CME Transcripts

The UMKC School of Medicine Continuing Medical Education program was open from early 2010 through December 31, 2016.  For transcripts falling within this time frame, please call 816-235-6809.  If you need transcripts for any CME activities occurring from 2017 forward, please contact the program sponsor directly.

Producing leaders in health care

Grads

Since 1971, the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine has been preparing and producing tomorrow’s health care’s leaders.

Each year, we celebrate as our graduates join the ranks of those that came before them, beginning their careers in a variety of health care and related industries. Across this country, our graduates have established themselves as leaders in patient care, research, education, organized medicine, the military, industry and government.

Among the leadership positions held by UMKC School of Medicine graduates:

  • Chief of the Division of Cardiology at the Mayo Clinic
  • Deputy Director of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
  • Founder of Massachusetts General’s In-Vitro Fertilization Unit
  • Chairman of Radiology at Boston Medical Center
  • Surgeon General of the United States Air Force

The UMKC model of medical education is known for producing skilled and caring clinicians, with many serving in myriad leadership roles.

Deans Past & Present

 

Richardson K. Noback, M.D.
Founding Dean (1969) 1971-1978

Founding Dean Richardson K. Noback, M.D., served as a consultant assisting Kansas City General Hospital and the University of Missouri-Columbia in developing a health sciences center on Hospital Hill in the 1960s. In 1971 – before the school opened – he was selected acting dean and then dean of the new UMKC School of Medicine, a role he served until 1978. Dr. Noback continued working as a senior docent at the school until 1990. He retired from medicine in 1993.
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Founding Dean Richardson K. Noback, M.D., played a key role in bringing the innovative system of health care delivery and medical education to the UMKC School of Medicine, but he came by way of traditional medicine.

He earned his bachelor’s degree at Columbia University and his medical degree at Cornell University Medical College. He did post-graduate training at New York Hospital and Bellevue Hospital, and served on the faculty of State University of New York-Syracuse. In addition, he was tapped to work with the University of Kentucky to develop its health sciences center, where he offered some unconventional concepts for teaching medicine and science.

Although Kentucky did not accept all of Dr. Noback’s revolutionary ideas for its new medical center, his views did align closely with the vision of Grey Dimond, M.D., founder of UMKC’s medical school – an accelerated, dual-degree program encompassing the docent system of learning. In the early 1960s, Dr. Noback served as a consultant assisting Kansas City General Hospital and the University of Missouri-Columbia in developing a health sciences center on Hospital Hill. He was eventually hired as chairman of the project’s executive committee. In 1969 – before the school opened – he was selected acting dean and then dean of the new University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine. After leaving his deanship in 1978, Dr. Noback served as senior docent until 1990. He retired from medicine in 1993.

 

Jonas-duoHarry S. Jonas, M.D.
1978-1987

For Harry S. Jonas, M.D., work in academic medicine started as volunteer teaching in the residency program at Kansas City’s General Hospitals 1 and 2. He was recruited to serve as the hospital’s first chairman of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and later at Truman Medical Center. In 1978, he accepted the role of dean at the UMKC School of Medicine, where he had served as an assistant dean and chairman of the Council on Evaluation.
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In 1956, Harry S. Jonas, M.D., a successful private-practice physician, found himself being drawn to academia, and eventually the UMKC School of Medicine.

After serving two years in the Navy during World War II, Dr. Jonas earned his undergraduate and medical degrees at Washington University in St. Louis. After completing his residency in St. Louis, he and his wife moved to the Kansas City area, where he joined an independent practice. His work in academic medicine started as volunteer teaching in the residency program at General Hospitals 1 and 2. He was recruited to serve as the hospital’s first chairman of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and later at Truman Medical Center. Before accepting the role of dean in 1978, he served UMKC School of Medicine as an assistant dean and chairman of the Council on Evaluation. He held the position of dean for nine years.

Dr. Jonas considered himself a dean that was “externally oriented,” and found his greatest reward in his work with students. He found success in helping the medical school overcome challenges with the national accrediting organization, the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (largely due to the school’s unconventional system of teaching medical students). He eventually left the school to become secretary of this organization. He also served as assistant vice president of the American Medical Association.

