Tag Archives: Residents and Fellows

UMKC goes Smoke-Free on Aug. 1

SmokeFreeBannerA program to clear the air across UMKC begins on Aug. 1 when the Hospital Hill and Volker campuses embark on a new smoke-free, tobacco-free policy. UMKC students, employees and vistors will no longer be allowed to smoke on University property, including parking garages.

Smoking will be prohibited inside all University buildings, but will be permitted outdoors off UMKC property. University properties include, but are not limited to:

  • All outdoor common and educational areas; inside all university owned or leased buildings
  • Campus sidewalks
  • Campus parking lots
  • Recreational areas
  • Outdoor stadiums
  • University-owned and leased vehicles (regardless of location)

The smoking ban does not apply to public rights-of-way (sidewalks/streets) within the campus boundaries, as these are governed by City of Kansas City ordinance.

The University will offer aid to smokers with a desire to quit with a smoking cessation coach and other resources.

“I understand that this change may be difficult for those of you who smoke,” UMKC  Chancellor Leo Morton said. “For employees and students who would like to stop, the university will work in conjunction with Healthy for Life, the Student Health and Wellness Center and other resources that offer cessation programs. In some cases, cessation tools and nicotine replacement therapy will be free to students and employees.”

The policy change comes as a result of a student-led initiative that indicated a significant majority of employees and students of the University value smoke and tobacco-free campuses. The policy reaffirms the University’s commitment to provide a safe and healthy physicial envoironment for its students, staff, faculty, patients and the general public.

Visit the University’s policy page to learn more about the smoke-free initiative.

 

Published study on obese women and breastfeeding garners attention

Felix Oka, M.D.
Felix Oka, M.D.

New mothers who want to breastfeed their babies would do well to watch their weight according to a collaborative study by a group that includes Felix Oka, M.D., M.S., professor of pediatrics and assistant dean for career advising, and fellows Teresa Orth, M.D, and Shilpa Babbar, M.D.

The research conducted by a team of investigators from the School of Medicine, Children’s Mercy Kansas City and the Kansas University Medical Center showed that obesity significantly reduces the chances of a woman ever breastfeeding. Women who are obese are 16 percent less likely to be able to breastfeed than women whose weight falls within a normal range, the study reported. Orth presented results and highlights of the study at the April 26-30 annual meeting of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology in Chicago.

Results were based on a survey of more than 66,000 mothers in the United States conducted between 2009 and 2010. Identifying obesity as a high-risk group for not breastfeeding could help clinicians to design future interventions for overweight mothers.

The student is also the focus of a recent article published in Live Science.