Tag Archives: Medical Education

UMKC School of Medicine: 50 years of excellence in medical education

Graduation has always been a special celebration for docents and their students at the UMKC School of Medicine.

Fifty years ago, the University of Missouri-Kansas City launched a bold experiment in educating the medical leaders of the future.

After years of planning, more than $8.8 million in federal funding and a charter class of 18 students, the doors of the UMKC School of Medicine opened in 1971.

Fifty years later, that bold experiment is a cornerstone of Kansas City’s medical community.

This month, the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine is kicking off its yearlong observance of the 50th anniversary. A new logo, a special website and many special events will highlight the celebration. Among the key events:

  • A series of distinguished guest lectures, including:
    • Nov. 5: Roger Bush, M.D., from University of California-San Francisco, speaking on rural health inequities.
    • Nov. 17-19: Silvio Inzucchi, M.D., from Yale, sharing research linking type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance and cardiovascular complications.
    • Dec. 2: Harriet Washington, medical ethicist from Harvard Medical School, speaking on medical apartheid.
    • Dec. 9: Kenneth Churchwell, M.D., from Boston Children’s Hospital, speaking on pediatric critical care (Noback-Burton Lecture).
    • Feb. 11: Geeta Swamy, M.D., from University of North Carolina- Chapel Hill and Duke University, speaking on maternal vaccines, COVID pregnant women, preterm delivery interventions.
  • Special signage around the SOM campus and 50th-anniversary themed touches for Match Day, Commencement and other signature academic occasions.
  • A Gold Jubilee 50th anniversary gala, set for June 4, 2022, at the Loews Hotel in downtown Kansas City.

Today as in the past, UMKC’s School of Medicine is making a difference the health and wellbeing of Kansas City communities and beyond. Long known for its innovative research, humanities-focused education and unique medical programs – namely the accelerated BA/MD program where students enter medical school straight from high school and complete their degrees in six years – UMKC continues to graduate future leaders in health care. The school has been instrumental in founding Kansas City’s UMKC Health Sciences District, where it continues to play a primary role.

“This is an exciting time for the UMKC School of Medicine, as we celebrate half a century of history and traditions,” said Mary Anne Jackson, M.D., ’78, dean of the medical school. “As our nation’s health care profession has evolved, so has the School of Medicine. We are bringing new technologies and innovations to the forefront that continue to solidify our standing as a leader in today’s medical education.”

Since 1971, nearly 4,000 physicians and health care professionals across the United States have received their degrees from the School of Medicine. Through the years, additional programs added include master’s degrees in anesthesia, physician assistant, health professions education and bioinformatics, and graduate certificates in research and health professions education. In January 2021, the school opened its second campus in St. Joseph, Missouri, with a focus on rural medicine. But it is the school’s MD programs and its docent system of learning – where faculty physicians combine the best of apprenticeship instruction with small-group teaching, mentoring, peer coaching and other techniques – that have withstood the test of time and continue to position the school as a trendsetter in medical education.

“Fifty years speaks to the longevity of the school, not to mention we have many physician leaders across the country that are graduates,” said School of Medicine alumni association president Ralph Wuebker, M.D., ’94. “There is no doubt that UMKC is a top medical school!”

Marjorie Sirridge, M.D., one of the three founding docents and later dean of the medical school, once reflected on the early days: “I remember being tired a lot and sometimes discouraged when it seemed that we just couldn’t get it all done. But, mostly I remember the challenge and the excitement of being part of a new adventure in medical education.”

Indeed, it’s been an exciting adventure the past 50 years – and the next several months will celebrate the past, present and future of UMKC School of Medicine. Join us.

American Academy of Pediatrics to honor SOM’s Dr. Mary Anne Jackson

Jackson, Mary Anne
Mary Anne Jackson, M.D.

The American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Infectious Diseases Executive Committee has chosen to recognize UMKC School of Medicine Interim Dean Mary Anne Jackson, M.D., with the 2019 Award for Lifetime Contribution in Infectious Diseases Education.

The award recognizes her outstanding commitment to educating pediatricians in infectious diseases, her work as associate editor of the Red Book, the foremost source on pediatric infectious disease, and her efforts on a national level with groups such as the National Vaccine Advisory Committee.