 

Mongan-duoJames J. Mongan, M.D.
1987-1996

Dean James J. Mongan, M.D., brought a wealth of medical and health-care policy expertise to the UMKC School of Medicine in 1987. A graduate of Stanford University, Dr. Mongan honed his policy background by serving on staff of the U.S. Senate Finance Committee and in high-level positions in President Jimmy Carter’s administration. While serving as the school’s dean, Dr. Mongan also held the position of executive director at Truman Medical Center, a dual role he served until 1996.
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James J. Mongan, M.D., brought a wealth of medical and health-care policy expertise to the UMKC School of Medicine during his time as dean. A graduate of Stanford University, where he earned both his bachelor and medical degrees, Dr. Mongan honed his policy background by serving on staff of the U.S. Senate Finance Committee and in top-level positions in President Jimmy Carter’s administration.

While serving as executive director of Truman Medical Center, one of the medical school’s primary teaching hospitals, Dr. Mongan accepted the position of the medical school’s dean, serving in a dual role for 12 years. He was instrumental in making significant changes and improvements in the school’s overall financial status. He also successfully expanded graduate medical education programs with other hospitals, facilitated the teaching affiliation with Saint Luke’s Hospital, and brought focus to strengthening the school’s alumni relations, minority recruitment and humanities departments.

Dr. Mongan left UMKC for the opportunity to serve as president/chief operating officer at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, the oldest and largest teaching affiliate of Harvard Medical School. Throughout his career, he was widely sought after and recognized as a health care policy expert, participating on the Pew Health Professionals Commission, the Kaiser Commission of the Future of Medicaid, the Kaiser Family Foundation Board of Trustees, and the Health Advisory Committee of the U.S. General Accounting Office, among other organizations.

 

Anderson-duoRatcliffe Anderson, Jr., M.D.
1996-1997

Dean E. Ratcliffe Anderson, Jr., M.D., came to the UMKC School of Medicine with 30 years of distinguished military service. He served the concurrent role of medical school dean and executive director of Truman Medical Center until 1997, when the joint appointment structure changed. At that time, Dr. Anderson left the school to exclusively serve on the hospital’s administrative team.
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In 1996, UMKC School of Medicine welcomed its fourth dean, E. Ratcliffe Anderson, Jr., M.D., a leader with 30 years of distinguished military service, culminating as the surgeon general of the U.S. Air Force. In that role, he participated in the process of privatizing the Air Force medical service under a single managed care system. He also launched major military health promotion and disease prevention programs.

Dr. Anderson graduated from the Louisiana State University School of Medicine and completed a dermatology residency in the military at Wilford Hall Medical Center. While dean of the UMKC School of Medicine, he concurrently served as executive director of Truman Medical Center, in addition to participating as vice president of the Aerospace Medical Association and a member of the House of Delegates of the American Medical Association.

In 1997, the joint appointment structure between the school and Truman Medical Center changed, eliminating the combined dean/executive director position. Dr. Anderson’s role was devoted exclusively to administrative leadership at the hospital. He continued to serve as a professor of medicine at the school, as well as a legislative advisor on medical industry issues.

 

Sirridge-duoMarjorie S. Sirridge, M.D.
1997-1999

The appointment of Dean Marjorie S. Sirridge, M.D., marked UMKC School of Medicine’s return to a full-time dean exclusively serving an academic leadership role. Dr. Sirridge was an ideal fit to lead this transition, having a long history with the school. She was one of its three founding docents, as well as co-founder and co-director of the Office of Medical Humanities bearing her name. Following her time as dean, Dr. Sirridge remained on faculty as director of the school’s medical humanities program.
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The UMKC School of Medicine introduced a familiar face as its new dean in 1997: Marjorie S. Sirridge, M.D. She originally committed to serve a one-year appointment, but – much to the benefit the school – she stayed for two.

Dr. Sirridge first came to the school in 1971, where she and her husband, William T. Sirridge, M.D., served as two of the school’s three founding docents. Before accepting the role of dean, she served as the school’s assistant dean for curriculum. In 1992, she and her husband established and co-directed the Sirridge Office of Medical Humanities, a role she continued during and after her time as dean.

