All posts by Greg Hack

Humming along in St. Joseph

Members of the first class of first-year medical students at the UMKC School of Medicine’s new St. Joseph campus are studying hard and preparing to meet patients in April. The campus aims to provide more physicians for underserved rural areas in Missouri.

The students, who all live in St. Joseph, attend classes at the school’s area within the Mosaic Medical Center. Each has a work station at the school, and a video-equipped classroom allows them to see, hear and participate in lecture classes simultaneously with students at the Health Sciences District campus.

Each year, the St. Joseph campus will add another class of 20 students till there’s a full complement for the four-year M.D. only program.

Look for a full report on the new campus in the next issue of UMKC Medicine, coming to you in May.

A year of challenges met, with more ahead

One year after COVID-19 was declared a pandemic, UMKC School of Medicine Dean Mary Anne Jackson, M.D., says we are getting closer to returning to normal.

On March 11, 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic was officially declared by the World Health Organization, and we have since watched the unremitting spread of SARS CoV-2 across the world, with more than 29 million cases in the US and more than 500,000 who have lost their lives. Beyond the human toll, widespread and extensive consequences impacted a substantial part of the population in terms of lost jobs, depleted bank accounts, lost housing, struggles to know how we best educate our children and impacts on our physical and mental health. And we have witnessed the disproportionate toll on Blacks, Hispanic and Native Americans. Across our country, we were forced to change not only the way we navigated our daily life but within the School of Medicine, we had to confront how we responded to support our students.

As the pandemic unfolded, we were forced to make changes, to adapt and quickly evolve like we’d never done before in our 50-year history. And on May 18, 2020, just three short months into the pandemic, we celebrated the graduation of the class of 2020. The rapid changes we were forced to make in our curricular plans as we rose to the challenge of the pandemic, demonstrated flexibility and resilience as we ensured our students stayed on path to graduation. And our students responded with perseverance, determination, and an intense desire to continue to contribute meaningfully within the healthcare environment, learning virtually, participating in telemedicine and being part of the COVID-19 response team.

We are proud of the curricular innovation we brought to the meet the student needs and to ensure teaching, supervision, assessment, and student advancement remained top of our focus. We’ve also engaged with a mission and vision to meet the promise we made in May, 2020 to work toward social justice and to dismantle racism that has resulted in the cumulative effects of inequity in the learning environment. By listening to the voices of our students, staff and faculty and taking action, we ensured we stay true to our promise to transform our curriculum, to stay true to our mission and vision and that our structure, and function allowed all of our students to perform to the best of their ability.

But we know these curricular disruptions and lost opportunities to develop the collaborative relationships prevented them from fine tuning their skill set as we paused clinical rotations at the onset of the pandemic—resuming them after our class of 2020 had departed for their residencies. They lost the opportunity to build collegial relationships as their electives in their area of focus were cancelled, and they were unable to travel to present their research at national conferences—all of the final touches on their educational journey that they felt would allow them to be prepared for residencies.

Our students who graduated in 2020 were the first ever to finish their medical school journey with virtual electives, to have an entirely virtual ceremony to celebrate their match day and an entirely virtual ceremony to celebrate their graduation. We sent them off to residency programs in an era of uncertainty as we watched the historic spread of COVID-19 across our country and we brought them forward to the front lines of care. Each of our students who graduated in 2020 has a personal story of how the pandemic impacted them as they completed their education here at UMKC SOM.

We are now at a point that we have an extraordinary database and more than 100,000 peer reviewed publications in just one year that best informs how we diagnose, treat, and prevent COVID-19. We are at a point in the pandemic that we are encouraged –by the sustained decrease in cases, hospitalizations and test positivity in our community and as we welcome the advent of highly effective COVID-19 vaccines. We are moving ever so much closer to our goal of herd immunity.  Our commitment and ability to provide exceptional medical education that transforms and improves the health and well-being of the students and patients we serve has been our North Star throughout the pandemic—and the lessons we’ve learned will inform us for years to come.

 

A hundred momentous destinations

There’s nothing quite like the excitement of Match Day, even when all the action is online. The roughly 100 graduates and graduates-to-be of the UMKC School of Medicine found out by email, just after 11 a.m. Friday, where they will spend the next stage of their medical careers.

