Mission
Mission

Mission

The mission of the Surgical Innovation Lab is to investigate what threatens patient safety in the operating room. We approach this complex problem through multiple methodologies, including bioengineering, and interprofessional and observational approaches. We are committed to involving learners from UMKC and strive to mentor each student's ability to acquire and critically interpret research data and apply it to theories of surgical learning and patient safety.

Motion Analysis Marker Capture. Mock Setup.
Motion Analysis Marker Capture. Mock Setup.

Motion Analysis Marker Capture. Mock Setup.

The Surgilab uses motion analysis to capture data related to the surgeon's movements. Motion capture markers are attached to multiple points on the surgeon practicing on a simulation model.

The surgical team
The surgical team

The surgical team

Surgery is a team sport. All members of the team are unified in accomplishing the same goal: Effective surgery performed safely.

Projects

Where We've Been

Meet the Team

Contact us

Surgical Innovation Lab Covid-19 Statement

In these challenging times, it’s hard to know what to expect. We recognize the importance of social distancing, and support the current efforts. While many of our research efforts have been put on hold, we are able to continue with many phases of research currently in progress thanks to technology. We could choose to ‘tread water’, or we can choose to keep doing research by changing our focus to tasks that can be accomplished while staying compliant with social distancing requirements.

Our choice? “Let’s Keep Doing Research!”

Who we are:

Welcome to Surgilab! Our lab was formed in 2016 in collaboration with the UMKC School of Medicine. Our research aims to understand how patient safety is threatened in the Operating Room and how to make surgery safer. As surgeons and researchers, we should investigate every surgical error, no matter how minor, and analyze it so we can identify a preventive solution.  We aim to approach this complex problem through multiple methodologies, including biomedical engineering, interprofessional collaboration, and ethnography, including film study of the operating room. Our goal is to reduce the surgical error rate As Low As Reasonably Possible (ALARP). Our research is generously supported by the University of Missouri and the Victor and Caroline Schutte Foundation.

In the News

We are going places (without going anywhere!)

Congratulations to Dr. Sutkin and Dr. Brommelsiek on having an image from their collaborative project, Visual Excavation: Reconstructing Scientific Data into Visual Artifacts. The image selected illustrates Dr. Sutkin’s visceral experience of working on a cadaver, and was one of 12 images selected out of 44 submissions. The work depicted for the Silent Auction sponsored by BioNexus KC (@BionexusKC). The event is virtual and can be accessed by visiting https://bionexuskc.org/events-calendar/s2a/  The artwork is titled, “Trocar 3”. The piece is also on dispaly on the 3rd floor at Truman Medical Center (Health Sciences District location).

In addition, the complete book series is now available in the Library Research Center at the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, D.C.

Dr. Margaret Brommelsiek’s abstract, “Absence or presence: silent discourse in the OR and impact on surgical team action”, has been accepted for presentation at AMEE 2020 The Virtual Conference being held (virtually, of course) next week. Check back next week for links to the presentation.

Dr Sutkin’s abstract, “Relational Interdependence Generates Insights about “Atomic” Intraoperative Teaching and Learning” has also been accepted for presentation at AMEE 2020 The Virtual Conference. Check back next week for links to the presentation.