Her tenure marked the return to a full-time, academic leadership position of dean at the school; during the nine years prior, the role of dean was combined with the executive director position at Truman Medical Center. Dr. Sirridge was an ideal fit to lead this transition, giving her undivided attention to academic issues essential to educating future physicians.

Dr. Sirridge received her medical degree from the University of Kansas School of Medicine, and went on to specialize in internal medicine and hematology. Her career included private practice and faculty positions at the University of Kansas, until she was recruited by UMKC to help lead the docent system in 1971. Dr. Sirridge spent the remainder of her career serving numerous roles at the School of Medicine, including the appointment as professor emerita in 2005.

 

Friedland-duoMichael L. Friedland, M.D.
1999-2001

Dean Michael L. Friedland, M.D., joined the UMKC School of Medicine in 1999, bringing his experience as dean of Texas A&M College of Medicine. In his role at UMKC, he identified the school’s top priorities as developing research initiatives, recruiting basic medical science faculty, holding down tuition costs and strengthening the medical program’s reputation – all areas where he made significant strides. In addition, he also introduced new programs to meet the underserved and rural health care needs in our community.
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With a reputation as a promoter of research and an innovator in medical education and administration, Dean Michael L. Friedland, M.D., joined the UMKC School of Medicine in 1999.

Prior to UMKC, Dr. Friedland served as dean of the College of Medicine at Texas A&M University System Health Science Center. Drawing on previous experiences, he identified key priorities for UMKC’s medical school: developing research initiatives, recruiting basic medical science faculty, holding down tuition costs and strengthening the medical program’s reputation. During his tenure as dean, he led significant strides in these areas, while also creating programs to meet the underserved and rural health care needs in our community. Many of these programs continue today.

Dr. Friedland was a board-certified internist and hematologist. He received his medical degree from SUNY (State University of New York) Downstate Medical Center. Throughout his career, he received numerous awards and honors, and published many articles. After leaving UMKC, he continued serving in leadership roles in medical education, culminating as the founding dean of the Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University.

 

Betty M. Drees, M.D.
(2001) 2003-2014

After serving at the UMKC School of Medicine as associate professor, docent physician, associate dean of academic affairs, executive associate dean and interim dean, Betty M. Drees, M.D., assumed the role of dean in 2003. Her 13-year tenure was marked with accomplishments in fiscal strength, collaboration, student success, new education programs and research. Today, Dr. Drees continues to hold academic appointments in the school’s Department of Internal Medicine and Department of Basic Medical Sciences.
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The UMKC School of Medicine was a familiar to Betty M. Drees, M.D., long before she accepted the position of dean. She first joined the school in 1998 as associate professor and docent physician. She also served as associate dean of academic affairs, executive associate dean and interim dean before taking the full-time role of dean in 2003.

As dean, Dr. Drees was devoted to providing quality health care and research, and was dedicated to academic medicine and training. During her tenure, the school achieved fiscal strength, and made significant advances in collaboration, student success, new education opportunities and research. She led the school in developing professional anesthesiologist assistant and physician assistant programs, as well as graduate and certificate programs in bioinformatics. She also worked to fund seven endowed chairs and professorships, bringing the total to 22 – the most of any academic unit in the University of Missouri System.

Dr. Drees earned her bachelor’s degree from Wichita State University and her medical degree from the University of Kansas, where she also completed an internal medicine residency and an endocrinology fellowship. Prior positions included program director of Specialty Care Services at the Kansas City Veterans Affairs Medical Center and associate professor at the University of Kansas School of Medicine. Today, she continues to hold academic appointments in UMKC’s Department of Internal Medicine and Department of Basic Medical Sciences.