Dean Mary Anne Jackson, M.D., addressed students, their families, faculty and friends with a video message. She congratulated the UMKC Class of 2021 for its hard work the past six years and especially during the past challenging year of COVID-19 shutdowns and other disruptions.

“This ceremony, which you know is a rite of passage for medical students across the country, is even more significant this year,” Jackson said. “I know the uncertainty of the pandemic has created disruptions for you on your medical school journey, from a pause in clinical rotations at the beginning, the elimination of away electives, the shortages of PPE that created changes in how we cared patients, and a move to virtual formats for didactic lectures, and everything from residency interviews to our most special ceremonies including this one.”

Jackson said the docents, faculty and staff were proud of the Class of 2021 and appreciated its members’ focus, flexibility and resilience.

“As you scatter across the country, I know you will continue to make us proud by demonstrating the knowledge, kindness, empathy, compassion and professionalism you’ve learned here,” Jackson said.

As they did a year ago, students had to celebrate individually, but many did so at home with friends and family.

2021 UMKC School of Medicine Match List

Half of the UMKC class will be headed to a primary care residency in internal medicine, family medicine, obstetrics/gynecology, or pediatrics. That exceeds the national average and is in line with the school’s mission to provide primary care for the Kansas City area, Missouri and the rest of the Midwest.

The students won assignments in 22 states, from California to New York and Washington state to Florida. Missouri had 26 of the placements, followed by 10 in Texas, eight in Florida, six each in Kansas and Illinois, five in California and four each in Arizona, Indiana, Louisiana, Minnesota, New York and Ohio.

And, as usual, some are headed to the top names in medicine, including three to Mayo and two to the Cleveland Clinic. Twenty-four will stay in the Kansas City area, most of them at UMKC and its affiliate hospitals.

Internal medicine was the top category with 32 placements, followed by 10 in family medicine, nine in various types of surgery, eight in pediatrics or medicine-pediatrics, seven in emergency medicine and six in psychiatry.

Watch the video from the event

A message from Dean Jackson

A new year and a new semester bring hope and reminders that we accomplished much in 2020 despite all the obstacles a pandemic brings.

As an infectious disease specialist, I’ve spent my career studying communicable disease epidemiology. I’ve been involved in vaccine development and implementation, including in response to the 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza virus. But SARS CoV-2 is unique, and it has been unbelievable watching the devastating impact of this virus unfold with more than 88 million infections and more than 1.9 million deaths recorded across 218 countries and territories.

Within the United States as of Jan. 13, there have been more than 22 million cases and deaths have exceeded 382,000. A terrible milestone was reached twice in one week in January when more than 4,000 U.S. deaths occurred in a day. In our country, in our state and in our city, our hospitals have been challenged – we have dealt with the hard truth that at various times we have had insufficient open beds, shortages of PPE and a need for more nurses and other members of our team to care for patients. While we welcome the first ever COVID vaccines, and rejoice that more than 10 million physicians, nurses and other front line workers have received one of the vaccines, it will be well into this spring — if we launch a more effective implementation program — before we can safely say that the pandemic is under control. Still, our SOM is celebrating as vaccines have been administered to most staff and faculty at our clinical sites, while the vaccination of medical, PA and MSA students has started. That said, we continue to emphasize the critical importance of adhering with requirements for masks, social distancing and avoiding community or family gatherings that may put more people at risk.

This month, course work and clinical rotations have begun for the first group of students at our St. Joseph campus. Our partnership there with Mosaic Health System is supported by a $7 million grant from HRSA. This marks a significant expansion of our commitment to rural medicine, a pressing need in Missouri and many other states. At the Health Sciences District campus, our students have continued their education, not missing a beat as they move toward graduation. On both campuses, a careful blend of online courses and in-person clinicals promises to keep our students safe while giving them the patient interaction and docent learning that are hallmarks of our unique approach to training tomorrow’s physicians and physician assistants.

