, M.D., 03, president of the School of Medicine Alumni Association, delivered the keynote address to students, speaking about what lies ahead for them and the significance of the career path they’ve chosen.

George Harris, M.D., assistant dean for Years 1 and 2 medicine, introduced the members of the class by their docent units. The class then listened to a reading of the Oath of Physicians, an oath that the class will recite together at their graduation in May 2019.

Rahul Maheshwari, MS 2, was recognized as the recipient of this year’sl Richard T. Garcia Memorial Award. The award is presented annually to a Year 2 student who displays outstanding leadership skills, compassion toward his or her fellow students, and outstanding academic performance throughout Year 1.

White Coat Ceremony kicks off next step for Year 3 class

Gold 3 Docent Amgad Masoud, M.D., places the white coat on new Year 3 student, Ankit Mehta, during the School of Medicine's annual White Coat Ceremony on Aug. 10.
Gold 3 Docent Amgad Masoud, M.D., places the white coat on new Year 3 student, Ankit Mehta, during the School of Medicine’s annual White Coat Ceremony on Aug. 10.

Each of 103 new third-year UMKC School of Medicine students received a reminder of the importance of being a physician during the annual White Coat Ceremony on Aug. 10 at the UMKC White Recital Hall on the Volker Campus.

Ray Cattaneo, M.D., president of the School of Medicine Alumni Association, told the class that their white coats should serve as a reminder that while their ultimate job is to heal, they must “do it with responsibility, honor, justice and respect.”

The White Coat Ceremony has been a tradition for students entering their third year of the School of Medicine since 2003. Sponsored by the Arnold P. Gold Foundation, it emphasizes the importance of compassionate care for patients as well as proficiency in the art and science of medicine and marks the beginning of Year 3 training at the School of Medicine as medical students join docent units on Hospital Hill and at Saint Luke’s Hospital.

Amgad Masoud, M.D., assistant professor of internal medicine, received the 2013 Outstanding Year I-II Docent Award that is selected each year by students.

SOM Career Fair set for Aug. 17

The School of Medicine’s Career Services Office will sponsor a career fair for all students from 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. on Aug. 17 at the School of Dentistry cafeteria.

The program offers students the opportunity to meet and talk with medical sepecialists and explore different career paths in specialties including:

  • Anesthesiology,
  • Cardiothoracic Surgery,
  • Emergency Medicine,
  • Family Medicine,
  • Internal Medicine,
  • Medical Genetics,
  • Neurological Surgery,
  • Neurology,
  • Obstetrics & Gynecology,
  • Orthopaedic Surgery,
  • Otolaryngology,
  • Pathology,
  • Pediatrics,
  • Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation,
  • Plastic Surgery,
  • Psychiatry,
  • Radiology—Diagnostics, and Surgery.

No registration is necessary.

Masters program in health professions education taking applications

The Masters Degree in Health Professions Education provides an educational research foundation for teaching, assessment and leadership in health professions education.
The Masters Degree in Health Professions Education provides an educational research foundation for teaching, assessment and leadership in health professions education.

The new Master in Health Professions Education (MHPE) degree, a joint program offered through the UMKC School of Medicine and School of Education, is accepting applications. The program is geared to launch a new generation of expert teachers and curriculum specialists for schools of medicine, nursing, pharmacy, dentistry and for the allied health professions.

The MHPE focuses on incorporating the latest medical research into curricula, the design and delivery of evidence-based educational programs and courses, program evaluation, the effective use of assessment tools, educational research in the health professions and leadership. Johns Hopkins, Vanderbilt and Baylor have similar programs.

“The health professions community has clearly recognized the need to provide formal support for teaching and assessment and the master’s degree is supported as the most effective vehicle for doing this,” said Ellen Lavelle, Ph.D., Director of Health Professions Education.

The 36 hour program may be completed in two years. All courses are project-based. Students develop projects that will reflect their current professional interests and impact teaching and learning in those areas.

Two unique features of the MHPE are the Professional Educators Portfolio, which provides an opportunity to apply learning and showcase projects across courses, and the Summer Health Professions Mini-Conference, which is designed and delivered by students with the support of faculty.

The program is open to all health professions and allied health faculty and students at UMKC.