 

Kanter-duo

Steven L. Kanter, M.D.
2014-2018

Joining the UMKC School of Medicine in 2014, Steven L. Kanter, M.D., is well-positioned to lead the school into its next half-century. Known for his leadership in medicine, biomedical informatics and medical education, Dr. Kanter also serves as a professor of biomedical and health informatics, a professor of medicine, and the Merle and Muriel Hicklin/Missouri Endowed Chair in Medicine. He earned his bachelor’s degree at Texas A&I University, his medical degree from the University of Texas School of Medicine in San Antonio, and trained in neurological surgery at the University of Florida.
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History played a role in attracting Dean Steven L. Kanter, M.D., to the UMKC School of Medicine: specifically, the school’s current place in history. As the school nears its first half-century of providing medical education, it is also preparing for the next 50 years, an opportunity Dr. Kanter embraced as the new dean in 2014.

Another draw? The school is at the forefront of biomedical informatics and a leader in medical education, two areas Dr. Kanter knows well.

In addition to his role as the school’s eighth dean, Dr. Kanter served as professor of biomedical and health informatics, a professor of medicine, and the Merle and Muriel Hicklin/Missouri Endowed Chair in Medicine.

Dr. Kanter earned his bachelor’s degree at Texas A&I University and his medical degree from the University of Texas School of Medicine in San Antonio. He trained in neurological surgery at the University of Florida. His previous positions include neurological surgeon at a large multispecialty clinic and hospital in Temple, Texas, a medical informatics fellow at the University of Pittsburgh, and the founding director of the Office of Medical Education at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

Before joining the UMKC School of Medicine, Dr. Kanter served as vice dean and a professor of medicine at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. From 2008 to 2012, he served as editor-in-chief of Academic Medicine, the peer-reviewed journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges.

Dr. Kanter’s work has been recognized through many awards and honors, including the Merrell Flair Award, the highest honor awarded by the Association of American Medical Colleges’ Group on Educational Affairs. His contributions reflect a leadership, knowledge and experience with medical school, teaching hospital and university issues.

 

Mary Anne Jackson, M.D.
2018-Present

Mary Anne Jackson, M.D., is a 1978 graduate of the UMKC School of Medicine. She is a professor of pediatrics with a specialization in infectious diseases at Children’s Mercy Hospital, one of the school’s partner teaching hospital and a member of the UMKC Health Sciences District. Dr. Jackson began her tenure as interim dean on July 1, 2018 – April 30, 2020. Her appointment as dean began May 1, 2020.
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Dr. Jackson is internationally respected for her impressive record of scholarly achievement. She serves on the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Red Book Committee on Infectious Diseases, a publication that provides guidance on the diagnosis, treatment, manifestations and epidemiology of more than 200 childhood conditions. She is a journal reviewer for American Journal of Infection Control, Journal of Pediatrics, Pediatrics, Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal and JAMA Pediatrics, among many other research publications.

Dr. Jackson has won numerous awards for her mentorship including the Children’s Mercy Department of Pediatrics Excellence in Mentoring award in 2015, and Golden Apple Mentoring Awards in 2012 for mentoring fellows and 2013 for residents. In 2012, she received a Take Wing Award, presented annually at the School of Medicine to one who has demonstrated excellence in his or her chosen field and exceeded the expectations of peers in the practice of medicine, academic medicine or research.

In 2017, Dr. Jackson was selected to the National Vaccine Advisory Committee. She also serves on the American Heart Association’s Committee on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young as well as numerous additional national, regional and local committees.

UMKC School of Medicine: A History of Excellence

Appointed consultant to UMKC chancellor on health affairs, E. Grey Dimond, M.D. works to establish the School of Medicine and its non-traditional docent system of learning.
1968

Richard K. Noback, M.D., is named dean of the new UMKC School of Medicine.
 
Aug. 30 marks first day of class; 18 students begin their medical education.
 
The school signs Research Medical Center as one of its partner teaching hospitals.

1971

Children’s Mercy Kansas City signs affiliation agreement to be a primary teaching hospital of the school.

1972

Nine students admitted with “advance standing” are the school’s first M.D. graduates.

1973

The new $13.2 million School of Medicine building opens.

1974

The school begins a long-standing relationship with the People’s Republic of China, accepting a formal invitation to visit for a “study and analysis of the Chinese health care system.”