The final months of 2020 also reminded us that our commitment to research benefits us all. The School of Medicine has more than doubled the amount of awards we’ve received in the past 5 years. Most recently, Peter Koulen, Ph.D., at the Vision Research Center and Jannette Berkley-Patton, Ph.D., leading the UMKC Health Equity Institute have secured grants to further their vital work. One recent alumni, Apurva Bhatt, currently a UMKC psychiatry resident, gained national recognition for her findings on guns and suicide. And our students continue to be encouraged to conduct their own research through top national fellowships, our longstanding Sarah Morrison grants program, and student research events such as the Vijay Babu Rayudu Quality & Patient Safety Day and the Symposium of Undergraduate Research and Creative Scholarship, which will be held virtually this year.

On Jan. 13, we bid farewell to our founding PA program director, Kathy Ervie, who is taking a fulltime clinical position with an orthopaedic group in Clinton, Missouri. After graduating from Butler University’s PA program in 1998 and receiving her master’s degree in physician assistant studies from the University of Nebraska, Kathy practiced full-time in the area of orthopedic surgery in our community before brainstorming and moving forward a plan to launch a PA program at UMKC SOM. She took a full year to build our program, which started in 2012 with Kathy as its founding PD.

With 92 graduates as of May 2020, a 100 percent certification exam pass rate and a 100 percent employment rate, the PA program has been vastly successful and is ready to expand in 2022. Even the disruption of COVID-19 did not stop the MMSPA program, as Kathy developed a contingency plan to avoid disruption of student enrollment, remain in alignment with ARC-PA accreditation standards, and continue to support student opportunities and assessment to meet program learning outcomes.

As I watched Kathy work with students over the last three years, I saw her as someone who communicated thoughtfully, asking her students to commit to their work as she willingly engaged in all aspects of their education. There are big shoes to fill indeed for the next PD!

We also mourned the passing of Dr. Louise Arnold on Dec. 17 and gave thanks for all she accomplished in 40-plus years at the school in posts that included associate dean for medical education and research. She served the school from its outset as a true pioneer and the foremost proponent in national medical education circles of our 6-year B.A./M.D. program and docent education. We deeply miss her, personally and professionally.

In light of all we accomplished in the past year despite the pandemic, we look forward to continued advances in 2021. Just as our students, faculty and staff are furthering our mission in medical education, research and service, I know that each of you continues to make a difference in people’s lives. Thank you for your continued support and your contributions to our legacy.

Mary Anne Jackson, M.D. ’78
Dean, School of Medicine

A message from Dean Jackson

Recruiting, educating and graduating the students at our medical school are occurring in a time like no other. In the year 2020, as we confront the global COVID-19 pandemic, we also stand united in fighting the injustices and inequities that are emblematic of racism in America.

In our country, in our state, and in our city, hospitals have been overwhelmed and have dealt with the hard truth that we have insufficient beds, continued critical shortages of personal protective equipment, and too few nurses and other members of our team to care for patients. The physical and mental health tolls have required specific efforts to address and care for those who are suffering burnout and compassion fatigue. While we welcome the first ever COVID vaccines, it is likely that it will be well into spring of 2021 before we can safely say that the pandemic is under control. This stark fact underscores the importance of all members of our community adhering to requirements for masks, socially distancing and avoiding community or family gatherings that may place you at risk for contracting and spreading COVID-19.

The pandemic has amplified the racial and ethnic health care inequities that over the years have been rooted in systemic racism. As a people, as physicians, as health care professionals, we oppose racist ideas and behaviors and stand as advocates for racial justice, promoting open dialogue and active educational policies. We have consistently seen an over-representation of Black, Hispanic and Native American patients who suffer and die from COVID-19. This health inequity spans the age groups as we see Hispanic and Black children diagnosed and hospitalized at rates that far exceed those of White children.

Embracing a comprehensive approach to create and sustain a diverse and culturally responsive workforce that works toward eliminating health inequities is our mission. We have expanded our leadership within the Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion with our associate dean, Dr. Tyler Smith, and the addition of an assistant dean, Doris Agwu. We have engaged Professor Mikah Thompson, a critical-race scholar who has been instrumental in launching our first ever anti-racism curriculum. Dr. Diana Dark, associate dean in the Office of Learning Environment, has worked to assure that we meet the students’ educational needs within a culture of care, inclusiveness and belonging. Dr. Dark leads the Expect Respect Committee, working to reduce mistreatment at all levels. She has introduced the student ombudsperson, and is developing a faculty professionalism statement. Dr. Liset Olarte has created the Latinos in Medicine physician group to mentor our Latinx students. Dr. Melissa Lewis, a member of the Cherokee nation, will advance our recruitment of tribal students, and we hope to add curricular content she has developed that addresses the history of and solutions to health inequities that continue to affect indigenous peoples in our society.