Jackson is recognized locally, regionally and nationally as a master clinician and educator on the topic of pediatric infectious diseases. A pediatrician at Children’s Mercy Kansas City for 35 years, she is widely recognized for developing one of the nation’s leading and most robust infectious diseases programs. The division focuses on research to prevent antibiotic resistance, judicious use of antibiotics, and optimal use of vaccines.

She is also passionate about medical education including developing a fellowship program to train pediatric infectious diseases doctors. And she is active in research collaborations with foundations including the CDC and the NIH to investigate the impact of new vaccines. Among her many achievements while division director has been the description of a national outbreak of the polio-like virus called enterovirus D68.

A mentor to many residents, fellow trainees and others in pediatric fields, Jackson often guides others to access leadership roles in the fields of pediatric infectious diseases, child abuse and mistreatment, and general pediatrics.

She was appointed interim dean of the School of Medicine in June 2018, becoming the first graduate of the program to become dean and one of only 26 female medical school deans in the nation. In that role, she has begun a transformation of programs to enhance student and faculty engagement, worked to find solutions to ongoing issues, and has continued her commitment to pediatric infectious diseases at Children’s Mercy. She was also recently appointed the Special Advisor to the Chancellor on Health Affairs and will assist in the current search for a new dean.

The American Academy of Pediatrics honored Jackson with the lifetime achievement award on Oct. 28 during its national conference and exhibition in New Orleans.

LaGrece joins SOM as new media center manager

Sarah LaGrece is the new manager of the School of Medicine’s Medical Education Media Center.

Sarah LaGrece has been selected as the new manager of the School of Medicine’s Medical Education Media Center. She will also serve as a senior operations technician at the Clinical Training Facility.

A graduate of UMKC, LaGrece will oversee the media center that serves as the School of Medicine’s instructional resource lab with anatomical models, and audiovisual and computer-based learning materials.

The media center will be open from noon to 5 p.m. during the week. Students can contact LaGrece to make arrangements to use the facility outside of the normally staffed hours. School administration is exploring options to provide additional staffing to expand these daily hours, she said.

In the meantime, LaGrece will be working on taking inventory, updating and repairing the models, and updating the computer software available for students, residents and faculty.

Her morning hours will be spent in the Clinical Training Facility, assisting with administrative duties, simulations with the facility’s mannequins, and helping with the standardized patient program.

A life-long resident of Kansas City, LaGrece graduated from Bishop Miege High School before attending UMKC and earning her bachelor’s degree in communications.

“I was thinking about being a teacher before I went into communications, so education was something I was always interested in,” LaGrece said. “So this seemed to mesh well with my interests.”

Faculty present School of Medicine program at European medical conference

barcelonaconference_facultypresent
Paul Cuddy, Pharm.D., senior associate dean, School of Medicine Dean Steven Kanter, M.D., and Stefanie Ellison, M.D., associate dean for curriculum, where part of the School of Medicine delegation at an international conference on medical education in Barcelona, Spain.

UMKC School of Medicine faculty presented important work on the Docent System of Medical Education, the long-term success of its graduates, and other topics to an international audience of medical educators at the 2016 annual meeting of the Association for Medical Education in Europe (AMEE) at the end of August in Barcelona, Spain.  AMEE’s annual conference draws more than 3,000 delegates each year and AMEE selects presentations through a competitive, peer-reviewed process.

Paul Cuddy, Pharm.D., senior associate dean, Stefanie Ellison, M.D., associate dean for curriculum, Gary Sutkin, M.D., associate dean for women’s health, and Steven L. Kanter, M.D., dean, led workshops, gave oral presentations, and presented posters to share the School of Medicine’s successes and challenges with peers from other medical schools spanning six of the world’s seven continents.

Cuddy and Kanter led a workshop on the school’s Docent System and how apprenticeship learning is enhanced by peer mentoring and longitudinal clinical experiences.  In a separate session, Cuddy gave an oral presentation on learning communities and how the School of Medicine’s strong longitudinal clinical experiences provide a springboard for medical students to achieve leadership roles in medicine and science.  Louise Arnold, Ph.D., past director of medical education and research, Jennifer Quaintance, Ph.D. director of medical education support services, Susan Hathaway, Ph.D., and Kanter were co-authors of the presentation.

Ellison presented a peer-reviewed poster on the development and implementation of the Core Entrustable Professional Activities in the school’s six-year dual-degree program. Emily Haury, M.D., docent, and Quaintance were co-authors of the poster presentation.