1975

Truman Medical Center opens, replacing General Hospital as one of the school’s primary teaching hospitals.
1976

The Friends of the UMKC School of Medicine is founded to provide support to the school and its students.
1977

Harry Jonas, M.D., becomes dean.
1978

The school welcomes Dr. Hsu Chia, the first exchange physician from the People’s Republic of China to come to the United States, as the first Edgar Snow Professor.
1979

Summer Scholars is established to expose minority and disadvantaged youth to careers in health care.
1980

Faculty from the School of Medicine and the School of Dentistry develop one of the country’s few combined oral and maxillofacial surgery/M.D. programs.
1985

The Eye Foundation is founded by Felix Sabates, chairman of the school’s Department of Ophthalmology, to support patient care and vision research.
1986

James Mongan, M.D., is appointed dean.
1987

The school and its docent system of learning is named a Model Education Program by the National Fund for Medical Education.
1988

School of Medicine and Saint Luke’s Hospital finalize their primary teaching hospital affiliation agreement.
1989

Construction of the Mary Clark and E. Grey Dimond Scholars’ Center – known as Diastole – is completed.
1991

The school signs agreement with the Center for Behavioral Medicine, making it a primary teaching hospital.
1994

Stuart Munro, M.D., is appointed interim dean. E. Ratcliffe Anderson Jr., M.D., is named dean later this year.
1996

Marjorie Sirridge, M.D. accepts a two-year appointment as dean.
1997

The school forms a new Basic Medical Science division, bringing medical student classes in anatomy, physiology, biochemistry and microbiology under the direction of the medical school.
1998

Michael Friedland, M.D., is appointed dean.
1999

The UMKC and University of Kansas schools of medicine partner to create Saturday Academy, a free program for middle and high school students interested in health careers.
2000

The school’s Shock/Trauma Research Center is established, one of the first in the Midwest.
2002

Betty M. Drees, M.D., is appointed dean.
2003

The school’s medical students establish the Sojourner Clinic, providing free health care to the homeless.
2004

Kansas City VA Medical Center signs agreement to serve as a primary teaching hospital for the school.
2005

The school’s Youngblood Medical Skills Lab opens, equipped with human simulators to provide a realistic learning environment for future health care professionals.
 
The school’s Vision Research Center opens, serving as the Department of Ophthalmology’s research arm.
2007

The school welcomes the first students to its Master of Science in Anesthesiology program, one of only a handful across the country designed to help address the shortage of anesthesia services.
2008

The Master of Science in Bioinformatics is offered through a joint effort by the UMKC School of Medicine, School of Biological Sciences and School of Computing and Engineering.
2009

In collaboration with UMKC’s School of Graduate Studies, the School of Medicine launches its new Interdisciplinary-Ph.D. program in Biomedical and Health Informatics.
 
School of Medicine founder E. Grey Dimond, M.D., passes away at the age of 94.
2013

Steven L. Kanter, M.D., is appointed dean.
 
The school welcomes 14 students into its new Master of Medical Science Physician Assistant program.
2014

The school’s family medicine residency is recognized as a top program by U.S. News and World Report, ranking No. 7 in the Midwest.
 
School receives $1.9 million grant from National Institute of Mental Health to continue research leading to new drug therapies and treatments for depression.
2015

Dean’s Visiting Professor Series

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Learning in docent teams

As a foundation of UMKC’s medical education program, the docent system takes the best of apprenticeship learning and combines it with small-group teaching, mentoring, peer coaching and other techniques.

Students start their education by joining a docent team, where they learn from one another, as well as from faculty physicians known as docents. In this setting, docents provide clinical instruction while also guiding students’ personal and professional development. The system develops the attitudes, beliefs, competencies, habits, and standards students need to be the best physicians possible.

In first two years of the B.A./M.D. program, docent teams consist of 10 to 12 students from the same class. In the third year, students join new docent teams that mix students in years 3 through 6, as well as, students entering UMKC’s four-year M.D. program. Docent units are based at the School of Medicine and Saint Luke’s Hospital of Kansas City, a UMKC partner hospital, and provide individual offices, as well as a common meeting space for the team.