We proudly will expand our campus to St. Joseph, Missouri, in affiliation with Mosaic Health System to recruit, prepare and encourage a workforce that will address the shortage of providers in rural areas. This effort, backed by an award of $7 million issued by HRSA, supports our commitment to train those who will focus on rural health care. The first student cohort begins in January, and all curriculum will be delivered where they will live and train. With leadership from Drs. Steve Waldman, Davin Turner and Kristen Kleffner in collaboration with support from our senior associate dean of curriculum, Dr. Nurry Pirani, we are confident that our pre-clinical curriculum will be seamlessly delivered on both the Health Sciences District and the St. Joseph campuses. Since the onset of the pandemic, Drs. Mike Wacker and Darla McCarthy and all of our faculty have been instrumental in ensuring that our students receive this content using a virtual format that is inclusive of what they require in the biomedical sciences.  The St. Joseph campus will maintain the docent system and the early introduction of clinical experience for these students.  As these students advance to their clinical curriculum, we look forward to their engagement with Mosaic physician leaders to guide them, similar to the expertise provided by faculty at our anchoring partners: TMC, Children’s Mercy, St. Luke’s, the Center for Behavioral Medicine, Research Medical Center and the VA in Kansas City.

We celebrate the growth of research fueled by the talents of Drs. Jannette Berkley-Patton, Peter Koulen, Gary Sutkin, Paula Monaghan-Nichols, Jared Bruce and Nihar Nayak. They along with many others have allowed us to more than double the amount of awards we’ve received in the last 5 years. We recognized this past month distinguished faculty and celebrated the promotion of 73.  Thank you to the work of Dr. Christine Sullivan, associate dean of professional development, and her committee, who selected the awardees after a SOM-wide competition. Those honored included Dr. Molly Uhlenhake for her contributions to Excellence in Diversity and Health Equity in Medicine, Dr. Gary Sutkin for Excellence in Medical Education and Research, Drs. Fariha Shafi and Peter Koulen for Excellence in Mentorship, Drs. Emily Hillman and Darla McCarthy for Excellence in Teaching, and Dr. John Wang for Excellence in Research. University awards were presented to Dr. Jennifer Quaintance for Excellence in Teaching and to Dr. Peter Koulen, who received the Trustees Faculty Fellow Award.

At this moment in time, I ask that each one of you know that you make a difference in people’s lives. The road ahead will continue to be challenging. Our students are our future health care leaders, and it is our privilege as the faculty and staff at UMKC SOM, to be part of that future. I believe we are in good hands.

Mary Anne Jackson, M.D. ’78
Dean, School of Medicine

 

Stuart Chen, early faculty member and docent, remembered

Longtime School of Medicine faculty member Stuart Chen, M.D., Ph.D., died Oct. 17, 2020, at age 87.

Upon his passing, Dean Mary Anne Jackson wrote the following:

Dr. Chen completed his Internal Medicine residency and gastroenterology fellowship at the University of Minnesota. He then spent eight years at the West Virginia University School of Medicine prior to joining the School of Medicine faculty in 1977. As an early SOM Docent on the Gold 6 Unit and a Professor of Medicine, he joined Dr. E. Grey Dimond leading a large contingent of UMKC School of Medicine students and faculty on a trip to China in 1980. During his time as a Gold unit docent, he led 45 of our graduates from years 3 through 6.

Dr. Chen left the SOM and Truman Medical Centers for a three-year stent between 2001 and 2004 working as a gastroenterology consultant for the Rockwood Clinic in Spokane, Washington, before returning to UMKC and TMC. He continued this work until just recently when the COVID pandemic struck. Over the years, he has been involved in the education and training of countless students, residents, GI fellows and faculty. He was a dedicated medical staff member at Truman Medical Centers for more than 40 years, covering two tours of duty in the section of Gastroenterology Department of Medicine. Dr. Chen was a dedicated physician but more importantly, a gracious colleague who will be greatly missed by all of us.

