Wellness program event focuses on work-life balance

 

School of Medicine faculty members Rebecca Pauly, M.D., Blue 4 docent, Reem Mustafa, M.D., Blue 3 docent, Fariha Shafi, M.D., Gold 7 docent, Kathy Ervie, M.P.A.S., P.A.-C., director of the School’s Master of Medical Science Physician Assistant program, and Julie Banderas, Pharm.D., associate dean for Graduate Studies and Allied Health, took part in a panel discussion on Oct. 22 at the School of Medicine on how to strike a healthy work/life balance.
School of Medicine faculty members Rebecca Pauly, M.D., Blue 4 docent, Reem Mustafa, M.D., Blue 3 docent, Fariha Shafi, M.D., Gold 7 docent, Kathy Ervie, M.P.A.S., P.A.-C., director of the School’s Master of Medical Science Physician Assistant program, and Julie Banderas, Pharm.D., associate dean for Graduate Studies and Allied Health, took part in a panel discussion on Oct. 22 at the School of Medicine on how to strike a healthy work/life balance.

Striking just the right balance between work, particularly the demanding role of a health care professional, and the home and family life can be a challenge for anyone. A panel of female faculty members from the School of Medicine shared their experience on how they go about it during an after school discussion on Oct. 22 in Theater C.

The Women in Medicine event conducted by the School’s Wellness Program drew a number of female students who took part with questions for five panelists: Julie Banderas, Pharm.D., associate dean for Graduate Studies and Allied Health, Kathy Ervie, M.P.A.S., P.A.-C., director of the School’s Master of Medical Science Physician Assistant program, Reem Mustafa, M.D., Blue 3 docent, Rebecca Pauly, M.D., Blue 4 docent, and Fariha Shafi, M.D., Gold 7 docent.

Pauly, who also works with the School’s faculty development programs, said her advice for maintaining a health balance includes being efficient  and living in the present moment.

“Multitasking means none of the tasks have your full attention and likely are not being completed with your best effort,” she said. “Stay focused.”

There are times in life, Pauly said, when one may need to make the decision to put aspects of their career on hold for a period of time.

“You may decide that you can work full-time while your child is age 3 months to 4 years but when he or she starts school at age 5 or 6, you want to be home in the afternoon and thus need to work part-time until the child enters middle school,” Pauly said. “During these years you may elect to only travel to one academic meeting per year, not three or four.”

Pauly also suggested that one should seek help whether from family, friends or even be willing to hire help to avoid becoming isolated and stretching oneself too thin across too many responsibilities.

“Look for time to escape and rejuvenate,” she said.

The Wellness Program offers students wellness planning and coaching sessions to help them succeed in a rigorous academic environment as well as a variety of workshops throughout the year that focus on topics from cooking to making therapeutic lifestyle changes.

For more information about the Wellness Program, contact Niloofar Shahmohammadi, program coordinator, at shahmohammadin@umkc.edu or at 235-1862.