By design, the docent system fosters a spirit of mentorship. A Year 3 student is paired with a Year 5 student, allowing the older student to serve as a mentor and friend. This junior-senior partnership continues for two years, until the more senior student graduates and the junior student takes the role of mentor.

The docent system emphasizes practical, bedside teaching. During years 3 through 6, teams spend half a day each week assisting their docent in an outpatient clinic, and two months with their teams on daily rounds at affiliate hospitals Truman Medical Center or Saint Luke’s Hospital. These experiences provide a wealth of clinical exposure and emphasize the team nature of modern medicine. Nurses, clinical pharmacists, medical librarians, social workers, and other professionals join the docent physician in instructing students.

Docent teams have been part of UMKC’s medical education since its inception. The one-on-one and one-on-few experiences teach students how to use information, how to approach ambiguity and uncertainty, and how to think critically about challenges in medicine and biomedical science. It is a unique and outstanding program that continues to position the School of Medicine and its graduates among the best in the field.

Learn more about UMKC’s School of Medicine programs

UMKC School of Medicine: Six years, two degrees

rounds-for-BAMD-article

In 1971, UMKC’s School of Medicine opened with a unique way to teach and train tomorrow’s physicians. Nearly 50 years later, the school’s accelerated, dual-degree program continues to take students straight from high school and immerse them in an integrated curriculum consisting of liberal arts, basic sciences and clinical medicine.

The result? More than 3,300 graduates from the UMKC School of Medicine, the majority of whom have earned both their bachelor’s degree and medical degree in just six years versus the eight years typical for most medical school graduates.

Upon entering the B.A./M.D. program, students are classified as professional students. They begin studying medicine on their first day and clinical experience begins immediately. The initial two years also include courses leading to bachelor degrees in liberal arts, chemistry, or biology. Clinical experiences increase in the third year, where students work together one-half day a week in an outpatient continuing care clinic and also on two-month internal medicine rotations throughout each of their final three years.

“This program provides immediate, weekly clinical experience that keeps you motivated throughout your coursework,” said one student, “It gives you early patient exposure that traditional programs do not offer until the beginning of third year.”

The six-year concept took shape in 1968 when E. Grey Dimond, a cardiologist and former chairman of medicine at the University of Kansas, spearheaded a new medical school at UMKC. He used his own medical education as the stimulus for his six-year plan: Prior to World War II, the military condensed medical school to 36 rigorous months, with no spring or summer breaks, to quickly churn out much-needed physicians. Dimond was among these military graduates.

“That experience was so stimulating to me,” he said. “That sense of urgency kept me enthusiastic all through my years (of medical school).”

Today, Diamond’s accelerated program for medical education still serves as the school’s foundation. UMKC graduates are in high demand among the nation’s medical residency programs and generally fare as well or better than their peers in residency. Among the school’s recent graduate placements: Barnes-Jewish Hospital, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Children’s Mercy Kansas City, Massachusetts General Hospital, Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education and the U.S. Air Force.

Learn more about the UMKC School of Medicine six-year B.A./M.D. program

UMKC School of Medicine

The School of Medicine has graduated more than 3,000 physicians since it opened in 1971. Nearly 50% of the School’s alumni practice in Missouri, the greater Kansas City area, and the St. Louis metropolitan area.

UMKC School of Medicine enrolls more than 600 students in its accelerated BA/MD program and MD program. The accelerated program is 1 of 3 in the nation. Students receive more clinical exposure than almost any other medical school in the nation, making graduates well prepared to work with patients as partners in their continued health.

The Master of Science in Anesthesia is the only program in Missouri to train students to serve as anesthesiologist assistants as part of a health care team. A new Master of Medical Science Physician Assistant began in January 2014. These programs help address health care needs in Missouri.

More than 500 residents and fellows train in more than 40 UMKC programs. Almost 50% of physicians stay in Missouri after completing their residency, well above the national average.

Researchers focuses on clinical and translational research. The school has more than 20 endowed chairs and professors who lead research efforts, more than any other school in the University of Missouri System. The master’s degree and interdisciplinary doctorate in bioinformatics helps train researchers and provide top-notch research faculty.