Dean Richardson Noback, who worked together with Dr. Chen after his arrival on the faculty in 1977,  stated that “he brought dignity and strength with the experience of both the medical and research degrees to his roles in the School of Medicine. He was always attentive, courteous, gracious, strong, and measured in his interactions with patients, house staff, students, and others.”

Our sympathies are extended to his family, friends and all of the staff and faculty at Truman Medical Centers, within our School of Medicine and to his community of family and friends. His wife, Yeh-Jung Lee Chen, preceded him in death in 2018 and their only child, Jennifer Chen Tyler, a beloved producer at KCUR and columnist with the Pitch, died in 2019, leaving behind her husband, Erik Tyler, and a young daughter.

Dr. Chen’s obituary is available here.

Vigilance required in the pandemic

As COVID-19 cases surge in the Midwest and across the country, UMKC and the School of Medicine are re-emphasizing the precautions that have kept the cases on campus relatively low and under control. Here are some resources you and your students may find helpful.

The university has been transparent in reporting aggregated data and individual reports on all known cases on campus; this information is updated daily. From mid-August through Oct. 27, there were 158 cases across the UMKC campuses, of which 28 were still active. In all cases, the students or staff members were quarantined, and contact tracing identified and notified others who needed to quarantine. Of all these cases, nine were reported from School of Medicine locations and the Hospital Hill Apartments.

As part of campus COVID-19 resources, UMKC has produced a series of informational videos, including several involving first-year medical students. Our medical students’ awareness of UMKC policies and strict observance of them have been vital to stemming the pandemic, and vigilance will be needed as cold weather arrives.

It’s all part of the School of Medicine’s commitment to keeping students, faculty and staff safe while continuing to provide excellent classroom and clinical experiences.

Thanks to you and your students for your diligence.

Health equity mini-grants aim to jump start collaborative research

The mini-grants are intended to foster research collaborations that improve community health.

Making access to health care more equal is a tough task, and a pandemic only makes the job tougher. To help, the UMKC Health Equity Institute is trying a new tool — mini-grants to university researchers and their community partners — to boost those efforts.

“We have about $12,000 to $15,000 to spend, and we think putting $1,000 to $2,000 in the right places could help eight to 10 projects move forward,” said Jannette Berkley-Patton, Ph.D., the director of the institute and a professor in the UMKC School of Medicine. “Sometimes help paying for study participants, software, consultants or other resources can make a real difference.”


Apply HERE for a
UMKC Health Equity Institute
Mini-Grant
Deadline is Nov. 9

Though small, the grants could be the seed money — or the Miracle-Gro® — needed to turn ideas into budding projects that encourage and measure the effectiveness of community health efforts.

The brief application for the mini-grant program is available now, and institute members are encouraging researchers and community groups to submit their joint applications. Applicants are strongly encouraged to attend a webinar Oct. 16 to learn information about the mini-grants. Important information, such as budget documents and the grant program overview, are available, as well.

Applicants will have until Nov. 9 to submit their proposals, after which finalists will be chosen. The finalists then will give short oral presentations and recipients will be chosen. The institute plans to have the funds available at the beginning of 2021.

“We’re hoping the mini-grants stimulate our researchers to be creative and to collaborate with community partners — or build relationships with new partners,” Berkley-Patton said. “The institute’s steering committee will evaluate the applications, and we hope to have applicants make a brief, but impactful, oral pitch for their proposals sometime this fall in a virtual presentation akin to “Shark Tank®.”

The idea behind the Health Equity Institute, an initiative Chancellor C. Mauli Agrawal started in April 2019, is to partner UMKC researchers with community groups, non-profits and government agencies in underserved areas on projects that aim to improve community health.

The institute, for example, is working with the Kansas City Area Transportation Authority to evaluate the impact of the city’s now-free bus service on health outcomes. The institute wants to understand whether their recruited residents’ health and overall well-being improve because they walk more and have better access to jobs and health care through the free transit system. The institute has also helped the Kansas City, Missouri, Health Department conduct COVID-19 drive-through testing by coordinating more than 90 student volunteers. The students helped with intake, traffic control and providing COVID-19 information to people seeking testing.

The institute also helped with formation of an interfaith ministers’ group, the Clergy Response Network,

founded to address COVID-19 inequities in Kansas City’s faith-based settings, and has created a church reopening checklist for clergy. The network recently received 30,000 face masks to distribute to congregations to help slow the spread of the coronavirus.

Berkley-Patton is a veteran of community-based health research, including studies that engage churches and other community-based organizations’ in efforts to combat health disparity issues such as HIV and other STDs, mental health, obesity and diabetes.

“We need more research projects that improve the health of people where they live, play, worship and work, and projects that can be sustained for the long haul after research shows they work,” Berkley-Patton said. “We think these mini-grants can get more projects like these up and running while engaging the community in research efforts that we hope will reduce disparities and improve health in Kansas City’s urban areas.”

For more information on the mini-grant program, visit the Health Equity Institute website.

 

A message from the dean: Hope and inspiration as we move forward

Dear Alumni:

We are entering the 7th month of the coronavirus pandemic in the United States, and I am happy to say we have welcomed our 2026 class and successfully completed the first weeks of the fall 2020 semester at the UMKC School of Medicine. Students are in the dorms, meeting with their docents as usual, but classes look a little different this semester, with some classes online and in-person classes using venues to allow us to fill at 25% capacity.

I recently had the opportunity to stop while on Volker campus to meet with our Year 1 medical students, who were attending their anatomy class in Pierson Auditorium. Taught by one of our best, Dr. Tara Allen, this class is one of the most important for our first-year students. As a graduate of the SOM, I remembered my first classes on Volker campus, and emphasized to the students the importance of focusing on classwork and creating their support network. I was impressed by their grasp of the personal responsibility to wear their masks, socially distance and not gather in large groups—and this past week, a group of nine of them created COVID educational videos which we are launching across the campus.

We are just a few months away from having a COVID vaccine, and I hope that by spring 2021, we will have successfully immunized enough of the population to put a hold on SARS CoV-2 spread.

Confronting the crisis of the pandemic that amplifies the health inequities in our country also has accelerated our SOM work to advocate for social change in our country. The killing of George Floyd sparked the nation to confront systemic racism, and called on us all to begin the work of transforming our society. We will advocate for racial justice in our communities, are actively working toward racial equity in patient care, and made curricular changes by adding Professor Mikah Thompson from our School of Law to educate all of our students and faculty on the history of and manifestations of racism in our society. The dismantling of racism is a critical imperative and requires all of us to come together to promote the changes we need to ensure there is equality for all.

Seeing our newest students and my recent meetings with our more senior student leaders at the School of Medicine give me hope for our future.

As always, your continued support of our school is greatly appreciated.

Mary Anne Jackson, M.D. ’78
Dean, UMKC School of Medicine

Saint Luke’s fares well in U.S. News hospital rankings

Saint Luke’s Hospital of Kansas City, an affiliate of the UMKC School of Medicine, was the No. 2 hospital in Missouri and the Kansas City area in the 2020-2021 U.S. News & World Report rankings of hospitals nationwide.

The hospital’s cardiology and heart surgery specialty jumped in the national rankings to No. 22 from No. 42 last year. It also fared well in four specialties, receiving “high performing” rankings in gastroenterology and GI surgery, geriatrics, neurology and neurosurgery, and orthopedics.

The hospital also was deemed “high performing” in eight procedures and conditions: abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, aortic valve surgery, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, colon cancer surgery, heart bypass surgery, heart failure, lung cancer surgery and transcatheter aortic valve replacement. That last procedure, also known as TAVR, is being more widely used as a less-invasive alternative to aortic valve surgery.

In Missouri, Barnes Jewish Hospital in St. Louis had the top ranking, and the University of Kansas Hospital was top ranked in the Kansas City metro area.

The U.S. News rankings are based on reputation and data including patient outcomes and readmission rates. Twenty-six specialties, procedures, and conditions in nearly every community hospital in America were reviewed, according to the report.

To be nationally ranked in a specialty, a hospital must excel in caring for the sickest, most medically complex patients. In most specialties, the top 50 hospitals are nationally ranked and additional hospitals may be recognized as high performing.

In a separate ranking of children’s hospitals earlier this year, another School of Medicine affiliate, Children’s Mercy Kansas City, was nationally ranked in all 10 of its pediatric specialties.